Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Tijuana’s new public bus system – not great once you leave downtown

Does current mayor Juan Manuel Gastélum want it to fail?

"Broken glass, cable theft, fiber optic theft, theft of the ducts for the electrical system, and graffiti.”
"Broken glass, cable theft, fiber optic theft, theft of the ducts for the electrical system, and graffiti.”

Shattered glass. Sandstone rocks. Soiled clothing. Human feces. Exposed electrical cables hanging from ceilings. Trash strewn along the floor. These are generally not the things one imagines when newly built ‘modern transportation’ comes to mind. But, for parts of Tijuana, this has become the reality. The future of the city’s Sistema Integral de Transporte de Tijuana, or SITT (pronounced seat), is uncertain thanks to the political self-interest at play.

Fifteen bus stations (47 were built in toto) have been vandalized.

The new public bus system - which cost federal and state government, as well as international investors, about $60 million to construct - was designed to transform public transit with air-conditioned buses, a smart-card payment system, security cameras, and Wi-Fi. Estimates posited it would serve 120,000 passengers per day.

Station interior. "To hurt a station is to hurt our heritage as citizens.”

While Centro’s (downtown Tijuana’s) bus stations appear in good condition, a ten-mile jaunt from the San Ysidro border crossing along Via Rapida (the city’s main north-south highway) towards Colonia Insurgentes, in the Tijuana’s southeast, tells a different story about the bus system. Bus stations, decorated by taggers, are in decay - at least one seemingly with a bullet hole in its shattered glass. On social media, locals have suggested the bus stops should be used for community centers, live theater, and live music.

“How long until they repair the stations?"

"Broken glass, cable theft, fiber optic theft, theft of the ducts for the electrical system, and graffiti,” the system’s general secretary Arturo Aguirre listed the damages at a recent city council meeting.

Some of the stations act as ovens to bake the human feces inside. One sullied station has yellow concrete barriers closing it off entirely from all traffic, including buses. While public buses run along Via Rapida, most of the stations never opened or are currently out of service. Some appear to be half-built, though much of the glass has simply been broken and anything of value on the inside stripped.

According to El Sol de Tijuana, fifteen bus stations (47 were built in toto) have been vandalized with four “seriously affected.” Officials estimate the damages already exceed more than one million pesos. While most of the funds for the system came from state and federal government, the municipal government must maintain the stations and repair the damages.

SITT representatives cites the lack of security at the stations for the desecration. "The stations are being vandalized and every day that passes they deteriorate further. They are practically losses for the city council," said the General Secretariat of Government, who noted that from November to December 2016 private security was contracted for 18,000 pesos per week.

Previous mayor Jorge Astiazarán, from the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), had even assigned municipal police to protect the stations. But the current mayor as of November 30, 2016, National Action Party’s (PAN) Juan Manuel Gastélum, received support from the city’s transit businesses, known collectively as transportistas or la mafia transportistas. He withdrew security for the stations.

"The problems that we have today could have been avoided,” the General Secretary of the government explained. “It is very easy to break the glass [at night], because the stations are unmanned...”

He added: "To hurt a station is to hurt our heritage as citizens.”

Those who believed the current administration’s perceived alliance with the established transportation industry would stall the city-wide planned modern busing system were correct. Critics cite the damages to the many stations as evidence of the new administration’s lack of interest in SITT, which was originally announced to the public in September 2015.

In an opinion piece appearing in Uniradio early this month, the paper asks: “How long until the government offers a quality service?”

As well: “How long until they repair the stations? And how long until they punish the crooks who destroy the city?”

Aguirre notes that the city is taking care of the stations that are being used by passengers.

Buses and riders have also been targeted. Late last month, in Colonia El Niño to the city’s east, a group of at least ten men armed with bats, sticks and stones forced passengers off a bus and damaged it.

“They have vandalized six vehicles,” Aguirre said at the time, who noted some passengers have been shoved off busses. It does not appear, however, as if the passengers were robbed. The vandals told the passengers to leave or suffer the consequences.

Public bus officials, who claimed to know that private transportation provider ‘Altisa’ was responsible for the damages, said they would not remain apathetic, demanding that the director of transportation, Javier Salas, “se ponga las pilas”. (translation: ‘get with it’)

In Centro and Zona Norte, however, SITT seems to be the modern bus system promised by the previous administration. On a Sunday, I saw the Centro bus station - in pristine condition - filled with about 15 people. Just north, a bus picked up riders at the system’s Zona Norte two-story main station along Avenida Revolución.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

South by Southwest Cinema, Achieving your Zero Waste Potential

Events May 31-June 3, 2020
Comments
1

Tijuana people should be ashamed of themselves, all the more reason for TruMcP to tighly close off Mexico from the USA, good job morons... Truly only a third world country!!!😢

March 19, 2019

Sign in to comment

Sign in

"Broken glass, cable theft, fiber optic theft, theft of the ducts for the electrical system, and graffiti.”
"Broken glass, cable theft, fiber optic theft, theft of the ducts for the electrical system, and graffiti.”

Shattered glass. Sandstone rocks. Soiled clothing. Human feces. Exposed electrical cables hanging from ceilings. Trash strewn along the floor. These are generally not the things one imagines when newly built ‘modern transportation’ comes to mind. But, for parts of Tijuana, this has become the reality. The future of the city’s Sistema Integral de Transporte de Tijuana, or SITT (pronounced seat), is uncertain thanks to the political self-interest at play.

Fifteen bus stations (47 were built in toto) have been vandalized.

The new public bus system - which cost federal and state government, as well as international investors, about $60 million to construct - was designed to transform public transit with air-conditioned buses, a smart-card payment system, security cameras, and Wi-Fi. Estimates posited it would serve 120,000 passengers per day.

Station interior. "To hurt a station is to hurt our heritage as citizens.”

While Centro’s (downtown Tijuana’s) bus stations appear in good condition, a ten-mile jaunt from the San Ysidro border crossing along Via Rapida (the city’s main north-south highway) towards Colonia Insurgentes, in the Tijuana’s southeast, tells a different story about the bus system. Bus stations, decorated by taggers, are in decay - at least one seemingly with a bullet hole in its shattered glass. On social media, locals have suggested the bus stops should be used for community centers, live theater, and live music.

“How long until they repair the stations?"

"Broken glass, cable theft, fiber optic theft, theft of the ducts for the electrical system, and graffiti,” the system’s general secretary Arturo Aguirre listed the damages at a recent city council meeting.

Some of the stations act as ovens to bake the human feces inside. One sullied station has yellow concrete barriers closing it off entirely from all traffic, including buses. While public buses run along Via Rapida, most of the stations never opened or are currently out of service. Some appear to be half-built, though much of the glass has simply been broken and anything of value on the inside stripped.

According to El Sol de Tijuana, fifteen bus stations (47 were built in toto) have been vandalized with four “seriously affected.” Officials estimate the damages already exceed more than one million pesos. While most of the funds for the system came from state and federal government, the municipal government must maintain the stations and repair the damages.

SITT representatives cites the lack of security at the stations for the desecration. "The stations are being vandalized and every day that passes they deteriorate further. They are practically losses for the city council," said the General Secretariat of Government, who noted that from November to December 2016 private security was contracted for 18,000 pesos per week.

Previous mayor Jorge Astiazarán, from the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI), had even assigned municipal police to protect the stations. But the current mayor as of November 30, 2016, National Action Party’s (PAN) Juan Manuel Gastélum, received support from the city’s transit businesses, known collectively as transportistas or la mafia transportistas. He withdrew security for the stations.

"The problems that we have today could have been avoided,” the General Secretary of the government explained. “It is very easy to break the glass [at night], because the stations are unmanned...”

He added: "To hurt a station is to hurt our heritage as citizens.”

Those who believed the current administration’s perceived alliance with the established transportation industry would stall the city-wide planned modern busing system were correct. Critics cite the damages to the many stations as evidence of the new administration’s lack of interest in SITT, which was originally announced to the public in September 2015.

In an opinion piece appearing in Uniradio early this month, the paper asks: “How long until the government offers a quality service?”

As well: “How long until they repair the stations? And how long until they punish the crooks who destroy the city?”

Aguirre notes that the city is taking care of the stations that are being used by passengers.

Buses and riders have also been targeted. Late last month, in Colonia El Niño to the city’s east, a group of at least ten men armed with bats, sticks and stones forced passengers off a bus and damaged it.

“They have vandalized six vehicles,” Aguirre said at the time, who noted some passengers have been shoved off busses. It does not appear, however, as if the passengers were robbed. The vandals told the passengers to leave or suffer the consequences.

Public bus officials, who claimed to know that private transportation provider ‘Altisa’ was responsible for the damages, said they would not remain apathetic, demanding that the director of transportation, Javier Salas, “se ponga las pilas”. (translation: ‘get with it’)

In Centro and Zona Norte, however, SITT seems to be the modern bus system promised by the previous administration. On a Sunday, I saw the Centro bus station - in pristine condition - filled with about 15 people. Just north, a bus picked up riders at the system’s Zona Norte two-story main station along Avenida Revolución.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Behind the swastikas in Santee

Dustin Hart from Alpine touched a sensitive spot
Next Article

The quarantine games

“How Can We Make Settlers of Catan Into a Drinking Game?”
Comments
1

Tijuana people should be ashamed of themselves, all the more reason for TruMcP to tighly close off Mexico from the USA, good job morons... Truly only a third world country!!!😢

March 19, 2019

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close