Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

La Mesa Village still a mess

Streetscape to continue after Oktoberfest

Before the project was started, shop owners expressed the importance of maintaining public accessibility.
Before the project was started, shop owners expressed the importance of maintaining public accessibility.

Construction of the long-term project known in La Mesa as "Streetscape" will continue, including after Oktoberfest.

Regarding Streetscape, according to the city's website, “The objective of the project is to revitalize and beautify the downtown area, to enhance its sense of place, to improve its status as a destination, and to solidify its identity as La Mesa’s city center.”

In April and June of 2009, public-comment workshops on the concept for Streetscape Improvement Project were held by the City of La Mesa. During the April 20, 2009, meeting, over 90 percent of the attendees responded “Important/Very Important” to this question: "How important is it to keep access to all businesses during construction?" Additionally, at the June 29, 2009, meeting, a stated project goal was, "minimizing construction impact to downtown businesses."

According to Greg Humora, director of public works/city engineer, “The city’s goal from day one has been to minimize construction impacts as much as possible. We have done our best to move as quickly as possible, minimize direct impact to properties, and when necessary make changes. The construction phasing was determined following stakeholder input at public workshops held in 2009. Summaries of the workshops are on the [city’s] web page.”

A review of city website information indicates that 19 self-identified merchants (21.6% of the attendees) participated in the April workshop, and 13 self-identified merchants (21.7% of the attendees) in the June workshop.

In a November 26, 2013, report to the mayor and members of the city council from the city manager, approval was sought for proceeding with bidding. The report stated that, "over the past year staff has held some 30 meetings with stakeholders to review the construction phasing and gather input."

The project was approved and construction began on July 7, 2014.

It is now more than six years since those initial public workshops.

On September 3, the Reader carried a piece on the closings of Cosmos Coffee Café’ and O’Dunns’s Fine Art in La Mesa as it related to the Streetscape Improvement Project. From recent comments, other local merchants are less than thrilled with the process or progress.

Frank Dittmer of What-a-Dish on La Mesa Boulevard observed it has been a challenge just keeping doors open, citing the negative impact of “Streetscaping” at the height of the construction, during which there was “no parking and no sidewalks.”

Rick Bucklew of Don Keating's Used Cars, also on La Mesa Boulevard, commented that what was to be a nine-month project is stretching into 18 months. When asked if Streetscape construction will be completed in time for the city's Octoberfest, he expects the streets to be usable.

However, after Octoberfest, construction will continue, as confirmed by Humora, the director of public works. “Yes, after Oktoberfest we will be installing trees, new crosswalks, grinding down the old asphalt street, and placing a new layer of asphalt.”

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

The Tobacconist: Stogie story

His job is to sell pleasure and desire, cigars “hand-rolled tenderly by beautiful women on their thighs.”
Next Article

Kahlee310’s snitch rapper reactions

“He’d literally do anything for the money or fame”
Before the project was started, shop owners expressed the importance of maintaining public accessibility.
Before the project was started, shop owners expressed the importance of maintaining public accessibility.

Construction of the long-term project known in La Mesa as "Streetscape" will continue, including after Oktoberfest.

Regarding Streetscape, according to the city's website, “The objective of the project is to revitalize and beautify the downtown area, to enhance its sense of place, to improve its status as a destination, and to solidify its identity as La Mesa’s city center.”

In April and June of 2009, public-comment workshops on the concept for Streetscape Improvement Project were held by the City of La Mesa. During the April 20, 2009, meeting, over 90 percent of the attendees responded “Important/Very Important” to this question: "How important is it to keep access to all businesses during construction?" Additionally, at the June 29, 2009, meeting, a stated project goal was, "minimizing construction impact to downtown businesses."

According to Greg Humora, director of public works/city engineer, “The city’s goal from day one has been to minimize construction impacts as much as possible. We have done our best to move as quickly as possible, minimize direct impact to properties, and when necessary make changes. The construction phasing was determined following stakeholder input at public workshops held in 2009. Summaries of the workshops are on the [city’s] web page.”

A review of city website information indicates that 19 self-identified merchants (21.6% of the attendees) participated in the April workshop, and 13 self-identified merchants (21.7% of the attendees) in the June workshop.

In a November 26, 2013, report to the mayor and members of the city council from the city manager, approval was sought for proceeding with bidding. The report stated that, "over the past year staff has held some 30 meetings with stakeholders to review the construction phasing and gather input."

The project was approved and construction began on July 7, 2014.

It is now more than six years since those initial public workshops.

On September 3, the Reader carried a piece on the closings of Cosmos Coffee Café’ and O’Dunns’s Fine Art in La Mesa as it related to the Streetscape Improvement Project. From recent comments, other local merchants are less than thrilled with the process or progress.

Frank Dittmer of What-a-Dish on La Mesa Boulevard observed it has been a challenge just keeping doors open, citing the negative impact of “Streetscaping” at the height of the construction, during which there was “no parking and no sidewalks.”

Rick Bucklew of Don Keating's Used Cars, also on La Mesa Boulevard, commented that what was to be a nine-month project is stretching into 18 months. When asked if Streetscape construction will be completed in time for the city's Octoberfest, he expects the streets to be usable.

However, after Octoberfest, construction will continue, as confirmed by Humora, the director of public works. “Yes, after Oktoberfest we will be installing trees, new crosswalks, grinding down the old asphalt street, and placing a new layer of asphalt.”

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Two poems by Julia Wehner

A reminder of how richly good it is to feel, and to live
Next Article

Moved to tears by Dave’s Hot Chicken

Nashville hot chicken ranges from no spice, to hot, to the indemnified “reaper”
Comments
4

Any construction project, like remodeling projects one can take the time estimate and double it and the costs and triple it.

Sept. 29, 2015

Who is going to attend Oktoberfest? Everyone in the area knows what a mess the streets are. The nightmare of the Spring Street traffic lights is enough to keep me away from that area. When I have driven through that slice of hell, I have seen cars driving over the curbs at the corners because the "streetscaping" has these curbs that jut out into the street where one would usually not expect them. They may work for pedestrians, but they will be angering drivers.

Sept. 29, 2015

Ponzi: There is hope that the Trolley Trash will continue to attend.

Sept. 29, 2015

Yes, the "proletariat" will attend... many without paying fare.

Sept. 29, 2015

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close