4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

All kill the same

Seven Spots on the Sun at InnerMission Productions

Moises stopped practicing medicine at San Ysidro, a small, Central American village. Civil war lacerates the region — first the rebels, then forces backed by gringo “advisors.” Then back, then forth. All kill the same.

Moises tried to heal a tortured teenaged rebel. As a reprisal, a soldier murdered Moises’s wife Belen. That’s when Moises gave up on medicine and when a plague that only attacks children began.

Seven Spots on the Sun

To everyone’s surprise, but his above all, Moises can heal a child festering with pustules with a single touch. His legend spreads. Parents bring inflicted children from throughout the land, even the wife and child of the man who killed Belen.

Like Prospero in Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Moises has the chance for ultimate revenge. Will he follow his fury or need the “rarer action” of mercy? Martin Zimmerman’s 90-minute drama recalls the traditional corridos of Mexico — folktales often set to music – and tries to match the magic realism of Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s Cien Anos de Soledad. It is slow to come together, hard to follow at times, and often sacrifices clarity for verbal bling. In other words, it’s an ambitious, demanding piece.

Which is just the kind of script feisty InnerMission Productions would choose to begin its second full-time season. Director Carla Nell and her fully engaged group don’t get the whole play, but enough for a big, raw, and stirring evening of theater.

Two main reasons: Jorge Rodriguez’s Moises (“Moses”) is hurt. Everyone in the village has suffered grave losses; hobbling on a crutch, Moises seems to carry them all on his shoulders. Whether he’s making a fresh pineapple taste like an empyrean elixir or facing the horrors of his past, Rodriguez excels as Moises.

The other reason: Jennifer Paredes’s long-suffering Monica. Like Moises, the character makes a 180-degree shift. She’s a devoted wife battered by one revelation after another, all the while trying to hold her marriage, and her world, together. Paredes also excels (she’s really getting good!) especially when she must make high risk emotional shifts in seconds.

Sandra Ruiz and Bernardo Mazon turn in good work as Moises’s wife Belen (“Bethlehem”: the playwright never skimps on the symbolism) and Monica’s cold killer/battle-shocked husband Luis (who at one point brags how he killed children and saved bullets). The supporting cast is uneven, but all create a soundscape of chants, shouts, and screams, plus the rhythms of rituals effectively.

The design work has a kind of choreography. Nate Cargill’s lighting boasts a surprising number of arresting effects for such a small space. And Shaun Tuazon’s set’s like the Cheshire Cat: it’s there, when needed, then gone when not. A wheat-colored maze, the set looks like the humble interior of a cabin or shack. It never intrudes. At the same time, it’s packed with suggestive background details. The most appealing: fluted plastic shower curtains cut on a bias to make them — a touch of magic realism here — resemble chimes.

Playing through December 10

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

SEALS in Afghanistan, Panama, Vietnam, Grenada

Killer training in Coronado, spying for Koch in America's Cup race
Next Article

Hello granny flats, adios trees

City rule is now to add one 24-inch box tree

Moises stopped practicing medicine at San Ysidro, a small, Central American village. Civil war lacerates the region — first the rebels, then forces backed by gringo “advisors.” Then back, then forth. All kill the same.

Moises tried to heal a tortured teenaged rebel. As a reprisal, a soldier murdered Moises’s wife Belen. That’s when Moises gave up on medicine and when a plague that only attacks children began.

Seven Spots on the Sun

To everyone’s surprise, but his above all, Moises can heal a child festering with pustules with a single touch. His legend spreads. Parents bring inflicted children from throughout the land, even the wife and child of the man who killed Belen.

Like Prospero in Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Moises has the chance for ultimate revenge. Will he follow his fury or need the “rarer action” of mercy? Martin Zimmerman’s 90-minute drama recalls the traditional corridos of Mexico — folktales often set to music – and tries to match the magic realism of Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s Cien Anos de Soledad. It is slow to come together, hard to follow at times, and often sacrifices clarity for verbal bling. In other words, it’s an ambitious, demanding piece.

Which is just the kind of script feisty InnerMission Productions would choose to begin its second full-time season. Director Carla Nell and her fully engaged group don’t get the whole play, but enough for a big, raw, and stirring evening of theater.

Two main reasons: Jorge Rodriguez’s Moises (“Moses”) is hurt. Everyone in the village has suffered grave losses; hobbling on a crutch, Moises seems to carry them all on his shoulders. Whether he’s making a fresh pineapple taste like an empyrean elixir or facing the horrors of his past, Rodriguez excels as Moises.

The other reason: Jennifer Paredes’s long-suffering Monica. Like Moises, the character makes a 180-degree shift. She’s a devoted wife battered by one revelation after another, all the while trying to hold her marriage, and her world, together. Paredes also excels (she’s really getting good!) especially when she must make high risk emotional shifts in seconds.

Sandra Ruiz and Bernardo Mazon turn in good work as Moises’s wife Belen (“Bethlehem”: the playwright never skimps on the symbolism) and Monica’s cold killer/battle-shocked husband Luis (who at one point brags how he killed children and saved bullets). The supporting cast is uneven, but all create a soundscape of chants, shouts, and screams, plus the rhythms of rituals effectively.

The design work has a kind of choreography. Nate Cargill’s lighting boasts a surprising number of arresting effects for such a small space. And Shaun Tuazon’s set’s like the Cheshire Cat: it’s there, when needed, then gone when not. A wheat-colored maze, the set looks like the humble interior of a cabin or shack. It never intrudes. At the same time, it’s packed with suggestive background details. The most appealing: fluted plastic shower curtains cut on a bias to make them — a touch of magic realism here — resemble chimes.

Playing through December 10

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Tofu House goes to college

At latest chapter of Korean favorite, a robot brings hot stone pots to the table
Next Article

UCSD misses out on Covid and Fema gravy trains

Toni Atkins' love of horses
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories Fishing Report — What’s getting hooked from ship and shore From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close