4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Youth and 20/20 vision in Indian Wells

The BNP Paribas Open goes down in Coachella Valley every March.

Taking in the action and desert sun from the Indian Wells grandstand.
Taking in the action and desert sun from the Indian Wells grandstand.

A chance meeting in the desert provided answers on the requirements for becoming an official at a major professional tennis tournament, like the one at Indian Wells.

Just a 2.5-hour drive from San Diego, the BNP Paribas Tennis Open at Indian Wells was a relatively easy jaunt. Driving up one afternoon to catch an evening session of this prestige professional tennis tournament, we stayed the night and watched the following day’s session before heading home that afternoon.

The route we chose was pretty direct, heading north up Route 163 to Interstate 15 North. Then Interstate 215 to Route 60 East, ultimately connecting with Interstate 10 East. If heading directly to the Indian Wells Tennis Garden, you would take Exit 137 on to Washington Street south. The trip is roughly 160 miles, covering over two and a half hours.

Dream job?

An important element of tennis matches is the officiating. I had often wondered about the source of the numerous officials at the various tournaments, seeing the uniformed small squads of men and women working the large competitions. The 2016 BNP Paribas Tennis Open was no exception.

A serendipitous encounter with one of the line judges provided the perfect opportunity to make some inquiries.

The elderly gent attired in the distinctive officiating uniform was very pleasant and open, as we were both taking a break out of the sun. While he sat on some steps leading in to the one of the court venues, I struck up conversation.

“How does one become a line judge?”

In what might have been a slight Italian accent, he told of starting by reaching out to the governing body, in this case the United States Tennis Association. The interested individual contacts the appropriate geographic section, attends some training, takes some tests and then starts officiating at lower, smaller levels.

Over time, he related, the provisional official works his/her way up levels of tournaments. They are regularly evaluated on the accuracy of their calls, the “in” or “out” rulings they make, receiving a rating comparable to the tennis player rating system (3.0, 3.5, 4.0, etc.).

Based on performance, if your ratings are good enough, you can move up.

When asked how long it would take to qualify to officiate at a major tournament such as BNP Paribas Tennis Open, he estimated at least four years. And, he cautioned, you are required to provide certification every two years that your vision is verified as 20/20. (Did he add that point because he detected my bifocals?) As he made this comment, it answered an unasked question, since most of the line judges we had seen at the tournament were, shall we say, “well experienced” and some of the balls are flying at well over 100 MPH.

Perhaps thinking I was considering pursuing becoming a line judge, he smiled and said, “It takes two things. Youth and 20/20 vision.” Continuing, he offered that an individual would want to be younger than 50 to start the process.

Speaking of being an official for over 22 years, there was discernible pride in his eyes and voice. At that point, one of his fellow crewmembers for the upcoming match called out and he quickly departed.

I smiled, thinking of him and the countless others out on the courts that hot afternoon. Working in the background, making their calls, that small army of volunteers. The recruiting poster could read “We want you! If you are young and have 20/20 vision.”

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Fashion blogger Erin Miller: Boho, chic, and edgy

“It is so rewarding to see people recreate one of my portraits”
Next Article

How Otay changed, secret TJ gardens, Mission Valley's future

San Diego State's Paseo project, building a Rancho Santa Fe mansion, downtown high rises never stop
Taking in the action and desert sun from the Indian Wells grandstand.
Taking in the action and desert sun from the Indian Wells grandstand.

A chance meeting in the desert provided answers on the requirements for becoming an official at a major professional tennis tournament, like the one at Indian Wells.

Just a 2.5-hour drive from San Diego, the BNP Paribas Tennis Open at Indian Wells was a relatively easy jaunt. Driving up one afternoon to catch an evening session of this prestige professional tennis tournament, we stayed the night and watched the following day’s session before heading home that afternoon.

The route we chose was pretty direct, heading north up Route 163 to Interstate 15 North. Then Interstate 215 to Route 60 East, ultimately connecting with Interstate 10 East. If heading directly to the Indian Wells Tennis Garden, you would take Exit 137 on to Washington Street south. The trip is roughly 160 miles, covering over two and a half hours.

Dream job?

An important element of tennis matches is the officiating. I had often wondered about the source of the numerous officials at the various tournaments, seeing the uniformed small squads of men and women working the large competitions. The 2016 BNP Paribas Tennis Open was no exception.

A serendipitous encounter with one of the line judges provided the perfect opportunity to make some inquiries.

The elderly gent attired in the distinctive officiating uniform was very pleasant and open, as we were both taking a break out of the sun. While he sat on some steps leading in to the one of the court venues, I struck up conversation.

“How does one become a line judge?”

In what might have been a slight Italian accent, he told of starting by reaching out to the governing body, in this case the United States Tennis Association. The interested individual contacts the appropriate geographic section, attends some training, takes some tests and then starts officiating at lower, smaller levels.

Over time, he related, the provisional official works his/her way up levels of tournaments. They are regularly evaluated on the accuracy of their calls, the “in” or “out” rulings they make, receiving a rating comparable to the tennis player rating system (3.0, 3.5, 4.0, etc.).

Based on performance, if your ratings are good enough, you can move up.

When asked how long it would take to qualify to officiate at a major tournament such as BNP Paribas Tennis Open, he estimated at least four years. And, he cautioned, you are required to provide certification every two years that your vision is verified as 20/20. (Did he add that point because he detected my bifocals?) As he made this comment, it answered an unasked question, since most of the line judges we had seen at the tournament were, shall we say, “well experienced” and some of the balls are flying at well over 100 MPH.

Perhaps thinking I was considering pursuing becoming a line judge, he smiled and said, “It takes two things. Youth and 20/20 vision.” Continuing, he offered that an individual would want to be younger than 50 to start the process.

Speaking of being an official for over 22 years, there was discernible pride in his eyes and voice. At that point, one of his fellow crewmembers for the upcoming match called out and he quickly departed.

I smiled, thinking of him and the countless others out on the courts that hot afternoon. Working in the background, making their calls, that small army of volunteers. The recruiting poster could read “We want you! If you are young and have 20/20 vision.”

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Beating back fear of Tijuana, why I keep thinking about Mexico, a cross-border kidnapping

The normalcy of smuggling across the line, party people re-take TJ, deported but not angry
Next Article

San Diego Reader's Best Of issue

Best place for locals, best day drinking park, local seafood, the Athenaeum, before the Casbah re-opens, Pocket Beach, Horsethief Canyon, a bonsai best, San Diego buses
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close