4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Gambling backs $882 million Vikings stadium debt

San Diego promoter pushes New Jersey family’s model for Chargers venue

Architectural rendering of Minnesota's new stadium
Architectural rendering of Minnesota's new stadium

Ex–Cox cable honcho Bill Geppert says he's come up with a killer model for the new Mission Valley Chargers stadium being touted by Republican mayor Kevin Faulconer and his county supervisorial cohort Ron Roberts.

Bill Geppert

"Interestingly, Minneapolis is successfully completing a new stadium this year based on a model similar to [Faulconer's task force proposal], and has many similarities to San Diego. Minneapolis has a stronger corporate base while San Diego has a much larger mega-region of fan support to draw from," writes Geppert in a Union-Tribune opinion piece.

"Stadium costs are virtually identical at just over $1 billion. Their stadium includes a $200 million roof; a roof is not included in the San Diego plan. However, our construction costs will be higher with the project completion four years later than Minneapolis."

Says the op-ed, "the public contribution is below 50 percent in both cities with proposed team contributions for rent and operations between $10 million and $13 million, a true tale of two similar cities!"

Geppert continues: "The NFL said any new stadium deal must be similar to the newly built stadiums in approach and cost. Minneapolis is the ideal example for San Diego on many levels and it lines up with the [task force's] proposal.

According to Minnesota newspaper accounts, though, there is a substantial bit more to the Vikings stadium story.

A report last September 21 by Saint Paul's Pioneer Press describes a pricey deal that is sucking up tax money from an array of levies, including state corporate and gambling taxes.

"In January, the state sold $462 million in bonds to support the state and city of Minneapolis' $498 million contribution to the project," recounts the newspaper. "The team, after a recently announced increase, now is chipping in $525.6 million."

But that's not the total public cost of the deal, the newspaper notes.

"When all is said and done, the state is raising $1.6 billion in general fund revenues to cover $881.8 million in debt service."

In addition to paying off the mammoth construction debt, the paper says, "part of the remaining $692 million will be spent on other expenses related to the stadium deal, including grant money to the city of St. Paul, payments for the city of Minneapolis for stadium operating and capital reserve, and appropriations to the Commissioner of Human Services for problem-gambling treatment programs."

The treatment of gamblers is germane, as their money plays a major role in financing the football venue, the paper notes.

"Data from Minnesota Management and Budget provided to the Pioneer Press show the state is projecting roughly $7 million a year in taxes on charitable games to help pay off the stadium bonds. That would be $241 million over 30 years, 27 percent of the total $881 million debt service."

The story continues, "E-pulltabs grabbed public attention early in the stadium-financing discussion, touted as the spark that would supercharge charitable gaming overall and throw off enough tax revenue to pay the state's entire $348 million piece of the $1 billion stadium. Instead, they fizzled and were replaced last year by other revenue sources."

Smokers are also being hit up: "$26.5 million in one-time cigarette tax money is credited to the account in the first year."

Zygi Wilf
Joseph Wilf

In addition, "starting in 2021, sales tax revenue from Minneapolis starts to flow in each year, starting at $19.4 million and rising to $37.5 million by 2045."

Ironically, all of that Minnesota tax money is being used to subsidize a wealthy New Jersey family with longtime ties to San Diego politicos.

As first reported here in April 2001,members of the wealthy Wilf family, owners of the Vikings, have given heavily to local officials, including ex–mayor Dick Murphy, ex–mayor Bob Filner, GOP mayor Faulconer, and Democratic city councilman David Alvarez, as well as to ex–city councilman Carl DeMaio, on behalf of the Wilfs’ giant residential development outfit Garden Communities.

Many of the Wilf Murphy donors were identified as retirees, although listed elsewhere as having active ties to the family business. The company didn't respond to phone calls.

Reached at home in New Jersey, Joseph Wilf declined to go into details about his Murphy money. "My interest? Actually, I am not used to giving interviews on the telephone. It's kind of unusual. Our name is known in the San Diego area. Why should I respond on the phone? I have no information."

Mario Dudzinski, a Wilf employee in New Jersey, responded, "I'm very civic-minded, just leave it at that."

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Eucalyptus transformed San Diego landscape, oleander sends me over the edge

Our rare Engelmann oaks, our most endangered plants, illustrated guide to local palms, a Fall guide to Zoo flora
Next Article

Seven-fold growth in area near Rose Creek

Will nature-lovers get park in east Pacific Beach?
Architectural rendering of Minnesota's new stadium
Architectural rendering of Minnesota's new stadium

Ex–Cox cable honcho Bill Geppert says he's come up with a killer model for the new Mission Valley Chargers stadium being touted by Republican mayor Kevin Faulconer and his county supervisorial cohort Ron Roberts.

Bill Geppert

"Interestingly, Minneapolis is successfully completing a new stadium this year based on a model similar to [Faulconer's task force proposal], and has many similarities to San Diego. Minneapolis has a stronger corporate base while San Diego has a much larger mega-region of fan support to draw from," writes Geppert in a Union-Tribune opinion piece.

"Stadium costs are virtually identical at just over $1 billion. Their stadium includes a $200 million roof; a roof is not included in the San Diego plan. However, our construction costs will be higher with the project completion four years later than Minneapolis."

Says the op-ed, "the public contribution is below 50 percent in both cities with proposed team contributions for rent and operations between $10 million and $13 million, a true tale of two similar cities!"

Geppert continues: "The NFL said any new stadium deal must be similar to the newly built stadiums in approach and cost. Minneapolis is the ideal example for San Diego on many levels and it lines up with the [task force's] proposal.

According to Minnesota newspaper accounts, though, there is a substantial bit more to the Vikings stadium story.

A report last September 21 by Saint Paul's Pioneer Press describes a pricey deal that is sucking up tax money from an array of levies, including state corporate and gambling taxes.

"In January, the state sold $462 million in bonds to support the state and city of Minneapolis' $498 million contribution to the project," recounts the newspaper. "The team, after a recently announced increase, now is chipping in $525.6 million."

But that's not the total public cost of the deal, the newspaper notes.

"When all is said and done, the state is raising $1.6 billion in general fund revenues to cover $881.8 million in debt service."

In addition to paying off the mammoth construction debt, the paper says, "part of the remaining $692 million will be spent on other expenses related to the stadium deal, including grant money to the city of St. Paul, payments for the city of Minneapolis for stadium operating and capital reserve, and appropriations to the Commissioner of Human Services for problem-gambling treatment programs."

The treatment of gamblers is germane, as their money plays a major role in financing the football venue, the paper notes.

"Data from Minnesota Management and Budget provided to the Pioneer Press show the state is projecting roughly $7 million a year in taxes on charitable games to help pay off the stadium bonds. That would be $241 million over 30 years, 27 percent of the total $881 million debt service."

The story continues, "E-pulltabs grabbed public attention early in the stadium-financing discussion, touted as the spark that would supercharge charitable gaming overall and throw off enough tax revenue to pay the state's entire $348 million piece of the $1 billion stadium. Instead, they fizzled and were replaced last year by other revenue sources."

Smokers are also being hit up: "$26.5 million in one-time cigarette tax money is credited to the account in the first year."

Zygi Wilf
Joseph Wilf

In addition, "starting in 2021, sales tax revenue from Minneapolis starts to flow in each year, starting at $19.4 million and rising to $37.5 million by 2045."

Ironically, all of that Minnesota tax money is being used to subsidize a wealthy New Jersey family with longtime ties to San Diego politicos.

As first reported here in April 2001,members of the wealthy Wilf family, owners of the Vikings, have given heavily to local officials, including ex–mayor Dick Murphy, ex–mayor Bob Filner, GOP mayor Faulconer, and Democratic city councilman David Alvarez, as well as to ex–city councilman Carl DeMaio, on behalf of the Wilfs’ giant residential development outfit Garden Communities.

Many of the Wilf Murphy donors were identified as retirees, although listed elsewhere as having active ties to the family business. The company didn't respond to phone calls.

Reached at home in New Jersey, Joseph Wilf declined to go into details about his Murphy money. "My interest? Actually, I am not used to giving interviews on the telephone. It's kind of unusual. Our name is known in the San Diego area. Why should I respond on the phone? I have no information."

Mario Dudzinski, a Wilf employee in New Jersey, responded, "I'm very civic-minded, just leave it at that."

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

A fine time for Phở Hóa

Lessons learned from eating the same thing again and again
Next Article

One Season Brewing debuts within TRVLR Coffee

There’s kombucha, electric skateboards, and bicycles for sale too
Comments
1

Options for a NEW football stadium: • First off (WE) San Diego is being re-active to the football stadium! We asked for a stadium-the Chargers asked for a stadium 3-4 years ago, and NO body budged! NOW that there is a threat of losing the Chargers we are reacting! • So, Option 1-The team doesn't get a realistic good deal so they move to LA-Carson. • Option 2-reconstruct Mission Valley: Advantages: 1. Lease costly- there is already pre built construction. 2. It's centrally located. 3. It's the quickest solution. Disadvantages: 1. The traffic around there is already crazy, even on NON-Game events. 2. It's a band-aid because out of 4-5 locations, it's the worse for a new stadium. 3. We need a new convention center AND airport! We keep putting band-aids on these items, but the truth is we NEED ALL 3 of these venues. (if we are going to continue to grow!) We should be proactive and build ALL 3 of these necessities! Especially the football stadium AND the convention center! 4. look at #1! • Option 3 & 4-Chula Vista & Oceanside-both viable, but expensive!

• Option 5-Noone has brought this up, but not only does the Indian Reservation have A LOT of land, they probably would love to have you build on it! I have a suspicion that they would pay for 50% of this.

A. with ALL the land they have, we can build a new stadium, an airport with TWO runways, (LA has 4-5 airports in their surrounding area) AND a new convention center. B. The casinos can be allowed to build new hotel & resorts (80% of their own and 20% others). C. this would create mass transit from San Diego to the Indian Reservation-Casinos. D. This would create a TON of jobs! E. This would alleviate traffic congestion. F. the BEST ways to build a city AND bring more money to a city is: 1. Out of country $$(from individuals flying into San Diego, for gambling, & visiting.) 2. Out of state $$ (from individuals flying into San Diego, for gambling, & visiting.) 3. Out of city $$ (from individuals flying into San Diego, for gambling, & visiting.) G. (being repetitive) The casino-reservation would put up 50% of the money for this project NOT the citizens!! With 50% of the money put up by the reservation-casinos-we can afford tickets AND food at the game!

June 22, 2015

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close