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Dalai Lama causes a stir at UCSD

Chinese students don't want him as commencement speaker

But the Dalai Lama can draw a crowd
But the Dalai Lama can draw a crowd

According to the publication Inside Higher Ed, Chinese students at the University of California/San Diego are complaining that the university is having the Dalai Lama as this year's commencement speaker. Lhamo Dondrub (the Dalai Lama) is an exiled Tibetan spiritual leader who is persona non grata in China, despite his 1989 Nobel Peace Prize and the worldwide respect he has gained.

Some Chinese students "have condemned the choice of commencement speaker as culturally disrespectful," says the publication. Chinese students call him "a separatist leader intent on dividing their home country."

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On February 7, student Ruixuan Wang wrote in UCSD's Guardian, "Our family members are coming all the way from China, flying for more than 10 hours to celebrate with us. The Dalai Lama, as a political icon, is viewed differently in our country."

But other students reacted negatively to Wang and the protests by other Chinese students. "The Chinese students [who are protesting] are acting on behalf of a clearly fascist, violent communist regime," said one in comments following Wang's article.

"Go back to China and experience your freedom of choice there," wrote ImamAzol.

A less articulate person, calling himself Joe Schmoe, remarked, "F..k off, you Commie scum."

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But the Dalai Lama can draw a crowd
But the Dalai Lama can draw a crowd

According to the publication Inside Higher Ed, Chinese students at the University of California/San Diego are complaining that the university is having the Dalai Lama as this year's commencement speaker. Lhamo Dondrub (the Dalai Lama) is an exiled Tibetan spiritual leader who is persona non grata in China, despite his 1989 Nobel Peace Prize and the worldwide respect he has gained.

Some Chinese students "have condemned the choice of commencement speaker as culturally disrespectful," says the publication. Chinese students call him "a separatist leader intent on dividing their home country."

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On February 7, student Ruixuan Wang wrote in UCSD's Guardian, "Our family members are coming all the way from China, flying for more than 10 hours to celebrate with us. The Dalai Lama, as a political icon, is viewed differently in our country."

But other students reacted negatively to Wang and the protests by other Chinese students. "The Chinese students [who are protesting] are acting on behalf of a clearly fascist, violent communist regime," said one in comments following Wang's article.

"Go back to China and experience your freedom of choice there," wrote ImamAzol.

A less articulate person, calling himself Joe Schmoe, remarked, "F..k off, you Commie scum."

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Comments
137

It always seems to boil down to religion. My (insert religion here) is the one and only on and all others are wrong. I am going to (insert destination) and all others are going to be damned.

Feb. 18, 2017

AlexClarke: What really bothers me is this: why do people attend a university? To get a wide range of opinions on a wide range of topics. The Chinese students and their parents should hear the Dalai Lama.

Similarly, a far right person was hooted off the U/Cal Berkeley campus, so he couldn't give his speech. That is bad. Whatever happened to free speech -- particularly on university campuses? Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 18, 2017

Let's hear it from all of "them." We can either learn from them or let them make fools of themselves. We listen to our President, don't we?

Feb. 18, 2017

Flapper:…Speaking of making fools of one's self… Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

Umm, well Milo blew it. Bwahahahahaha

Feb. 21, 2017

Bug; Milo Who? Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

Coarseness of language, divisive political discourse, our inability to have civil discussions on anything are all problems the younger generations must tackle.

In this example the Chinese students, guests in our country, fail to consider the student body as a whole, deciding their beliefs take precedence. I'm just wondering if their parents really would be this disrespectful as guests in another's home.

Even before hearing the message of the Commencement Speaker, these young Chinese students show they are the ones intolerant, and biased. Not a good sign for their future. Let's hope they don't overstay their educational visas. So they may support human rights in their homeland with equal fervor.

Feb. 18, 2017

JustWondering: Yes, this represents blatant intolerance. What about academic freedom? Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 18, 2017

Them there fer left pointed-headed leeberals have done more to restrict academic freedom than a handful of Chinese "students."

Feb. 18, 2017

Flapper: It is disappointing when progressives disrupt free speech, but, still, conservatives are the worst in this regard. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

Source?

Feb. 20, 2017

Flapper: Source: Sixty years of observance. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

Yeah, I suppose I'd have to agree, but when it comes to self-righteousness I sometimes find the distinction like a chain graph.

Feb. 20, 2017

Flapper: Those on both sides of the aisle are excessively self-righteous. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

Mike Murphy: This reminds me of the song from the musical South Pacific: "You've got to be taught to hate and fear…to hate all the people your relatives hate." Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 18, 2017

It got drummed into their dear little ears. (Apologies to Rodgers and Hammerstein)

Feb. 18, 2017

Flapper: "It has to be drummed in your dear little ear" is the way I remember it. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

That's why there are no "quotes." And the apology.

Feb. 20, 2017

Flapper: No need. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

The apology is a matter of good form, aimed at Rogers and Hammerstein for effeweseekinup their song.

Feb. 20, 2017

Flapper: They are both dead. Why apologize to them? Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

Is there a Chinese religion? I thought that had been beaten out of them by recent regimes. The large Falun Dafa spiritual group is very unpopular with the government and apparently subject to serious abuses. It's doubtful that ordinary Chinese have any knowledge of or interest in Tibetan Buddhism. Thus a religious motive for these students' behavior is unlikely.

It is possible that the Chinese government is supporting these students on the expectation that they will return home and 'make China great'. If so, there may be a financial or patriotic incentive for the students to protest.

Feb. 18, 2017

swell: If what you suggest is true, I would say the motive is fear of the Chinese government, rather than patriotism. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 18, 2017

Just who is running the show in the US? If those Chinese students don't like features of campus life in this nation, they need to go elsewhere. And why do they spend so much to attend US universities? We must assume they think their knowledge and contacts are worth the cost.

If UCSD caves in to this assault on free speech by guest students, it will be the saddest day so far (there have been many sad days there already) in its history. No, foreign students should never be allowed to dictate the terms of their study or life. They are, we must remember, guests of this nation.

Feb. 18, 2017

And just why is the UC system allowing any foreign students to attend. Is not the UC system taxpayer supported? Did we run out of American students that need (and qualify for) a college education? Should we not invest in our children and insure they have access to education before we import children from another country? Just wondering.

Feb. 19, 2017

AlexClarke: There I disagree with you. Worldwide, universities must welcome students from other countries. Reason: it is part of the educational process, and essential to the nation's foreign relations programs. UCSD, with its technological bent, is especially important in bringing in foreign students, particularly from Asia. Remember: many stay in the U.S. -- particularly Silicon Valley. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 19, 2017

don bauder, I agree with you 100 percent. While in high school my wife had the opportunity to go to France as a foreign exchange student. When she had the opportunity to return in college to study for a year, she jumped at it. She often said it was probably the most important year in her education. It had enough of an impact the when our daughter had the same type of opportunity, she didn't need much encouraged to take advantage of it.

Feb. 20, 2017

danfogel: I always regretted that I didn't study abroad for a year. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

When I was in college, the state funded about 90% of the UC system. That was almost 40 yrs ago. Now the state provides less than half of that; the last figure I saw was about 43 percent of last year's funding. So, yes, it is partly taxpayer funded. But it is not as if foreign student get in for free. Resident student tuition this year is about $13,500, while foreign student pay a "nonresident supplemental tuition" of almost $27K, so full tuition is $40k, so they pay a price to attend. BTW, less than 10% of the student population in made up of international students. FYI, the freshman admission rate last year for UCSD was about 35percent. The only schools lower were UCLA and Berkeley, with rates half of that.

Feb. 19, 2017

While that figure of state support having declined over the years is correct, it doesn't tell the whole story. The UC (and the Cal State system, too) campuses are doing things other than educating on a scale that is huge. They are "research universities", and now see their mission as research primarily, while doing some undergraduate education. If you find that at least mildly offensive, as I do, it is the three campuses you mention that are the worst offenders. Oh, I know the schools will vigorously deny that they don't give more than minimal attention to undergraduates, and state that the educational mission is taken very seriously. But their actions speak louder than words. As a UC alum myself, I get an annual report from one of the departments on my campus, and it usually makes little or no mention of its educational functions. Whenever it hires a new faculty member, the resume of his/her experience is all about research, and rarely makes mention of teaching ability.

So, the taxpayers are still picking up the largest part of the tab for the teaching work done, despite the substantial tuition paid by residents, and even larger tab paid by non-resident students (including foreign students.)

Feb. 19, 2017

Perhaps I should clarify my point. Ninety one percent of the student in the UC system are American students. Only 2/3 of those are from in state. We moved to San Diego in 1976, so having been a taxpayer for the majority of that time, both my California tax dollars as well as my federal tax dollars, have gone to support the UC system. And as, such I have no more problem with the 9 percent of the foreign students than I do with the 30 percent out of state students, all of whom pay triple the tuition of in state students. That is it, the only point I was making. As someone who has paid their fair share, I don’t have a problem with foreign students getting an education in the UC or Cal State system. I also don’t believe that foreign students in the UC/CalState system are what is responsible for a lack in college education for today’s youth. It is, I believe, are far more complicated problem. As to your feelings towards California’s universities turning into "research universities", I really don’t have an opinion either way because, in all honesty, far from being even slightly offended, I simply don’t care either way. I mean no offense to someone such as yourself who does, it is just that at this point in my life, I really don’t care either way.

Feb. 20, 2017

I took no offense. But you may overlook the fact that the UC campuses, in the short run, have only about so many undergrad openings each year. When some of those are taken by out-of-staters and foreigners, there are fewer openings for in-state students, whose parents have paid taxes to support the UC for most or all of their lives. One thing done during this Napolitano reign at UC was to sharply expand the percentage of the undergrad student body from out-of-state. That, obviously, brought in more money from tuition, and supposedly helped the campuses keep up their staffing. Now that the economic crisis is behind us, are they going back to something like the historic percentage of students from in-state? That's not apparent at all.

The low priority of undergrad education in the bigger picture of things is why students are getting shortchanged. Research is running the show, bringing in funds to finance itself, and taking the attention and energy of both faculty and administration. They simply cannot pursue research at today's level of intensity and be dedicated educators too. Something has to give, and that is undergrad education, as evidenced by lecture classes as large as 700 students, students taught by overworked and underpaid graduate students, and overcrowded residence facilities.

That offends me.

Feb. 20, 2017

Not saying you are wrong, just saying that when the UC admitted 14.5 percent more freshman students for the fall of 2016 than for the fall 2015 and the number of California resident freshmen admitted to the UC increased by 15.1 percent for the fall of 2016 vs. the fall of 2015 and the number of nonresident students admitted to the UC for fall of 2016 increased by 13.1 percent, I just don’t feel the need to get all worked up over it.

The number of undergrad enrollments has actually increased in the last 5 years, from 80,289 for the fall of 2012 up to 105,671 for the fall of 2016. From what I have read in 2012, non residents made up about 10 percent of the enrollment and last year that figure was about 15 percent. You mention the parents who have paid taxes and whose kids can't get in. What of us who pay those same taxes, maybe some of us more than others, and have a kid who didn't choose to attend a UC university? Can we have some of our money back? My points are these. Should there be a cap on non resident/foreign students? I don’t know. And if there is an “official” cap, what should it be? Should it be 15%, or 10%? How about even a 5% cap? Who should be the ones to decide? Bottom line for me is that you have every right to your own opinion and to be offended by what is going on if you choose to be. Personally, as I said, I personally really just don't care either way.

Feb. 20, 2017

danfogel: One thing that interests me: with this big gain in number of students, what is the size of the average class now? I suspect that the size of the faculty has not kept up with enrollments, and classroom size has gone up. That may not be good. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

Visduh: I am with you, Visduh. Research should not be running the show. It is important, but not ALL important. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

danfogel: I do care. I am disgusted by the low regard that education has at many universities. In his final speech, Eisenhower warned about universities depending for succor on government paying for research. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

don bauder The last I read, earlier this month, the UC system has a budget of about $25 billion. Of that, about $8.5 billion comes from federal funds, but only just over 1/3 of that, about $3 billion goes towards research funding.. That's only about 12 percent of the total budget. What percentage of the budget for research do you think should come from federal funding?

Feb. 20, 2017

danfogel: It's not so much that it is 12 percent of the budget. It's the percentage of faculty members' time spent on research at the expense of education that bothers me. I realize there is no scientific way to measure this. It is professors buying their way out of teaching so the university can rake in research money that bothers me. The widespread abuse of grad students and adjuncts greatly results from the time full professors spend on research. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

Visduh: You are correct: so many state universities -- not just in California -- exist for research, and faculties are contemptuous of students in many cases. Faculty members up for tenure are judged on research they have had published. Of course, universities make money off that research -- or hope to. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

danfogel: I would have guessed the admission rate at UCSD would have been lower. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

Having just experienced the Chinese state newspapers and limits on internet searches, it is obvious that residents of Chine who haven't figured out a work-around or traveled outside China understand that the Dalai Lama is an unlawful troublemaker seeking to separate Tibet from China. This may be what the parents believe. Pretty disappointing that exposure to the UCSD community hasn't broadened the perspective of the graduates though.

Feb. 20, 2017

KMW: Student exchange programs are educational -- both for the foreign students, and for the American students socializing with the visitors. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

Visduh: Agreed. Foreign students are guests. They can't dictate to us. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 23, 2017

Visduh: UCSD should not cave in to foreign students -- definitely. But it should not cave in to American students, either, on controversial issues. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 18, 2017

True. But a number of cases of stifling speech by unpopular speakers have occurred there, and at most other UC campuses. It is a scandal, and gives the right-wing talkers plenty of fodder.

Feb. 18, 2017

Suppressing the right to assemble or to speak freely isn't fodder, it's un-American. And you are correct it is scandalous that tax supported University Administrators shrink from vigorous debate especially when the opinions expressed are counter to their world views.

Feb. 18, 2017

JustWondering: State universities these days are getting less and less money from government sources, particularly state sources. So I suspect that university administrations may quietly discourage students from bringing controversial speakers to the campus, lest they upset politicians.

Magazines put out by state universities are full of bland fare. That may be one reason. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 23, 2017

Visduh: Exactly, by chasing off rightwing speakers, the Cal system merely strengthens the right. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 18, 2017

JustWondering: Precisely. Stifling free expression is destructive in so many ways. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 18, 2017

According to the original article, the 'Chinese students' consist of only one person named Wang. The Chinese Students and Scholars Association has 5 other members, none of whom would respond to questions. The International Campaign for Tibet and Robert Barnett, the director of the modern Tibetan studies program at Columbia support the Dalai Lama presentation and refer to interference from the Chinese government.

This is not a student protest, it is a proxy for the Chinese government.

Feb. 18, 2017

swell: If you are right and there is only one protester, then I shouldn't have used the plural word. However, I am not convinced that there is only one protester. Nor am I convinced that this was a hoax. When I was editor of a university newspaper, I tried to be alert for hoaxes, but I still got my leg pulled a few times. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 19, 2017

Uh, oh . . . Alternative facts?

Planted by RRRs? Common tactic.

Feb. 19, 2017

Flapper: Use of alternative facts are deflection tactics. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

Integrity comes from integrate, particularly applicable to ingrates.

Feb. 19, 2017

Flapper: I don't consider student protesters ingrates. Young people at universities should challenge the status quo. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

The statement is a FOUNDATION that supports the context. There are ingrates everywhere--by definition lacking in integrated minds.

Feb. 20, 2017

Flapper: I am not sure that ingrates' minds are any more or less integrated than other people's. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

Hummm, inte-rest-ing. Even in the sense of having vs not having their essacheyetee together?

Feb. 20, 2017

Flapper: If it's a choice of being a have or a have-not, I will take the former. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

Ridiculous fear of Monks with powerful gift for teaching peaceful, positive, spiritually independent thinking. Communist/Capitalist/Protectionist Politics; A mindset of support for far-reaching global domination, by select superpowers. Free Tibet!! Free America too!

Feb. 19, 2017

shirleyberan: Good idea. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

Flapper: Right on. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

FREE TIBET

Feb. 19, 2017

mromano18: Carry that sign around, asking for donations. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

UCSD is supposed to be a public California university, but if you walked around the campus today you might feel you're in the Tiananmen Square. Tuition keeps going up... why do we permit a public university to have so many foreign students? We (Americans) complain about; 1) Not having enough engineers to 'compete' and 2) Tuition is too high.

Well if we would make our public universities for our citizens, and not those of the children of foreign millionaires, we would solve both problems. Let them send their kids to private universities and get the money-drunk public universities out of the international education business. Maybe the only exception being international students studying for a doctorate.

The infiltration of our public higher education campuses by foreign nationals is a major cause of America's decline in competitiveness as well as exacerbating the student loan bubble.

Feb. 19, 2017

Ponzi: I have written several pieces claiming that H-1B lowers the salary levels of all engineers, but I do not oppose foreign students at state universities. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

My wife and I did our graduate work at SDSU. I don't remember that many foreign students, at least those that would have been obvious. We only actually knew two. They were sisters from South America, Argentina I think, but it has been a long time, nearly 40 yrs. I haven't been near the campus in a long time, probably close to 15 years at least, but I have no doubts it is different now. I don't know what the SDSU specific rate is, but the total number of foreign student in the whole system is less than half of that in the UC system, only 3 or 4 percent. Like don bauder, I take no issue in general with foreign student at state universities. You are of course entitled to your opinion. I just happen to have a different one.

Feb. 20, 2017

danfogel: Of course, SDSU should be less of a research institution than UCSD. That is the difference between the two systems. But research hogs the show too much at SDSU, too. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

Dan, can you cite your source; "the total number of foreign student in the whole system is less than half of that in the UC system, only 3 or 4 percent."

Feb. 20, 2017

Its a for profit corp..I went there...the foreign kids don't pay tuition...ithe regents double dip...its just a money machine...its not public...do some DD

Feb. 22, 2017

dante: UC's regents should be investigated for abuses. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

TV ad this weekend claims that San Francisco City College is turning tuition-free. How nice for them.

Feb. 20, 2017

shirleyberan: I am not aware of this. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

Eric Nelson: The Breitbart message is offense to you and to me, but the man has a right to speak. After all, a Breitbart alum is next to, and swaying ,the president…tragically. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

Wecta Wodanson: That event was repugnant -- against everything we should be believing in. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

Daniel Hicks: Good points. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

Daniel Hicks2: There I disagree strongly. I am not a religious person, but I think the pope is doing a wonderful job, even though I may disagree with him at times. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

When the Dali Lama speaks, he very rarely makes political statements. His message is entirely about compassion and how to transform ourselves into better human beings. It's true that he is the exiled leader of Tibet but he has effectively renounced that role and is now entirely a spiritual leader. The Chinese student(s) that is objecting to him being the commencement speaker is not representing the vast number of students that are very happy and excited for a chance to hear the Dali Lama in person. The Chinese student has a right (while in the US) to voice his opposition to the Dali Lama but the majority of other students support the Dali Lama and his message, and want him to be the commencement speaker. It's a rare opportunity that should not be missed!

Feb. 20, 2017

amorpheous: Of course the Chinese students -- or student -- have a right to speak out. But I will bet the Chinese student(s) will lose this one. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

Robert Ostrove: Student protesters should shelve their tender sensibilities. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 20, 2017

What this Forum needs is an expert on present-day China who can tell us how the culture is changing, and in which direction it is headed.

Feb. 20, 2017

Flapper: And I am no expert on China. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

Grasshopper could understand his own actions After the correct class. Dalai Lama's written and published work should be required reading.The student must also show signs of awareness, comprehension and compassion to pass.

Feb. 20, 2017

shirleyberan: Required reading for whom? Everybody? Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

The pressure put on the Dalai Lama is from the Chinese Communist government that is exerting its new found economic power to try to pressure other countries to tow the communist Chinese government party line on issues.

The Chinese Communist government has sparked controversy by trying to dictate to Chinese Americans who and what could be included in the Chinese New Years Parade in San Francisco despite some American government funding that is involved.

Ironically, most of the Communist Chinese elite send their children to be educated in America. The only daughter (Xi Mingze) of Chinese Leader Xi Jinping was studying at Harvard under an assumed name with Chinese Security Services attending also to protect her. There, she was exposed to classes and seminars where the Chinese Communist Party in Turmoil was one of the topics of discussion.

UCSD appears to be the victim of instructions from the Chinese Communist Party to try to stop the appearance of the Dalai Lama. USCD should not fall for this heavy handed international censorship. Tibet was/is an independent country brutally enslaved by murder, torture, imprisonment and dislocation by the Chinese Communist government. Tibet is not considered a part of Communist China at all by countries around the world.

If anything, there should be a special ceremony at the UCSD graduation honoring and in solidarity with the innocent Chinese students massacred by the Chinese Military for protesting for Democracy: open and transparent government, free multiparty elections, freedom of the press, freedom of speech, freedom of assembly at the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. That information was immediately censored in Communist China.. Try pulling that up on the Internet in Communist China and see if you don't get a knock on your door and stuffed into a trunk of a car or military vehicle and taken to some Communist Chinese Gulag.

Feb. 20, 2017

SportsFan0000: You make a number of poignant points there. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

May be, but what are SF's sources? I don't doubt them, but would like to know where SF got the information.

Feb. 22, 2017

Flapper: You always insist on sources. This is a blog, not a library. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

Dalai Lama preaches peace and love. (Free Tibet, anyway.) If Chinese students (or their parents) don't like hearing him, they should go to the student union for a coffee and come back when it's over. When one of my kids graduated from UCSD, I had to sit through a Bill Clinton speech, which I definitely did not appreciate. Bill was upstaged,however, by a fiery woman student activist who supported the then-controversial "UCSD Charter School" and African-American professor of music Cecil Lytle who had resigned over the University's initial failure to support the charter school on its campus.

Feb. 20, 2017

monaghan: I would like to have seen Bill Clinton being upstaged. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

Great sensitivity on this issue all around. I am proud to be a contributor to this excellent discussion. It remains undisputed that only one student has stood up to protest the Dalai Lama. Most of us here and worldwide are interested in what he has to say.

I will add a personal anecdote about His Holiness. He has a hobby. He enjoys repairing watches. He has a variety of tools for that purpose and works with fine watches (not digital electronic devices but real watches with gears and springs). I believe that his hobby grounds him in reality. His proclamations and observations have always come from an earthy core that we can all understand. He is one of us.

Feb. 20, 2017

swell: That's high and well-deserved praise for a great man. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

He is the best of us.

Feb. 21, 2017

shirleyberan: There are some others who rank with him, but I can't think of their names now. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

Perhaps the Chinese students who believe that having the Dalai Lama speak is being "culturally disrespectful" should engage in a dialogue with some Chinese Tibetan students to broaden their Chinese cultural understanding. Wait—what's that you say —there are no Tibetan students? Oh, that's right - it's nigh on impossible for Tibetans to get a passport from the Chinese government to allow them to study abroad. Perhaps some insight into "cultural disrespect" could gained from this article: https://www.pri.org/stories/2014-10-23/chinese-tourists-treat-tibetans-zoo-animals-photos . Of course, Of course, some might dismiss this Public Radio International story as pure propaganda...

Feb. 21, 2017

Markk: I didn't know Tibetan students are, essentially, banned from studying abroad. I guess if I had pondered the matter, I should have known. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

They find it almost impossible to get a passport. Here's a story about Human Rights Watch's report on ethnic minority discrimination in China: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/china/11735590/China-restricts-passports-for-Tibetans.html

Feb. 22, 2017

Markk: Ethnic discrimination is only one of the outrages existing in China today. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 23, 2017

The second an intellect becomes fixed, it is no longer.

Feb. 21, 2017

Flapper: True. And when an election is fixed, it is no longer an election. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

Joe Digma: American students should be able to study and socialize with students from other countries, including communists. But are the Chinese students communists? Is the Chinese economy communistic? Crony capitalism is rampant in China. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

Leilei Zhang: I agree with you. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

Dave Zerkle: Yes, foreign students pay higher tuitions, but that isn't the only reason they are permitted to study here. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

Phil Common: I think somebody armed and prone to violence should be banned from speaking at our universities --in fact, everywhere. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

Joe Digma: Foreign students may be taking up space that could be taken by an American, but so what? The positives of foreign students outweigh the negatives…by far. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

Robert Balcom: I agree, and if you actually work for the Department of Homeland Security, that's all the better. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

"UC's regents should be investigated for abuses. Best, Don Bauder"

Anybody know where to find a copy of the ORIGINAL Charter for the University of California?

Anybody know what changes to it have been made and when?

Fifty shades of PUC . . .

Feb. 22, 2017

Flapper: Anybody know why some have left the regents with the Cal system not even giving them a note of praise? Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

We're all ears, m'dear!

Feb. 22, 2017

Flapper: Sticky fingers were probably the explanation, but since I have not confirmed that, I am not going to name the ex-regents. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 23, 2017

"Flapper: And I am no expert on China. Best, Don Bauder"

I wasn't implying that you are weren't--only that "we" need one.

Feb. 22, 2017

Flapper: Maybe we can hire one. It won't be Peter Navarro. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

I disagree. I don't think we need an expert on China, or the Dalai Lama, or UCSD for this issue. That's giving too much power to one or two people who want to stop free speech. I think all we need to know is that the Dalai Lama is certainly someone who is not going to say anything hateful or extreme and is well-known enough to be qualified to be a commencement speaker. Should be the end of the discussion. I don't think we should have to understand and respect every single concern of every single person who doesn't want someone else to be heard.

Feb. 23, 2017

"UCSD Charter School"

I have mixed emotions about charter schools.

Feb. 22, 2017

Flapper: Ditto. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

"Its a for profit corp..I went there...the foreign kids don't pay tuition...ithe regents double dip...its just a money machine...its not public...do some DD"

I need some help doing my Due Diligence. Where do I find the information upon which these conclusions are based?

Feb. 22, 2017

Flapper: Start with Google. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 23, 2017

Question was intended for the author of the quote. That is always the case; it's a matter of form.

Feb. 26, 2017

"Great men" and women tend not to think of themselves as such.

But THEY PERSIST!

Feb. 22, 2017

Flapper: You mean they continue being great men and women? Why not? Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

Citizens of the Earth are not "foreign." Except, maybe, in outer space.

Feb. 22, 2017

Flapper: Supposedly you would abolish the word "foreign." It is a perfectly useful word. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 22, 2017

"Flapper: You always insist on sources. This is a blog, not a library. Best, Don Bauder"

May be, but it could rise UP! Open a window and yell . . .

Feb. 22, 2017

Flapper: At my age, I can't take on more than I am doing now. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 23, 2017

"Flapper: True. And when an election is fixed, it is no longer an election. Best, Don Bauder"

A subset of the phenomenon.

Feb. 22, 2017

"Flapper: You mean they continue being great men and women? Why not? Best, Don Bauder"

It goes with the nature of what "greatness" is--and is not.

Feb. 22, 2017

Flapper: Even our great presidents are flawed. Teddy Roosevelt broke up the trusts and established many national parks. But he was a war monger and a racist. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 23, 2017

"Flapper: Supposedly you would abolish the word "foreign." It is a perfectly useful word. Best, Don Bauder"

Just how and on what presumption do you suppose? Methinks . . .

Feb. 22, 2017

Flapper: One guy at the podium looks like he is asleep. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 23, 2017

"That is bad. Whatever happened to free speech -- particularly on university campuses? Best, Don Bauder"

Thank you Don. Free speech is paramount.

Feb. 23, 2017

ImJustABill: Amen. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 23, 2017

"Flapper: At my age, I can't take on more than I am doing now. Best, Don Bauder"

I resemble that remark!

What you're doing is more than most people do at any age. I can imagine that you spend many hours doing your due diligence here and elsewhere. Just give equal time to exercise.

What could happen here, however, is that the participants think of this gift as more than a mere blog. They/we could consider it at obligation to respond to responses rather than let issued just fade away after they/we've popped off, and at least reach some kind of conclusion with respect to your original piece.

That's not so say there should be no digressions, particularly when something in the piece or the discussion sparks an idea; only that the original thought should not be abandoned, hanging . . .

Feb. 23, 2017

Flapper: I don't have a problem with digressions. Some blogmeisters ban digressions, but not me. I think some of our most interesting comments are digressions. And what some consider digressions are in fact related to the topic -- just a little distant. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 23, 2017

Agreed.

Feb. 23, 2017

Ratna Shakya: I didn't know there was a surge in interest in Buddhism among Chinese students. I think the surge is healthy. Best, Don Bauder

Feb. 27, 2017

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