Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Who's ready to hit the urban trail?

“I think we’re going to be the envy of San Diego.”

Altered image depicting proposed changes to 14th Street
Altered image depicting proposed changes to 14th Street

On May 12, the final public workshop was held before plans are finalized to transform 11 blocks in downtown’s East Village into a linear park for pedestrians and cyclists.

The streetscape revamp originated with Civic San Diego, the agency responsible for downtown planning and permitting since the city dissolved its redevelopment arm four years ago.

To accomplish the project’s goals, one sidewalk will be widened, both vehicle lanes will be narrowed, and parking on one side of the street will be eliminated.

14th Street as it exists today

The businesses I surveyed on the “demonstration block” (between G and Market streets) all said they supported the project. I also spoke to other residents and merchants in the area.

Claudine Scott said, “I’m incredibly excited about the renaissance going on in the East Village. I think we’re going to be the envy of San Diego.”

Tod Firotto, owner of San Diego Restaurant Supply at 1202 Market Street, has run his business in the East Village for more than 50 years. He wasn’t as gung-ho about the project.

“This thing as far as I understand it is a unique idea, as long as it doesn’t choke up traffic and cannibalize parking,” said Firotto. “If CivicSD wants to take street parking away, they should be prepared to immediately spend on building public parking structures to compensate for the hardship. All the new commercial and retail space has vacancies for lack of parking. Developers are not forced to provide onsite commercial or retail parking, hence few tenants. Vibrant business and jobs are the result of good access by patrons and auto parking.”

Adrian Granda from councilmember Todd Gloria’s office said on May 16, “We do get complaints about parking pretty often, but commercial and residential developments have parking minimum requirements. Public parking may not be used to meet those requirements. I can’t recall any business or space that is vacant because of [lack of] parking.”

While some parking will be lost to the “urban trail,” there will be more than 200 new spots coming by the end of 2017 in the form of a new parking garage, said Civic San Diego spokesperson Kathleen Brand. The location of the structure will be west of 14th, along G street.

“There is $12.75 million in the FY17 Parking District budget to pay for the design and construction of the garage,” said Brand. “We are currently working with the parking design consultant to refine the design and prepare preliminary cost estimates….

“The master plan has an urban trail for 11 blocks on 14th Street, but we only have funding from SANDAG for one demonstration project on the block between G Street and Market Street,” said Brand.

A $1 million SANDAG grant for the demonstration block is funded by voter-approved TransNet sales tax revenue. Brand said an additional $250,000 will come from the FAR Bonus Fund (a fee developers pay to increase density in their projects).

As far as the other ten blocks, Brand said that funding will likely come from grants and development impact fees over the next decade.

In a March internal CivicSD memo concerning the downtown mobility plan, it is stated that an estimated $62.5 million is needed to implement all recommended pedestrian, bicycle, vehicular, and parking improvements within the plan over the next 30 years. A recommendation within the memo states that any parking spaces lost due to implementation of the mobility plan must be replaced.

“With the widening of the sidewalk, there’ll be more vegetation than any other block downtown,” said Brand. “The other [noteworthy features are] the pedestrian gateways for each of the three districts. There will be an archway element to distinguish each area, bringing in historical elements unique to each area. We will have interactive displays or urban artifacts with some historical significance.”

The three districts referred to will be the “Urban Discovery and Play District” (south of C Street to F Street); the “Park District,” which includes East Village Green with the new Fault Line Park (south of F street to J street); and the Innovation and Entertainment District (Third Avenue to south of J Street).

“The finalized plan goes to the Civic San Diego board and committees in June,” said Brand. Construction on the demonstration block will begin nine months to a year from now with completion planned by the end of 2017.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Mostra Coffee is finally caffeinating 4S Ranch

Local micro roaster of the year replaces a boring chain coffeeshop
Next Article

Oceanside Democrats feud over membership

Club stacking just part of growing pains?
Altered image depicting proposed changes to 14th Street
Altered image depicting proposed changes to 14th Street

On May 12, the final public workshop was held before plans are finalized to transform 11 blocks in downtown’s East Village into a linear park for pedestrians and cyclists.

The streetscape revamp originated with Civic San Diego, the agency responsible for downtown planning and permitting since the city dissolved its redevelopment arm four years ago.

To accomplish the project’s goals, one sidewalk will be widened, both vehicle lanes will be narrowed, and parking on one side of the street will be eliminated.

14th Street as it exists today

The businesses I surveyed on the “demonstration block” (between G and Market streets) all said they supported the project. I also spoke to other residents and merchants in the area.

Claudine Scott said, “I’m incredibly excited about the renaissance going on in the East Village. I think we’re going to be the envy of San Diego.”

Tod Firotto, owner of San Diego Restaurant Supply at 1202 Market Street, has run his business in the East Village for more than 50 years. He wasn’t as gung-ho about the project.

“This thing as far as I understand it is a unique idea, as long as it doesn’t choke up traffic and cannibalize parking,” said Firotto. “If CivicSD wants to take street parking away, they should be prepared to immediately spend on building public parking structures to compensate for the hardship. All the new commercial and retail space has vacancies for lack of parking. Developers are not forced to provide onsite commercial or retail parking, hence few tenants. Vibrant business and jobs are the result of good access by patrons and auto parking.”

Adrian Granda from councilmember Todd Gloria’s office said on May 16, “We do get complaints about parking pretty often, but commercial and residential developments have parking minimum requirements. Public parking may not be used to meet those requirements. I can’t recall any business or space that is vacant because of [lack of] parking.”

While some parking will be lost to the “urban trail,” there will be more than 200 new spots coming by the end of 2017 in the form of a new parking garage, said Civic San Diego spokesperson Kathleen Brand. The location of the structure will be west of 14th, along G street.

“There is $12.75 million in the FY17 Parking District budget to pay for the design and construction of the garage,” said Brand. “We are currently working with the parking design consultant to refine the design and prepare preliminary cost estimates….

“The master plan has an urban trail for 11 blocks on 14th Street, but we only have funding from SANDAG for one demonstration project on the block between G Street and Market Street,” said Brand.

A $1 million SANDAG grant for the demonstration block is funded by voter-approved TransNet sales tax revenue. Brand said an additional $250,000 will come from the FAR Bonus Fund (a fee developers pay to increase density in their projects).

As far as the other ten blocks, Brand said that funding will likely come from grants and development impact fees over the next decade.

In a March internal CivicSD memo concerning the downtown mobility plan, it is stated that an estimated $62.5 million is needed to implement all recommended pedestrian, bicycle, vehicular, and parking improvements within the plan over the next 30 years. A recommendation within the memo states that any parking spaces lost due to implementation of the mobility plan must be replaced.

“With the widening of the sidewalk, there’ll be more vegetation than any other block downtown,” said Brand. “The other [noteworthy features are] the pedestrian gateways for each of the three districts. There will be an archway element to distinguish each area, bringing in historical elements unique to each area. We will have interactive displays or urban artifacts with some historical significance.”

The three districts referred to will be the “Urban Discovery and Play District” (south of C Street to F Street); the “Park District,” which includes East Village Green with the new Fault Line Park (south of F street to J street); and the Innovation and Entertainment District (Third Avenue to south of J Street).

“The finalized plan goes to the Civic San Diego board and committees in June,” said Brand. Construction on the demonstration block will begin nine months to a year from now with completion planned by the end of 2017.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

San Diego's punk music, goodbye to Lennon

Reader writers tell favorite music
Next Article

The unsinkable Linda Broyles

“I mean, when they said I couldn’t go home, I could see Coronado!”
Comments
3

Great news. The City of San Diego has over $76,332,000 Hoarded in Cash Reserve Fund Balances in SANDAG TransNet funding [=$57,827,000 Budgeted + $18,505,000 Unbudgeted] in SANDAG and City Bank Accounts. See Pages 246-250 of the City's FY-2015 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR) for the available $76.3 million in SANDAG TransNet Cash Reserves.

http://tinyurl.com/20150630a

By SANDAG TransNet law the maximum Cash Reserve Fund Balances is 30% of the City of San Diego's annual Revenue from Sales Tax of $28.9 million or $8.67 million maximum in unused Cash Reserves.

SANDAG Board Policy 31 TransNet Ordinance and Expenditure Plan. Rule 17 Fiscal and Compliance Audits. Section IV. Local Agency Balance Limitations. See Page 11.

http://www.sandag.org/uploads/projectid/projectid_341_15158.pdf

Based on annual audits from the Independent Taxpayer Oversight Committee (ITOC), a City that maintains a balance of more than 30 percent of its annual apportionment (after debt service payments) must use the remaining balance to fund projects.

ITOC reports do not make it clear that San Diego is in constant violation of Board Policy 31, Rule 17, Section 4, Local Balance Limitations by Hoarding Cash Reserves in Fund Balances.

In theory, SANDAG will defer payment until the recipient agency’s Director of Finance, or equivalent, submits to SANDAG a certification that the unused balance has fallen below the 30 percent threshold, and will remain below the threshold until such time that a new threshold is determined. However this law has never been enforced.

"IV. Local Agency Balance Limitations Based on the audit, an agency that maintains a balance of more than 30 percent of its annual apportionment (after debt service payments) must use the remaining balance to fund projects. SANDAG will defer payment until the recipient agency’s Director of Finance, or equivalent, submits to SANDAG a certification that the unused balance has fallen below the 30 percent threshold, and will remain below the threshold until such time that a new threshold is determined."

May 20, 2016

It will be a great place, like the park at Horton Plaza, for the homeless druggies and alcoholics to hang out.

May 21, 2016

1) Civic SD has taken Redevelopment Money earmarked for North Park and is spending elsewhere - Why is that?

2) The City goofed when they built the North Park Garage (with Redevelopment money) by not building it to support an urban park on its roof! Hopefully that will not happen again, all parking buildings should provide urban roof parks, unless they are filled with vehicles.

May 26, 2016

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close