4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Issa says criminal history should be shielded

His own past raises eyebrows

Darrell Issa
Darrell Issa

On Thursday (September 10) a bill called the Fair Chance Act was introduced in Congress. It would stop federal employers and contractors from inquiring about an applicant's criminal history until the final stages of hiring.

North County Rep. Darrell Issa supports the bill, saying, "When 9 percent or nearly one out of ten Americans have a felony on their record and [about] 25 percent have some other blemish or misdemeanor or some other background, can we not take a chance on a quarter of our population? Can we not take a chance on almost 10 percent of our population? We have to take a chance, and the federal government will now be in a position to weigh those chances after they figure out whether or not somebody has earned the qualification to get to that interview."

The bill appears to have bipartisan support.

Sponsored
Sponsored

The publication MediaMatters.org says network and cable interviewers, along with print reporters, generally don't ask Issa about his past. (The New Yorker went over his past in a comprehensive article January 24, 2011.)

Here are some of Issa's brushes with the law, according to MediaMatters.org: In 1982, he was suspected but not charged in an arson incident. An executive charged that Issa used a gun to intimidate the executive, who was being fired.

According to the San Francisco Chronicle, Issa was twice arrested in 1972 on weapons charges. Also according to the Chronicle, Issa was convicted of possession of an unregistered handgun.

According to the New York Times, Issa was arrested in 1972 for auto theft. That year, he was charged with carrying a concealed weapon, according to the Chronicle. The auto theft and concealed weapons charges were dropped.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

The wildest things on the Funky Fries & Burgers menu

Freak shakes are what might result if an ice cream truck crashed into a candy store
Next Article

San Diegans who stay on the I-5

Stories Tim Brookes wrote for the Reader
Darrell Issa
Darrell Issa

On Thursday (September 10) a bill called the Fair Chance Act was introduced in Congress. It would stop federal employers and contractors from inquiring about an applicant's criminal history until the final stages of hiring.

North County Rep. Darrell Issa supports the bill, saying, "When 9 percent or nearly one out of ten Americans have a felony on their record and [about] 25 percent have some other blemish or misdemeanor or some other background, can we not take a chance on a quarter of our population? Can we not take a chance on almost 10 percent of our population? We have to take a chance, and the federal government will now be in a position to weigh those chances after they figure out whether or not somebody has earned the qualification to get to that interview."

The bill appears to have bipartisan support.

Sponsored
Sponsored

The publication MediaMatters.org says network and cable interviewers, along with print reporters, generally don't ask Issa about his past. (The New Yorker went over his past in a comprehensive article January 24, 2011.)

Here are some of Issa's brushes with the law, according to MediaMatters.org: In 1982, he was suspected but not charged in an arson incident. An executive charged that Issa used a gun to intimidate the executive, who was being fired.

According to the San Francisco Chronicle, Issa was twice arrested in 1972 on weapons charges. Also according to the Chronicle, Issa was convicted of possession of an unregistered handgun.

According to the New York Times, Issa was arrested in 1972 for auto theft. That year, he was charged with carrying a concealed weapon, according to the Chronicle. The auto theft and concealed weapons charges were dropped.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

San Diegans who stay on the I-5

Stories Tim Brookes wrote for the Reader
Next Article

The wildest things on the Funky Fries & Burgers menu

Freak shakes are what might result if an ice cream truck crashed into a candy store
Comments
62

Why wait "until the final stages..." That sounds like a waste of time. The federal government usually does not hire anyone with a felony conviction. So why take the interview process through all the hoops just to say, whoa... you cannot be a federal employee. Take the fingerprints first or change the law to allow a felon to get a federal job, after they have paid their dues; done their time, probation and fines have been paid... and after 7 to 10 years like the feds require private enterprise to do.

Sept. 13, 2015

Ponzi: Wise solution. It would be better to pass a law saying that felons could be hired by the government and its contractors under certain stringent conditions. There are so many people that have spent time in prison for drug offenses that there are plenty of people out there that could be useful in a government job. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 13, 2015

Wow, Issa was arrested for auto theft? No wonder he got the idea to start an auto alarm company.

There is a crime behind every fortune.

Sept. 13, 2015

Ponzi: Some French philosopher said that behind every major enterprise is a crime, but I can't remember the philosopher's name. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 13, 2015

It's credited to Honoré de Balzac. But that may not be the original source.

Sept. 8, 2018

I am sure that the bill has bipartisan support as politicians are the biggest crooks of all.

Sept. 13, 2015

AlexClarke: Yes, politicians take in money under the table, but seldom get caught. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 13, 2015

and they own the table

Sept. 13, 2015

Murphyjunk: True. But nothing gets done about it. The Supreme Court opens the door wide to even more corruption through the Citizens United decision -- probably the worst court decision in our history -- and while there are efforts to get a law passed that would knock that decision down, it will probably go nowhere. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 13, 2015

They only seem to get caught if they do something amazingly obvious - like writing menus for quid-pro-quo of bribes on a napkin (Cunningham) or leaving huge sums of cash in a refrigerator (Jefferson).

In addition many forms of bribery and corruption which should obviously be illegal - like making a fortune based on investments based on insider knowledge or paying friends and family members huge sums for serving on campaign and "charities" - are somehow allowed.

Sept. 13, 2015

ImJustABill: The more remunerative the scam, the less chance that the law will step in. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 13, 2015

I wonder what Trump would say about this ( or do if he gets to be the "boss" )

Sept. 14, 2015

Murphyjunk: Although this is a bipartisan effort, my guess is that Trump would veto it if it passed....UNLESS Trump himself committed some crime in his youth, thus giving him empathy with others so marked. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 14, 2015

My incredulity is in his claim that about one in every eleven adults in the US has a felony conviction on his/her record. Without looking any farther, I'm going to say that is nonsense. My take is that if you moved the decimal point one place, it would be closer to the truth. Sheesh, just think about your circle of friends, family, and acquaintances, and count how many have a serious crime rap. Darned few, or none at all, right?

While it is true that young black males have high rates of "brushes" with the law, and many are jailed for periods of time, it doesn't mean that all of those are felonies. Very often they are handled as misdemeanors, and some of those are later expunged.

While the intent of the law is to allow those with a crime record to avoid having it be a drag on the rest of their lives, I don't think this is the way to do that. And I'm really wondering about Issa, who happens to be "my" congressman, and his grasp of facts and reality.

Sept. 13, 2015

Visduh: There must be data on that. In low-income areas, the percentage would probably be more than 10. In high-income areas, it would be lower (even though it would not be if government cracked down on financial scams). So 10 percent is possible. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 13, 2015

I'm sure that there is plenty of such data. If you're talking about arrests and misdemeanor convictions and felonies combined, it is likely 1 in 4 or higher in males. But bring in the distaff, and that percentage goes down. If there were that many felony convictions, it would require a veritable army of prosecutors and judges and courtrooms to have handled them all. No, the felony figure has to be wildly inflated.

Sept. 13, 2015

Visduh: As a judge would say, we have a controversy here. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 13, 2015

Most convicts dont have to be asked. If you have tattoos on your face, neck, or hands, I will not be doing business with you or your employer.

Sept. 13, 2015

CaptainObvious: That may apply today. But tomorrow? Look at all the young people these days with tattoos. As they mature and move into the workforce, this rule of thumb will have to go out the window. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 13, 2015

I get the feeling that some tattoo ink has a negative effect on some persons brains, usually when we see a criminal they are covered in tattoos

Sept. 17, 2015

One of my first jobs was working for a company that turned out to be a Ponzi scheme. The owner liked me and we were on good terms until the FBI raided the offices and took him off to jail. Later I met a woman who served time for her part in a Ponzi scheme. I also have an old friend who was imprisoned for mail fraud selling “how to make money books”. Another friend who served time at Taft for an investment fraud (he was an engineer and was never was involved in investments before). I had two roommates years ago, one that went to prison for smuggling and the other was charged with a felony for insurance fraud. These were not close friends, but well regarded acquaintances. Go to any A.A. meeting and a good percentage will have felony and misdemeanor records.

Like Don commented, most people get felonies for drug related crimes. Others make mistakes, usually when they are young, but find it difficult to rejoin a society that shuns them for a felony. I have another friend who was a real estate agent for over 20 years. He signed some papers he should have paid more attention to and was later charged with obstruction of justice and lost his real estate license. California in particular is very punitive on professional licensees (or applicants) with felonies or a couple of misdemeanors. You cannot get a real estate license if you have had two DUI’s in your life. An electrician, barber, dry wall hanger might not be granted a license if they have an old felony.

Our society used to forgive and consider a person “rehabilitated” if they served their time, paid their fines and stayed out of trouble. These days, with computerized databases and companies that use fear tactics to sell background check data to employers makes it even harder for a person with a trouble past to move on to an respectable future. Data should drop off all criminal databases after some point in time, although there are exceptions like violent crimes; sex offenders, murderers and where there was serious harm to victims. Even bankruptcy falls off credit reports, but not public records (like PACER).

Sept. 13, 2015

Ponzi: Yours is a most persuasive argument. A lot of people get in trouble in their youths. This should not be a target on their backs in their later years. However, in some cases it should be, because it is an indicator of a disturbed personality. It's a tough call. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 13, 2015

The Devil's always in the details. As Racehorse Haines once said, "Sometimes the defense attorney's job is to convince the jury that the victim needed killin'." Sometimes a convicted murderer might have been given a medal instead--if there was such a thing as "justice."

The main thing "we" need to do is to keep in mind that every single cultural invention is deeply flawed, especially when it is highly praised.

Sept. 13, 2015

Twister: I don't know who Racehorse Haines is. But his statement is a perceptive one. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 13, 2015

Racehorse Haines was a famous Texas defense attorney, known for getting murderers off.

Sept. 14, 2015

Twister: I should have known that a guy with the first name Racehorse was from Texas. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 15, 2015

If someone's a threat to society, they should be behind bars. If they're deemed to be "rehabilitated", "no longer a threat", "paid their debt to society"; then they should be FULLY reintegrated with society... able to take any job, vote, buy a gun, whatever. And if they keep committing crimes, they should be locked up for life with no parole.

I don't know what's so terrible about this idea. But an awful lof of people seem to love creating and perpetuating criminals, then letting dangerous predators out. Why? To justify more government, higher taxes, more unions and pensions, most probably.

Sept. 13, 2015

jnojr: There is no doubt that our criminal system creates more criminals -- that is, manufactures recidivism. A young man goes to prison on a drug charge. He gets out, and can't get a job because of his record. To survive, he turns to crime again -- using knowledge that he gained while in prison.

The companies in the private sector that manage prisons lobby for laws that maximize the number of persons incarcerated. That is reprehensible. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 13, 2015

No function of government should be placed in private hands. It a function should be in private hands, it needn't be a government function in the first place.

Sept. 13, 2015

Twister: I think some functions of government can be placed in private hands, but one function that should NOT be privatized is running prisons. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 13, 2015

Outsourcing is just another way of laundering or funneling taxpayer money to your cronies.

Sept. 14, 2015

CORRECTION: IF (not "It") a function should . . .

Sept. 19, 2015

An An excellent report on the checkered past of car-alarm king and GOP Congressman Darryl Issa and such interesting comments! (How come this guy keeps getting re-elected?)

"Ponzi," who elsewhere in these pages has admitted to circumventing newspaper paywalls to get free-reads, seems to have a wide circle of family and friends with records. (I don't get why such people need to be ushered into federal employment.)

The perfectly logical, politically impossible, hard-ass Libertarian response is put out by "jnojr." I share his frustration and long for simplicity based on accountability, not political correctness.

Like me, genteel upper-middle North County "Visduh" doesn't believe Issa's stats on the prevalence of people with criminal records -- but what if he's right, and everyone we know is living a lie? Still, I don't like the idea of expunging criminal data bases: if we did that, Whitey Bulger would have been in the clear after his years of hiding-out in Santa Monica, and reporters would have nothing juicy to unearth.

The terrible bottom line is best expressed by despairing idealists "AlexClarke" and "MURPHYJUNK" who long for intelligent, honest representation from our elected officials. I have to say, I am with them.

Sept. 13, 2015

monoghan: To the best of my knowledge, if this bill passes, records will not be expunged. They will not be used in the case of a job applicant until the final stages. Records should not be expunged. If anything, we should come up with more computerized records. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 13, 2015

Oh, monahan, your descriptions of our little cabal of frequent posters of comments are great! I'm still chuckling.

Sept. 13, 2015

Yes, monaghan did a splendid job describing our major contributors. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 13, 2015

True, but he didn't mention Twister. Is Twister just too hard to describe?

Sept. 13, 2015

Visduh: Are you sure that monaghan is a he? Why monaghan left out Twister is a mystery for now. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 13, 2015

No, I should have typed he/she.

Sept. 13, 2015

Visduh: He/she is clumsy. There has to be something better. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 14, 2015

monahan, of course sharing a Google feature with the Reader is such an in propriety! I have no family members that I know of that have any criminal records. My lineage has no skeletons in the closet that I know of.

But I will share that my family was a family of service. They did not get rich, but they participated in the American experiment. And I am proud of them. One great (greaT) uncle could have changed the course of history. He got into a fight in Franklin PA over a barge dock. My relative got into a fight with John Wilkes Booth and almost killed him with a (quant pole. The fight was ended when Booth pulled a gun. The same gun that killed Lincoln a week later.

My grandfather fought in WWI in France, and his brother fought in WWII. My great uncle was a five-star general and took over command after General Douglas MacArthur, Commander of the UN and Pacific Fleet. Matthew Bunker Ridgway.

So while you make assumptions (I never said "family") and try to drag my family into the mud, know that those who you handle may be greater souls than your imagination could tell.

Sept. 13, 2015

I'm proud of my family too. Included Scottish Jews, Cherokees, perhaps some dark-colored folks from Africa, some Scandahoovians of some stripe, prostitutes, a Civil War physician, a slot-machine spooner, several drunks and wife-beaters, farmers, ranchers, drillers, a railroad man, a teamster (real teams and freight wagons), at least one homosexual, philanderers, and at least one failed real estate broker--the closest any of 'em came to dishonesty.

Sept. 13, 2015

Twister: Well, I think drunks, wife-beaters, philanderers, and prostitutes have at least a thin streak of dishonesty in them. I don't like to denigrate your ancestors; it's just a point of clarification. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 14, 2015

Show me purity and I'll show you hypocrisy.

Sept. 14, 2015

Twister: Amen. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 15, 2015

Ponzi: My mother's side of the family came to the Boston Bay Colony in the 1630s from England. There were two brothers. One was hanged for killing Indians. The family has insisted ever since that there was a war with Indians, and he was fighting in the forest. He didn't know a truce had been arranged, and he continued fighting. So he had to be hanged. I don't know that i believe that.

My father's side came to upstate New York in the 1730s from Germany. The progenitor charged that his first wife was a witch. She charged him with being a drunk and a child abuser. She disappeared. Hmmm. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 14, 2015

It is interesting to look up genealogical history. Websites such as ancestry.com and availability of inexpensive DNA tests have spurred interest in geneology But it can be hard to get reliable information when one looks centuries back. I recently had to throw a wet blanket on my first cousin's claim that we were direct descendants of Pocahontas. There is a path in my lineage to Pocahontas. Combined results of many DNA tests that ancestry.com compiled have shown that one of my ancestors in the path to Pocahontas wasn't biologically related to his listed parents. So I'm not Pocahontas' great-great-etc grandson after all.

Sept. 14, 2015

ImJustABill: My mother's side was related to John Brown -- you know, the one in the song, "John Brown's body lies a...." But John Brown was nutty as a fruitcake. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 14, 2015

Lord sakes, Ponzi, no offense intended! My description was based on your own comments, though admittedly I do not see mention of family criminals here. Indeed, your relatives sound like people to be proud of.

Many of you here seem to know a lot about your relatives and are amused if they were scoundrels and mountebanks. Fortunately none are present-day ranking members of Congress like Darryl Issa, inventor of the car alarm scourge of neighborhoods. Personally, I know little about my ancestors and, having seen photographs of Irish immigrants at Ellis Island in NYC, I am grateful to be left in the dark.

Sept. 25, 2015

The highest praise is sometimes in the form of faint damnation.

Sept. 13, 2015

Twister: The very highest praise one can get is vituperation from a no good s.o.b. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 13, 2015

You got dat right! Virtueperation.

Sept. 13, 2015

Twister: Virtueperation? Invective cloaked as piety? Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 14, 2015

Geo Pine: Why bark at a tree when it's so much fun to bark at moving cars? Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 13, 2015

jnojr: Why your attack on unions and pensions? Unions are the only way employees can have a voice in the workplace and pensions are the only way anyone can ever retire. The power of the employer is so great that the American middle class is becoming the American working poor class. The greatest thing about America is/was the large middle class brought to you by Unions. More and more of those who are reaching "retirement" age and are physically or medically unable to continue to work will "retire" in poverty.

Sept. 14, 2015

AlexClarke: Public sector unions are abusing power. Their excessive pensions are breaking some cities financially. In the private sector, it is the opposite. The unions have too little power. Salaries are too low and so are pensions. This is one reason for the alarming decline of the middle class. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 14, 2015

CA's annual expenses per prisoner are higher than most states due in large part to higher compensation for prison guards than most other states. This higher compensation is due in part to the heavy influence public employee unions have on CA government. http://calwatchdog.com/2011/05/25/jerry-brown-prisoner-of-the-union/

The union for the prison guards is clearly powerful and has been able to advocate (bribe?) public officials such as Gov. Brown for better benefits. But there is the potential for the prison guards' union to use their power and influence for something worse than advocating for better compensation. They could push legislators to make laws which put more people in prison which would lead to more money for prison guards and their union!

Of course, as a state we shouldn't have more people sent to prison just so the prison guards make more money. One would hope that the "tough-on-crime" position advocated for by prison guards union is solely motivated by a desire to protect citizens from criminals. One would hope that the prison guards and their union would have enough integrity to avoid using their influence to put more people in prison just so they could make more money.

Sorry but I don't trust a big powerful organization to forgo money and power in order to do have integrity and do the right thing. I don't know if there's proof but personally I would bet that at least part of the reason for keeping more people in prison in CA is to benefit prison employee unions.

Sept. 15, 2015

ImJustABill: A study should be made -- and maybe has been made -- of the lobbying influence of prison guards and private sector prison management companies. Do they lobby for laws that put more people in prison? Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 15, 2015

Gee had no idea Issa was so gangster.

Sept. 14, 2015

MichaelValentine: One wouldn't call Issa a gangster -- just somebody who got into a lot of trouble in his early days. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 14, 2015

Jack Smith: That is a sad story about your friend. It could have happened to anybody. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 14, 2015

Robin Eberle Campbell: This is one of the few places where the words "media" and "data" are plural (unless they are inside somebody else's quote.) So it should be "MediaMatter," in my minority opinion. Best, Don Bauder

Sept. 14, 2015

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories Fishing Report — What’s getting hooked from ship and shore From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town The Gonzo Report — Making the musical scene, or at least reporting from it Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Theater — On stage in San Diego this week Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close