Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

San Ysidro’s new library to come in late 2019

After derailment in 2002, councilman Alvarez gets project on track

Community members at San Ysidro Civic Center on April 29th
Community members at San Ysidro Civic Center on April 29th

Frank E. Beyer, a border baron who co-owned the Sunset Inn and Racetrack in Tijuana, lived in San Ysidro during the Prohibition days. He purportedly drank a bottle of whiskey a day and could be seen at the racetrack in a crumpled gray suit. He also donated money for the San Ysidro Public Library. In return, Beyer wanted the library to have a smoking room, replete with a spittoon and a copy of the racy Police Gazette magazine.

The San Ysidro Public Library was completed in 1924 and today is a San Diego historic site. As the oldest public library in the county, it’s also crowded with lines of people waiting to use the computers and access other services.

In 1984 the library was expanded from 1200 to 4089 square feet. The sign in front of the building also changed from English to Spanish in order to better represent the community. Residents, however, criticized the expansion, saying the library still wasn’t big enough to meet the needs of the growing community — which today stands at about 29,000.

By 1996, the San Ysidro School District was willing to donate 766 acres of land along Otay Mesa Road. An architect was selected to begin design work, but in 2002, councilman Ralph Inzunza (who eventually served a 21-month prison sentence after being convicted on federal corruption charges) held an open meeting to announce a change of location. Developer Sam Marasco wanted to build the library inside the Las Americas shopping center, which he owned.

Community members protested, saying that the Otay Mesa site would serve 85 percent of the community due to its location within the heart of San Ysidro; a library in the Las Americas mall would serve only 15 percent of residents. But community voices went unheard. The library was never built.

David Alvarez

On Friday, April 29th, councilman David Alvarez announced to a packed San Ysidro Civic Center that the community would finally get their new library. “My work was to get you the land and the money, and I did that.”

Representatives of the Public Works Department told the audience that by winter 2019 a 15,000-square-foot library should be built at 123 E. Seaward Avenue — a 1.62-acre lot acquired by the city in 2015. The project budget is estimated at $12.8 million, with much of it obtained through bonds and development impact fees. The funding gap has been closed by a private donation of $1.5 million by Lloyd de Llamas, who lived in San Ysidro for much of his life.

Alvarez said, “The day is finally here where the community gets to speak and share their ideas about what they want this library to look like.”

Representatives of four architectural firms — competing to create interior and exterior designs — listened to residents who highlighted the problems associated with the lack of an adequate library. They said they need a teen center, more books for children, technology designed to benefit students now and ten years from now, a space that highlights San Ysidro history, a space that respects the Latino heritage of the majority of residents (including perhaps Mexican tiles or a gazebo for Aztec dancers), a café, large windows, and abundant natural light.

The audience applauded when a community member asked for a roof that could open in an observatory style. Another resident asked for a water fountain with lighting. The assistant deputy director of public works commented, “I will take that input, but I see a lot of maintenance issues with that, so no promises.”

Community members are encouraged to submit additional suggestions by May 15th. Send an email or go to sandiego.gov/newsybl.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Kanye West for president

Will San Diego voters be lining up at the polls?
Community members at San Ysidro Civic Center on April 29th
Community members at San Ysidro Civic Center on April 29th

Frank E. Beyer, a border baron who co-owned the Sunset Inn and Racetrack in Tijuana, lived in San Ysidro during the Prohibition days. He purportedly drank a bottle of whiskey a day and could be seen at the racetrack in a crumpled gray suit. He also donated money for the San Ysidro Public Library. In return, Beyer wanted the library to have a smoking room, replete with a spittoon and a copy of the racy Police Gazette magazine.

The San Ysidro Public Library was completed in 1924 and today is a San Diego historic site. As the oldest public library in the county, it’s also crowded with lines of people waiting to use the computers and access other services.

In 1984 the library was expanded from 1200 to 4089 square feet. The sign in front of the building also changed from English to Spanish in order to better represent the community. Residents, however, criticized the expansion, saying the library still wasn’t big enough to meet the needs of the growing community — which today stands at about 29,000.

By 1996, the San Ysidro School District was willing to donate 766 acres of land along Otay Mesa Road. An architect was selected to begin design work, but in 2002, councilman Ralph Inzunza (who eventually served a 21-month prison sentence after being convicted on federal corruption charges) held an open meeting to announce a change of location. Developer Sam Marasco wanted to build the library inside the Las Americas shopping center, which he owned.

Community members protested, saying that the Otay Mesa site would serve 85 percent of the community due to its location within the heart of San Ysidro; a library in the Las Americas mall would serve only 15 percent of residents. But community voices went unheard. The library was never built.

David Alvarez

On Friday, April 29th, councilman David Alvarez announced to a packed San Ysidro Civic Center that the community would finally get their new library. “My work was to get you the land and the money, and I did that.”

Representatives of the Public Works Department told the audience that by winter 2019 a 15,000-square-foot library should be built at 123 E. Seaward Avenue — a 1.62-acre lot acquired by the city in 2015. The project budget is estimated at $12.8 million, with much of it obtained through bonds and development impact fees. The funding gap has been closed by a private donation of $1.5 million by Lloyd de Llamas, who lived in San Ysidro for much of his life.

Alvarez said, “The day is finally here where the community gets to speak and share their ideas about what they want this library to look like.”

Representatives of four architectural firms — competing to create interior and exterior designs — listened to residents who highlighted the problems associated with the lack of an adequate library. They said they need a teen center, more books for children, technology designed to benefit students now and ten years from now, a space that highlights San Ysidro history, a space that respects the Latino heritage of the majority of residents (including perhaps Mexican tiles or a gazebo for Aztec dancers), a café, large windows, and abundant natural light.

The audience applauded when a community member asked for a roof that could open in an observatory style. Another resident asked for a water fountain with lighting. The assistant deputy director of public works commented, “I will take that input, but I see a lot of maintenance issues with that, so no promises.”

Community members are encouraged to submit additional suggestions by May 15th. Send an email or go to sandiego.gov/newsybl.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Covid-19 casts a pall over San Diego political money

Barbara Bry's daughter lends $5000
Next Article

Vista squeezes pot clinics with 4375 percent fee rise

While Oceanside ponders the storefronts
Comments
3

Will all the books be in Spanish? San Y Skid Row needs a library like Hillcrest needs Baptists.

May 5, 2016

Not so, Alex. The library is a lot more than books these days. Aside from offering an almost unlimited supply of movies (dvds), there is also music cd's, both classic and contemporary, computers, wifi, children's programs, book clubs, and pretty much whatever the community could use. Depending on the facility, there may also be movies, classes, workshops, and meeting space for local groups. The best part is, if the branch does not have what you are looking for they can get it for you by borrowing from the Central or any of the other branches, so you bascially have the entire library system at your disposal. And what's even better is the price: free. You get it all for nothing more than giving them your name and address. The library has become so much more than it was when I was a kid. Sydro will benefit quite a lot from having a new one. Instead of building dumbass football stadiums, San Diegans would benefit so much more from having all the small branches expanded into larger, modern libraries.

May 5, 2016

Well, ok I can't disagree and I absolutely agree with not building a dumb ass stadium.

May 6, 2016

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close