The empty building has become a graffiti magnet.
  • The empty building has become a graffiti magnet.
  • Letter to Editor
  • Pin it

The Wienerschnitzel outlet at 101 W. Washington Street has vacated its yellow A-frame home. The tiny 385-square-foot building is boarded up, tagged with graffiti, and has no “for lease” or “for sale” signs on the property.

The “world's largest hot dog chain,” is owned by Galardi Group, Inc., headquartered in Irvine. Galardi Group franchise area director Rob Long said that the “location closed permanently as new property owner wants a change. Franchisee was month-to-month.”

Meanwhile, the building has been tagged with graffiti. The City of San Diego's “abatement of abandoned properties” ordinance requires that property owners must remove graffiti, post a “no trespassing sign” and post contact information.

In a statement, District 3 councilmember Todd Gloria said: “My office promptly requested staff open up a case at this location on 5/17/16, and will continue to work with staff to ensure the property is not a blight to the neighborhood.”

Leo Wilson, chair of Uptown Planners, spoke of possible plans for the site: “There is someone looking at placing a gourmet coffee shop at that location. It would have a drive-through but also a large outside seating area. Not sure they are moving forward; suggested they make an informational presentation at Uptown Planners to see how the community feels about it.”

According to San Diego County assessor records checked on May 23, the property is owned by “P M Klauber & D J Trust 1” of Long Beach and a few other entities; the assessor records didn't indicate a recent sale of the property.

Philip M. Klauber, who died in 2012, was a longtime San Diego civic leader, high-level SDG&E executive, and a major philanthropist. Klauber was cofounder of the San Diego Foundation and the first president of its board of governors.

  • Letter to Editor
  • Pin it

Comments

SanCarlosGuy2001 May 26, 2016 @ 4:01 p.m.

The old place was a dog. Perhaps, the new owners will ketchup with the times and offer something the neighborhood will relish.

0

dwbat May 26, 2016 @ 5:01 p.m.

Hahaha. Yes, I guess some hot java would help when the weather turns "chili" later in the year!

0

GaryAllmon May 26, 2016 @ 4:44 p.m.

Apparently you didn't digest the article thoroughly. Looks to me, through an unfiltered lens, that someone finally woke up and smelled the ... Others appear to be brewing a solution.

0

dwbat May 26, 2016 @ 5:04 p.m.

You might say they're using their ol' bean with that plan.

0

dwbat May 26, 2016 @ 5:24 p.m.

Maybe it could work. I found this photo of A-Frame Espresso in Fort Bragg, CA.

None

0

Scott Marks May 26, 2016 @ 5:39 p.m.

Who wants to eat in a place whose name sounds like a rank of the Nazi party? I dined there once; they called it a Chicago Stadium Dog. It took a month to pick the splinters out of my tongue. The roller dogs at 7-11 taste better than this chazerai.

0

AlexClarke May 26, 2016 @ 6:06 p.m.

Back in the day when der W started out they served a good hot dog. I ate at one a few years ago and it was awful. Costco serves a good dog.

0

dwbat May 27, 2016 @ 11:40 a.m.

Wienerschnitzel was on "Undercover Boss" recently. The CEO said they were expanding the number of stores (mostly franchises); go figure. Who is eating all those hot dogs?

0

dwbat May 27, 2016 @ 11:57 a.m.

Next time you're in LA, try Pink's. http://www.pinkshollywood.com/ Be prepared to wait in line.

None

0

Visduh May 26, 2016 @ 8 p.m.

Those A-frames are useless for any other application. We had a Wienerschnitzel here in Vista, at a major intersection, until about three years ago, when it folded. (It wasn't the A-frame design.) Soon another of those 'Berto's taco joints moved in, and continues in operation. Last I looked there is still one on Coast Hwy in Oceanside. Sometime along the line, they dropped "Der" from the name.

That one on Washington was a place I hit a few times. Down in SD, and outside my home turf, I found myself hungry and looking for something fast. A dog from that stand was just what I needed: cheap, fast and quick to consume. But I can't say I'll miss it.

Back in the 60's a Der Wienerschnitzel opened on Wilshire Blvd in either West LA, or just over the line in Santa Monica. I suppose it wasn't doing so well, and soon it changed its name to Kosher Coney. Same A-frame, same paint job, same menu except that in a gesture to the 'hood at that time, it had kosher dogs. That was a looong time ago.

0

dwbat May 27, 2016 @ 9:49 a.m.

Let's hope that SOHO doesn't start a campaign to save this rotten A-frame as a "historic" structure.

0

dwbat May 27, 2016 @ 11:53 a.m.

I just saw that the original store in Wilmington IS now a historic landmark.

0

dwbat May 26, 2016 @ 10:41 p.m.

Oh man, that was hilarious. Two wieners up!

0

Ponzi May 28, 2016 @ 2:11 p.m.

I found that Wienerschnitzel on biz-buy-sell about a year ago. They were asking $85,000 for it. I thought that was pretty cheap. The problem with the location is it's a tight corner, does not have a drive-thru and parking is difficult to find. Plus there are so many eateries close by that offer more interesting and healthier food.

The $1.50 dog and soda at Costco still rules.

0

dwbat May 28, 2016 @ 4:07 p.m.

Yes, across the street is the Mediterranean Cafe, which I like a lot.

0

CaptainObvious May 28, 2016 @ 5:58 p.m.

I used to think taggers were vandals, but they are following a cultural imperative. Mexicans have been scrawling incomprehensible jibberish on walls for thousands of years.

0

Ponzi May 28, 2016 @ 10 p.m.

You're actually pretty accurate. But they didn't have spray-cans back then. But they did have dyes and blood. Aside from Egyptian ruins, Teotihuacan is suspected to be older and features thousands of fresco's. The Mestizo have utilized 'graphic arts' for thousands of years. On another thought, I wonder why we even sell spray paint? I'm a pretty handy person and I hardly ever have use for aerosol paint. Who uses spray paint besides model builders?

0

dwbat May 29, 2016 @ 8:46 a.m.

Archeologists do not equate ancient petroglyphs and pictographs with today's ugly "tagging" (which is done by mostly undereducated, nihilistic self-promoters with generally poor artistic skills). P.S. Those ancient drawings are NOT frescoes (which is painting on wet plaster). For example, Michelangelo created frescoes; cave-painters did not.

0

Ponzi May 29, 2016 @ 11:58 a.m.

Teotihuacan murals were made using the fresco technique, using a plaster medium. Teotihuacan art was painted 1,000 years before Michelangelo.

0

dwbat May 29, 2016 @ 1:06 p.m.

I stand corrected, Ponzi. But I was talking about the petroglyphs in caves and on rock formations, rather than polished murals (which are quite different) on the Tepantitla compound walls.

0

dwbat May 28, 2016 @ 6:45 p.m.

Nonsense! Taggers for the most part ARE vandals. They cause property damage, and run down neighborhoods if they are not stopped. $Millions are spent removing their graffiti, and this costs the taxpayers. A tiny minority of the taggers develop artistic talent, and later become muralists. Chicano Park and North Park have very cool murals. But tagging is done by punks, losers, drug addicts, gang bangers, ne'er-do-wells and idiots.

0

dwbat May 30, 2016 @ 11:14 a.m.

Example of very old petroglyphs (location unknown). It's a lot more interesting and artistic than the taggers' ugly scribbling done these days.

None

0

Ponzi May 30, 2016 @ 6:56 p.m.

That's Newspaper Rock in Canyonlands National Park (Utah).

0

dwbat May 30, 2016 @ 7:03 p.m.

Thanks. I could see that image being popular in the fashion world. Do you know the significance of the big feet?

0

Ponzi May 30, 2016 @ 9:34 p.m.

I studied anthropology and worked at some sites many years ago, including Teotihuacan. I don't know if any scientists can confirm what the feet images symbolize. In some cases they point to a landmark. We used to laugh and wonder if some of these drawing were done under the influence of peyote or something. Now the wheel image is interesting because no wheel was introduced in the America's until the Europeans arrived. The natives should have patented it. lol

The symbols were understood to be indications of good hunting grounds. So the prey that was found to be abundant in an area would be depicted on the drawings. Usually buffalo and antelope. Notice the perspective of the buffalo in the drawing look like they are hides, rather than standing beasts. That's because buffalo were prized more for their use as fur and ceremonial purposes than meat, which often times was left to be consumed by wolves.

0

dwbat May 31, 2016 @ 9 a.m.

Interesting information. I think that it could definitely be Peyote (or psilocybin mushrooms) involved there. Artists and seekers historically have altered their consciousness, in varying ways. Freud's choice was cocaine. Poe's was alcohol. Stephen King used a variety of substances. Kurt Cobain's "juice" was heroin. Dickens liked his opium. And van Gogh abused absinthe.

0

Ponzi May 31, 2016 @ 12:26 p.m.

Outstanding analysis. I ever connected all those dots.

0

dwbat May 31, 2016 @ 1:53 p.m.

I "connected a few dots" myself, back in the psychedelic days, ingesting weed and LSD frequently. ;-) [Now my drug of choice is Crestor.]

0

dwbat June 29, 2016 @ 2:57 p.m.

June 29 update: More graffiti has been added, and the City posted a late May Notice of Abatement (which apparently the owner is ignoring).

None

None

0

Sign in to comment

Let’s Be Friends

Subscribe for local event alerts, concerts tickets, promotions and more from the San Diego Reader

Close