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United States supervisory Border Patrol agent Armando Gonzalez was sentenced today (December 14) to 21 months in prison for secreting a camera in a women's restroom to capture images.

The camera had been placed in a floor drain of the women's restroom at the Chula Vista Border Patrol station for a year and a half. Gonzalez spent a lot of time editing, naming, and saving the videos, according to the United States Attorney's office.

Gonzalez pleaded guilty in May to seven counts of video voyeurism and one count of making a false statement to a federal officer. Gonzalez admitted that when his superiors queried him, he claimed that he had placed the camera there to conduct a drug investigation of one of his female employees.

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Comments

Visduh Dec. 14, 2015 @ 8:17 p.m.

Don, usually when one of these malefactors is convicted of a crime, the "lamestream" media, such as the Light News, will take pains to identify him (or occasionally her) as "ex-" or "former". You didn't say he was a "former" BP agent, nor did you describe him as an "ex-border patrol agent." So, does that mean that he is still employed by that enforcement agency? Will he lose his job, or will this prison sentence be served while he's on leave of absence? And then what?

This sort of misconduct would result in the immediate dismissal of an employee from any private sector job, and many public sector positions. Is law enforcement, more specifically the border patrol, exempt from purging its ranks of those who engage in criminal activity while on duty? A lot of questions, for sure, but inquiring minds want to know.

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AlexClarke Dec. 15, 2015 @ 6:24 a.m.

As I understand it this Agent resigned and took a plea deal. Many in both public and private employment often resign (quit) before their employer can take 'official' action. It is often in the best interest of the employee to quit. The DA will usually take a plea deal as it counts as a conviction.

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Intense Dec. 15, 2015 @ 7:02 a.m.

Border Patrol is a federal job, and with that, are GS employees. It's extremely difficult to fire GS employees but since they are federally employed, if they commit crimes they are usually fired or resign once convicted.

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Don Bauder Dec. 15, 2015 @ 11:28 a.m.

Intense: That is a good explanation. Best, Don Bauder

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AlexClarke Dec. 16, 2015 @ 7:24 a.m.

Intense: Even though he was Civil Service and had due process protection he would have been fired. All an employer who is signed to a contract with their employees has to do is terminate for cause including immediate termination. In this case the termination was imminent so he resigned. It is a myth that employees, Federal or otherwise, can not be fired but it is true that they have to be fired for cause not just because.

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Don Bauder Dec. 15, 2015 @ 11:24 a.m.

Visduh: He is no longer with the government, according to a spokesperson for the border patrol. He was under consideration for firing; he may have resigned first. I didn't go further into it. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Dec. 15, 2015 @ 11:27 a.m.

AlexClarke: He kept the video copies in a hidden place where he worked with the border patrol. It seems to me that with all his admissions as the case proceeded, the government had the right to fire him, but he may have resigned first. Best, Don Bauder

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Flapper Dec. 15, 2015 @ 2:19 p.m.

Did he do his editing on BP/taxpayers' dimes? Must he make restitution and be fined on top of it?

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Don Bauder Dec. 15, 2015 @ 9:18 p.m.

Flapper: Since he did some of his work at the office, I suppose you could argue that taxpayers were picking up part of the tab. Best, Don Bauder

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Flapper Dec. 15, 2015 @ 9:36 p.m.

"God is in the details." --Mies van der Rohe

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Don Bauder Dec. 16, 2015 @ 12:17 p.m.

Flapper: Do God and Satan jockey for position in the details? Best, Don Bauder

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