Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

City slams door on Faulconer-Chargers emails release

"Public interest in nondisclosure clearly outweighs the public interest in disclosure," mayoral denial asserts

San Diego mayor Kevin Faulconer — whose ambitions for higher office are said by critics to have motivated his behind-the-scenes deal with the wealthy Republican Spanos clan to back a new tax-subsidized stadium and meeting complex — won't be releasing any documents that show the contrary — nor any other public records regarding the mayor’s private dealings with Spanos representatives leading to his declaration of support.

That's the word from city hall, where officials in charge of handling public records releases have denied a request to obtain emails and other documentation of the mayor's decision to back Measure C, a hotel tax hike and public subsidy of the $1.8 billion project that the Spanos family has spent more than $5 million to get on the ballot and campaign prior to next week's citywide vote.

The October 3 request, made by the Reader under provisions of the California Public Records Act, asks for "all calendars, appointment sheets, minutes, and related documentation from the office of Kevin Faulconer and office of city attorney regarding meetings by the mayor and his staff both internally and with outside parties," regarding the Spanos-Faulconer deal.

Other documents requested include those regarding negotiations between the parties, as well as "receipts, purchase orders, cancelled checks, agreements with consultants and counsel, and other documentation regarding expenditures by the city of San Diego" leading to the mayor's endorsement.

As previously reported, last week, the city released calendar entries from Faulconer's office revealing a months-long series of closed-door meetings and related communications between Spanos representatives and Faulconer and his staff about the stadium deal, but no minutes, notes, agendas, or other details of the private sessions were released.

"We are still reviewing emails related to this request," said an October 29 email from the city, indicating there was more material to come.

Then, late November 2, the city dispatched another email saying that no further material would be released. "All responsive documents have been released except for portions redacted pursuant to: Government Code section 6255 [the public interest in nondisclosure clearly outweighs the public interest in disclosure]."

As an aspiring candidate for state or federal office, Faulconer has jumped on the open-government bandwagon, announcing a "Transparency First" plan that pledged to eliminate most closed-door dealings.

"An open City Hall is integral to building public trust in government," pronounced the mayor's transition advisory committee in June 2012.

Though an automated public records act system that Faulconer promised has come to fruition, inside observers note that it is often used to frequently deny document requests, forcing those attempting to obtain records to make repeated queries of the online system, often with few productive results.

Jan Goldsmith

If officials choose to stonewall, further relief is only available through costly legal filings leading to lengthy public records cases in superior court. Thus, in the case of the Faulconer and Spanos documents, the mayor, and lame-duck city attorney Jan Goldsmith, will likely be able to keep their big-money Chargers secrets until after the election.

Depending on the ballot results, the hidden public records issue may or may not be mooted, or become part of a legal battle royale over the ballot outcome.

“If the vote is less than two-thirds but more than 50%, it’s conceivable Spanos and San Diego city leaders would take that as a signal to keep trying for a solution,” notes USA Today’s Brent Schrotenboer.

“But it’s unclear where the money would come from for any other stadium plan in San Diego if voters reject public funding for this one…. Fortunately for Spanos, the Raiders currently are targeting a new stadium in Las Vegas, possibly giving some more time for Spanos to sort things out in San Diego, including possible legal issues.”

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Bitcoin Exchange Script To Start Bitcoin Exchange Website
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 25, 2020
GYROSCOPE EXTREME Business Opportunity $9000
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 23, 2020
WALKING DOG IN MIRA MESA
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 24, 2020
UCSD ALZHEIMER’S STUDY
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 24, 2020
Home Care Assistance - Caregivers Needed
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 30, 2020
Ad
Previous article

Que Huong Vietnamese restaurant serves quail, wild boar, deer, and more

Trying something new while stuck at home
Next Article

Lou Curtiss tells his own story

Yale Strom and Elizabeth Schwartz work to complete documentary on the Folk Arts maven
Comments
11

The new California Legislature in 2017 needs to strengthen CPRA to stop governmental agencies from refusing to comply with legitimate requests for public information. Furthermore, heavy fines should be added to discourage public officials from flaunting the law. Are you listening, Todd Gloria and Toni Atkins?--How about some leadership on this issue?

Nov. 3, 2016

Vote NO on C for the COLLUSION and secrecy between Chargers and the Mayor. Demand a full accounting and transparency regarding any and all meeting on the matter.

Nov. 3, 2016

It goes without saying that CPRA should be renamed CRAP.

This is yet another method that Politicians can use for CYA.

Too bad we can't vote Hell No on C

Nov. 3, 2016

Outrageous. This is an outrageous abuse of office.

Nov. 3, 2016

Had to check to see if this wasn't a SD on The QT story. The pubic interest in non-disclosure out weighs the public interest in disclosure? Who makes this illogical nonsense up?

Nov. 4, 2016

"pubic" interest?

Nov. 5, 2016

Spell check's a hoot ain't it?

Nov. 5, 2016

When Bob Filner was mayor, I guess there was some "pubic" interest from him that he couldn't control.

Nov. 6, 2016

Oh, Bahnee, are you tuned in? Does this sound like public corruption? It should. Will Bahnee investigate? LOL

Nov. 4, 2016

Maybe a costly legal filing by the Reader would lead to relief and a landmark decision in favor of FOIA by the court. That might be a better use of income accruing from all those green pages at the back of the journal than some other lost causes that management pursues.

Nov. 6, 2016

This was not an FOIA request; that is for federal government agencies. This was California's version, called the California Public Records Act.

Nov. 6, 2016

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Kevin Faulconer and Dean Spanos
Kevin Faulconer and Dean Spanos

San Diego mayor Kevin Faulconer — whose ambitions for higher office are said by critics to have motivated his behind-the-scenes deal with the wealthy Republican Spanos clan to back a new tax-subsidized stadium and meeting complex — won't be releasing any documents that show the contrary — nor any other public records regarding the mayor’s private dealings with Spanos representatives leading to his declaration of support.

That's the word from city hall, where officials in charge of handling public records releases have denied a request to obtain emails and other documentation of the mayor's decision to back Measure C, a hotel tax hike and public subsidy of the $1.8 billion project that the Spanos family has spent more than $5 million to get on the ballot and campaign prior to next week's citywide vote.

The October 3 request, made by the Reader under provisions of the California Public Records Act, asks for "all calendars, appointment sheets, minutes, and related documentation from the office of Kevin Faulconer and office of city attorney regarding meetings by the mayor and his staff both internally and with outside parties," regarding the Spanos-Faulconer deal.

Other documents requested include those regarding negotiations between the parties, as well as "receipts, purchase orders, cancelled checks, agreements with consultants and counsel, and other documentation regarding expenditures by the city of San Diego" leading to the mayor's endorsement.

As previously reported, last week, the city released calendar entries from Faulconer's office revealing a months-long series of closed-door meetings and related communications between Spanos representatives and Faulconer and his staff about the stadium deal, but no minutes, notes, agendas, or other details of the private sessions were released.

"We are still reviewing emails related to this request," said an October 29 email from the city, indicating there was more material to come.

Then, late November 2, the city dispatched another email saying that no further material would be released. "All responsive documents have been released except for portions redacted pursuant to: Government Code section 6255 [the public interest in nondisclosure clearly outweighs the public interest in disclosure]."

As an aspiring candidate for state or federal office, Faulconer has jumped on the open-government bandwagon, announcing a "Transparency First" plan that pledged to eliminate most closed-door dealings.

"An open City Hall is integral to building public trust in government," pronounced the mayor's transition advisory committee in June 2012.

Though an automated public records act system that Faulconer promised has come to fruition, inside observers note that it is often used to frequently deny document requests, forcing those attempting to obtain records to make repeated queries of the online system, often with few productive results.

Jan Goldsmith

If officials choose to stonewall, further relief is only available through costly legal filings leading to lengthy public records cases in superior court. Thus, in the case of the Faulconer and Spanos documents, the mayor, and lame-duck city attorney Jan Goldsmith, will likely be able to keep their big-money Chargers secrets until after the election.

Depending on the ballot results, the hidden public records issue may or may not be mooted, or become part of a legal battle royale over the ballot outcome.

“If the vote is less than two-thirds but more than 50%, it’s conceivable Spanos and San Diego city leaders would take that as a signal to keep trying for a solution,” notes USA Today’s Brent Schrotenboer.

“But it’s unclear where the money would come from for any other stadium plan in San Diego if voters reject public funding for this one…. Fortunately for Spanos, the Raiders currently are targeting a new stadium in Las Vegas, possibly giving some more time for Spanos to sort things out in San Diego, including possible legal issues.”

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
ANTIQUE GAS STOVE
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 24, 2020
Cash for Walt Disney autographs,
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 24, 2020
Suzuki Musique Alto Saxophone - $275 at Ramona
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 26, 2020
2- Peavey 2000 watt RMS, 4000 watt peak Sp-4 3 way Pa Speakers - $600
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 26, 2020
CLIPLESS PEDALS
San Diego Reader Classified ads
March 24, 2020
Previous article

Six tanka by Andrew Hamlin

Throw open the window in winter
Next Article

Lou Curtiss tells his own story

Yale Strom and Elizabeth Schwartz work to complete documentary on the Folk Arts maven
Comments
11

The new California Legislature in 2017 needs to strengthen CPRA to stop governmental agencies from refusing to comply with legitimate requests for public information. Furthermore, heavy fines should be added to discourage public officials from flaunting the law. Are you listening, Todd Gloria and Toni Atkins?--How about some leadership on this issue?

Nov. 3, 2016

Vote NO on C for the COLLUSION and secrecy between Chargers and the Mayor. Demand a full accounting and transparency regarding any and all meeting on the matter.

Nov. 3, 2016

It goes without saying that CPRA should be renamed CRAP.

This is yet another method that Politicians can use for CYA.

Too bad we can't vote Hell No on C

Nov. 3, 2016

Outrageous. This is an outrageous abuse of office.

Nov. 3, 2016

Had to check to see if this wasn't a SD on The QT story. The pubic interest in non-disclosure out weighs the public interest in disclosure? Who makes this illogical nonsense up?

Nov. 4, 2016

"pubic" interest?

Nov. 5, 2016

Spell check's a hoot ain't it?

Nov. 5, 2016

When Bob Filner was mayor, I guess there was some "pubic" interest from him that he couldn't control.

Nov. 6, 2016

Oh, Bahnee, are you tuned in? Does this sound like public corruption? It should. Will Bahnee investigate? LOL

Nov. 4, 2016

Maybe a costly legal filing by the Reader would lead to relief and a landmark decision in favor of FOIA by the court. That might be a better use of income accruing from all those green pages at the back of the journal than some other lost causes that management pursues.

Nov. 6, 2016

This was not an FOIA request; that is for federal government agencies. This was California's version, called the California Public Records Act.

Nov. 6, 2016

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close