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Former University of San Diego women's basketball star Dominique Conners was sentenced today (May 23) to 90 days' house arrest and three years of probation for thefts she committed at Camp Pendleton to feed her gambling addiction.

Dominique Conners

Dominique Conners

She was also ordered to pay $11,779 in restitution for stealing the wedding gifts of a newly married couple staying at the Del Mar Beach Resort at Pendleton.

Conners was a star at USD and is a draft prospect in the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA). She played professional basketball in the Czech Republic. The thievery started after she returned to the United States, According to court documents, she was gambling several thousand dollars a week. She had access to Pendleton because her father is a retired Marine.

Brandon Johnson

Brandon Johnson

In 2013, Brandon Johnson, a former USD basketball star, was sentenced to six months in prison for his role in a game-fixing scam. He was the university's all-time scoring and assists leader. He claimed he never manipulated a game in which he played, although prosecutors said he sought to influence the outcome of games during his senior year.

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Comments

AlexClarke May 24, 2016 @ 6:12 a.m.

I thought basket ball players were supposed to set a good example and be someone for youngsters to look up to. Oh well, another myth shot in the butt.

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Visduh May 24, 2016 @ 8:16 a.m.

Alex, baseball was once on a pedestal that was so high it was hard to see the top. Poorly paid (by today's standards, of course) players were regarded as demigods. Then Pete Rose came along. He played rough, and that sold well, but he also bet on games, including his own games. Baseball has never recovered from that scandal, and I doubt that those in MLB really care. The money keeps coming.

Sportsmanship is a dying concept.

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AlexClarke May 24, 2016 @ 11:58 a.m.

Sad but true. Of course playing rough is now the new norm in politics.

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Don Bauder May 24, 2016 @ 12:13 p.m.

AlexClarke: I am not sure playing rough is a NEW norm in politics.

Grover Cleveland (late 19th century) had impregnated a lass. When he was running (I believe for the second time), his opponents sang this song: "Maw, maw, where's my paw? Gone to the White House haw! haw! haw!"

"Turn the rascals out!" was some challenger's theme. I've forgotten what year or office that was. Best, Don Bauder

There are many others.

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Don Bauder May 24, 2016 @ 12:05 p.m.

Visduh: Good point. Remember this: the players are part of the corporate welfare/billionaire stadium scam. With the public paying for stadiums, players an be paid outrageous sums. The owners are billionaires and the players are millionaires -- often multi-millionaires. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder May 24, 2016 @ 11:59 a.m.

AlexClarke: Behavior aside, people have to look up to basketball players. It seems to me that the average height in professional basketball is 6 foot-6, maybe even taller. Players with large universities must average at least 6-foot-5. Best, Don Bauder

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shirleyberan May 24, 2016 @ 10:08 a.m.

And Tom Brady can't handle a four game suspension for cheating in a Super Bowl. What a pussy.

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Don Bauder May 24, 2016 @ 12:16 p.m.

shirleyberan: It wasn't a Super Bowl that led to Deflategate, I believe. I think it was a playoff game, however. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder May 24, 2016 @ 12:30 p.m.

Mike Murphy: Of course it is all about money. And owners of pro teams, particularly football teams, rake in enormous sums. That's why the NFL keeps the books hidden. Best, Don Bauder

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MURPHYJUNK May 24, 2016 @ 2:08 p.m.

maybe the fans will realize this ( or admit it to themselves)

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Don Bauder May 26, 2016 @ 5:57 a.m.

Murphyjunk: Sports fans don't admit anything. The word "fan" is a shortening of "fanatic." That's key to the billionaire sports welfare scam. Billionaire owners know that there are lots of fans for whom the team is their only life. They will turn out for elections en masse. Best, Don Bauder

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MURPHYJUNK May 26, 2016 @ 7:41 a.m.

old story has if when hearing something outrageous, say fantastic, its more polite than saying bullshit.

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Don Bauder May 26, 2016 @ 4:28 p.m.

Murphyjunk: It may be an "old story" but I have never heard it before. I loved it. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder May 24, 2016 @ 12:48 p.m.

Brooke Jeiniker Sorry. I disagree. The scandals of the recent past -- particularly involving gambling -- should be a smudge on USD for years to come, although I would say that Brandon Johnson's gambling will probably hurt USD more. The only way to curb game-throwing and point-shaving among athletes is to slap stiff penalties on such activities.

We don't know if she gambled on USD games while playing, but investigators (including media) should look into it, even if the statute of limitations has run out. Best, Don Bauder

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MichaelValentine May 24, 2016 @ 2:20 p.m.

Does anyone with a gambling addiction ever win in the long run?

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Don Bauder May 25, 2016 @ 3:44 a.m.

MichaelValentine: If you frequent a casino, in the long run you will lose -- perhaps everything. That's true of horse races, too. Insiders can make money in casinos (and then illegally skim off some more), but that's because the insiders are tipped off on the results. Ditto horse races. The only people that aren't losers are insiders. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder May 25, 2016 @ 2:01 p.m.

Murphyjunk: Decades ago, when I was with the San Diego Union-Tribune, I suggested that newspapers should run the race results right next to the stock listings. They attracted the same readers.

Earlier, when I was with Business Week, I did not have access to the Dow Jones wire in my office. So I would go down to the Merrill Lynch office several times a day to check the wire. There was a phone in the room. One day a sign appeared: "People are using this phone to call competitors. If this doesn't stop, we will remove the phone." I used to hear those conversations. The competitors were bookies.

Incidentally, the wire was in a room for the "sitters ands spitters," the name for the old codgers who sat there all day long and placed bets on stocks and on horses.Best, Don Bauder

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chucka95 May 25, 2016 @ 2:16 p.m.

She went to USD four years ago and there have been zero allegations of gambling during her playing days. So exactly how is this "Another Basketball Scandal Hits USD?"

Should the headline regarding the national anthem problems at the Padres game read "Scandal Hits Mesa College" because the Padres DJ attended school there a few years ago?

Clickbait at its worst...

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Don Bauder May 26, 2016 @ 6:06 a.m.

chucka95: I suppose you would argue that the media should cover the Phil Mickelson scandal without mentioning professional golf. I see your point but disagree. An athlete with a gambling problem is a story that should lead the sports section, even if he/she has not been charged with gambling on games. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder May 27, 2016 @ 6:39 a.m.

David Michael Parada: In its news release, the U.S. Attorney's office said she "had access to Camp Pendleton because her father is a retired Marine." Best, Don Bauder

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Flapper May 27, 2016 @ 8:25 a.m.

Sports used to be for fun--for kids and childlike "adults." "Sportsmanship" was recognizing that, for the moment at least, that the other player(s) did a better job. Now, professionalization of sports has increasingly become prostitution. Eschew such things personally, and, as a true society, we should not "support" that. If we continue to support and faulty concept, we deserve all the blowback we get. Unfortunately, we are not fully integrated as a society must be, but are fragmented, which is what leads to disintegration. The minority who behave according to social (voluntary) mores, are forced, in a cultural milieu, to suffer from the choices of the majority (or an antisocial minority).

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Don Bauder May 29, 2016 @ 3:32 p.m.

Flapper: But there are protections for the minority. Best, Don Bauder

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