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Mustang hate

Social punishment for burnout on Mira Mesa Boulevard

“Prepare for some repair bills to that Mustang bud … your s-its gonna be scratched the f-ck up, people know where you live,” read one of the instant message threats sent to Danny Diaz at 5:19 p.m. on Sunday.

Diaz, 22, drove his 2014 Ford Mustang to the “Cars Coffee -N- Doughnuts San Diego” gathering on Sept. 25 at 6755 Mira Mesa Blvd. He said that he hung out with between 20-30 people, then took off around 9:30 a.m. — but too quickly.

Danny Diaz

“[Diaz] proceeded to pull a solid 30 to 45 second burnout,” said Brad, 38, the head coordinator for the gathering.

Diaz’s account was different: “It was only maybe 5 seconds, what’s the big deal?”

After Diaz took off from the venue, the moderator of Cars Coffee -N- Doughnuts San Diego posted a 3-part photo montage on their Facebook page.

“It was [a photo of] my license plate, my car and my face,” said Diaz, “that is when the hatin’ started.”

Below the image was a caption that read: TO THE OWNER OF THE BLACK MUSTANG NAMED DANNY DIAZ WHOM JUST LEFT THE MEET AND DID THE BURNOUT ON MIRA MESA BLVD – YOU ARE NOT WELCOME BACK THAT WAS ABSOLUTELY UNCALLED FOR AND THE STAFF IS HANDING YOUR LICENSE PLATE, INSTAGRAM AND ADDRESS TO THE LOCAL AUTHORITIES WE HAVE PHOTOS OF YOU AND YOUR VEHICLE

“It was only after his confessions of his actions that we posted a photo of his vehicle to one of our other social media accounts,” Brad said.

Diaz said that he received about seven direct messages from “haters.” He added that the majority of the “trolling” was found on back and forth messages under the shared and reposted posts of Diaz’s photos on Facebook and Instagram.

Not all posts were anti-Diaz sentiments.

“I bet if some rich guy in a old school Ford GT did a burnout at your meet you wouldn’t be mad,” posted John Klarich on the thread.

Diaz said that the organizers even tagged his place of employment and Kar Motorsports (a shop that he frequents) to the “burnout post.”

Brad and his friends that organize car meets usually coordinate with local businesses to draw large amounts of traffic (allegedly over a thousand cars at a recent meet in North County) into their parking lots. Businesses like the money that comes in from the traffic, but are said to not like the stigma attached to the car scene: revving engines, bumping sound systems, street racing and burnouts.

On many car-meet digital and print fliers, they all share the same rule: PLEASE RESPECT THIS MEET AT ALL TIMES — SHOWBOATING WILL NOT BE TOLERATED

“The burnout was taking place in the street,” Diaz said, “they don’t have any jurisdiction.”

“This has been an ongoing problem that event organizers are trying to combat,” Brad said. “The driver in question at no time has denied to us his actions, nor has he apologized for his actions.”

“I’m going back (to the next car meet). I don’t care,” Diaz said in regards to him being “not welcomed or banned” from future car meets.

One more photo of Diaz’s “440 horsepower car” surfaced online. On this photo a police car is parked behind his Mustang with the lightbar on. Diaz said that the photo "was taken a long time ago."

As of press time, the San Diego Police Department has not responded on the charges that can arise when a driver is caught burning out on the city streets.

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“Prepare for some repair bills to that Mustang bud … your s-its gonna be scratched the f-ck up, people know where you live,” read one of the instant message threats sent to Danny Diaz at 5:19 p.m. on Sunday.

Diaz, 22, drove his 2014 Ford Mustang to the “Cars Coffee -N- Doughnuts San Diego” gathering on Sept. 25 at 6755 Mira Mesa Blvd. He said that he hung out with between 20-30 people, then took off around 9:30 a.m. — but too quickly.

Danny Diaz

“[Diaz] proceeded to pull a solid 30 to 45 second burnout,” said Brad, 38, the head coordinator for the gathering.

Diaz’s account was different: “It was only maybe 5 seconds, what’s the big deal?”

After Diaz took off from the venue, the moderator of Cars Coffee -N- Doughnuts San Diego posted a 3-part photo montage on their Facebook page.

“It was [a photo of] my license plate, my car and my face,” said Diaz, “that is when the hatin’ started.”

Below the image was a caption that read: TO THE OWNER OF THE BLACK MUSTANG NAMED DANNY DIAZ WHOM JUST LEFT THE MEET AND DID THE BURNOUT ON MIRA MESA BLVD – YOU ARE NOT WELCOME BACK THAT WAS ABSOLUTELY UNCALLED FOR AND THE STAFF IS HANDING YOUR LICENSE PLATE, INSTAGRAM AND ADDRESS TO THE LOCAL AUTHORITIES WE HAVE PHOTOS OF YOU AND YOUR VEHICLE

“It was only after his confessions of his actions that we posted a photo of his vehicle to one of our other social media accounts,” Brad said.

Diaz said that he received about seven direct messages from “haters.” He added that the majority of the “trolling” was found on back and forth messages under the shared and reposted posts of Diaz’s photos on Facebook and Instagram.

Not all posts were anti-Diaz sentiments.

“I bet if some rich guy in a old school Ford GT did a burnout at your meet you wouldn’t be mad,” posted John Klarich on the thread.

Diaz said that the organizers even tagged his place of employment and Kar Motorsports (a shop that he frequents) to the “burnout post.”

Brad and his friends that organize car meets usually coordinate with local businesses to draw large amounts of traffic (allegedly over a thousand cars at a recent meet in North County) into their parking lots. Businesses like the money that comes in from the traffic, but are said to not like the stigma attached to the car scene: revving engines, bumping sound systems, street racing and burnouts.

On many car-meet digital and print fliers, they all share the same rule: PLEASE RESPECT THIS MEET AT ALL TIMES — SHOWBOATING WILL NOT BE TOLERATED

“The burnout was taking place in the street,” Diaz said, “they don’t have any jurisdiction.”

“This has been an ongoing problem that event organizers are trying to combat,” Brad said. “The driver in question at no time has denied to us his actions, nor has he apologized for his actions.”

“I’m going back (to the next car meet). I don’t care,” Diaz said in regards to him being “not welcomed or banned” from future car meets.

One more photo of Diaz’s “440 horsepower car” surfaced online. On this photo a police car is parked behind his Mustang with the lightbar on. Diaz said that the photo "was taken a long time ago."

As of press time, the San Diego Police Department has not responded on the charges that can arise when a driver is caught burning out on the city streets.

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Comments
7

What Diaz did was "Exhibition Of Speed." Vehicle Code 23109(c)

c) A person shall not engage in a motor vehicle exhibition of speed on a highway, and a person shall not aid or abet in a motor vehicle exhibition of speed on any highway.

Note: Some common acts which are treated as exhibition of speed include: burning or squealing tires or other forms of allowing tires to lose traction...

Fines start at $500 & up as well as up to 90 days in jail. A conviction for this offense is misdemeanor, and remains on their criminal record for life.

"To satisfy the element of willfulness, it is sufficient that the prosecution show the accused intended to make the tires on their car “burn rubber.” However, the prosecution does need to show that the driver intended to “exhibit” or show off to another person. The prosecution does not have to somehow prove that the defendant actually formed the desire to “show off” in his/her mind prior to, or while performing the act. The defendant's intent to impress or annoy others can be established through circumstantial evidence. The prosecution can prevail on this element simply by showing that other people were present who could view the defendant's act, even if they are people the defendant did not personally know, i.e. people in other vehicles on a public roadway or pedestrians."

Sept. 27, 2016

More proof that you can't fix stupid.

Sept. 28, 2016

Ah yes ... It was 1962 when I got my first car. Cars were practically a religion where I lived and if you didn't have a hot car you were nobody. We would gather at the very first McDonald's in Des Plaines, IL to show off for the girls and burn rubber. (that McD's is now a museum) Would it be immodest to suggest that the success of the McD chain is due to our patronage?

Grownups hated us with our blaring AM radios and nasty attitudes. Nice to see a little of the past revived.

Sept. 28, 2016

The first McDonald's restaurant was in San Bernardino, California.

None

Sept. 29, 2016

He said the first one in Des Plaines, not the first one ever.

Oct. 4, 2016

Sorry, Ray bought that from someone else. Check their web site, and visit the museum next time you're in the Chicago area.

http://corporate.mcdonalds.com/content/mcd/our_company/mcdonalds-history.html

None

Sept. 29, 2016

Ray Kroc bought the San Bernardino location from the McDonald brothers when he bought their "system." Even the location Ray Kroc built in 1953 in Downey, California was built before the one you cite in Illinois (opened in 1955): In fact, the one in Downey is still in business and it is the "oldest operating McDonald's" in the chain. A living, breathing "museum" that still serves food.

Sept. 29, 2016

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