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Banned boy of business talk radio

Jacob Cooper of Total Wealth Management got kickbacks

Jacob Cooper
Jacob Cooper

Jacob Cooper, head of Total Wealth Management and former host of a KOGO radio show, Uncommon Wealth, on Monday (August 17) was banned from the securities industry by the chief administrative law judge of the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Judge Brenda P. Murray wrote that "Cooper's violations of the anti-fraud provisions [of securities law] were egregious." Cooper recruited investors and then took kickbacks from the firms whose investments he was touting without informing those investors.

Among other things, Cooper admitted that he took investor funds to pay legal fees to fight the securities agency's charges.

Reader articles chronicling the demise of Jacob Cooper's career:

April 15, 2014

August 27, 2014

February 5, 2015

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Jacob Cooper
Jacob Cooper

Jacob Cooper, head of Total Wealth Management and former host of a KOGO radio show, Uncommon Wealth, on Monday (August 17) was banned from the securities industry by the chief administrative law judge of the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Judge Brenda P. Murray wrote that "Cooper's violations of the anti-fraud provisions [of securities law] were egregious." Cooper recruited investors and then took kickbacks from the firms whose investments he was touting without informing those investors.

Among other things, Cooper admitted that he took investor funds to pay legal fees to fight the securities agency's charges.

Reader articles chronicling the demise of Jacob Cooper's career:

April 15, 2014

August 27, 2014

February 5, 2015

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Comments
64

He looks like a Mormon. They have that inbred look.

Aug. 20, 2015

Ponzi: I will not single out Mormons, but I can say that business regulation is extremely lax in Utah. This case was brought by a federal agency while Total Wealth Management was in San Diego. I believe I read on the SEC website that Cooper now lives in Utah. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 20, 2015

And the conservatives want me to take control of my own pension and investing. They call it personal responsibility and freedom. I call it stupidity and fraud.

Aug. 20, 2015

AlexClarke: You should take control of your pension and investing. If you don't understand these topics, then hire a financial planner. Do NOT give your money to someone to invest. The money should go in a bank, and the investment advisor can only tell the bank to make certain moves for you. The money should never be under the adviser's control. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 20, 2015

Perhaps KOGO should do a better job of vetting their weekend hosts. The lines between commercial and infomercial and talk show have been blurred.

Aug. 20, 2015

ImJustABill: In these days, the radio investment advisers can go on any station as long as they pay for their time. I don't think the adviser is vetted...at least, seriously vetted. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 20, 2015

KOGO should do a better job of vetting their on-air "personalities" and their news director. During the week the "news" staff keeps promoting the new stadium, and the afternoon guy, now paired with Carl DeMaio, puts out some remarkable drivel.

Aug. 20, 2015

Visduh: One of the problems of the subsidized stadium scam is that local media will almost always slant the news in favor of subsidies -- quite often, egregiously so. That's because media make so much money off sports. It's a major reason that it is so difficult to fight this billionaires' scam. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 21, 2015

The funny thing is, I made that comment because I thought he had that "look." Then a while ago, I googled his name and low and behold, he IS a mormon.

I found this March story in The Salt Lake City Tribune, it says "A number of alleged victims in the San Diego area are members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. On a Total Wealth web page, Cooper touts his two-year Mormon mission in New England and boasts that he is an Eagle Scout." "Jacob Cooper used his Mormon affiliation to induce fellow Mormons in San Diego to invest. He robbed them of their money using their trust in a fellow Mormon — a perverse use of the religion."

So he ran an affinity scam it appears, fleecing his own flock.

BTW, I have heard non-Mormons do not even get fair trials or justice in Utah. If you are not a Mormon and are in a civil or criminal trial, your outcome will be different than if you were Mormon. Utah is a beautiful state, but I could never live there because it would be like living a real-life Peyton Place or Stepford Wives.

Aug. 20, 2015

Ponzi: I may have written those words myself. I just don't remember. I am pretty sure I wrote about his bragging about going on a mission and being an Eagle Scout.

Yes, if he was attracting fellow Mormons, it was an affinity scam. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 20, 2015

This whole thread, with its anti-Mormon theme, is probably going to be removed. Utah "justice" can be very flawed. It took them years to decide that the guy who kidnapped 14-year-old Elizabeth Smart and held her captive for months was sane. Anyplace else would have looked at the sophistication of the crime and deduced that in about six seconds. There are a couple of other criminal cases, one with some local interest, that were tried in Utah that had everyone shaking their heads. But it isn't that the Utah juries always "hang the defendant" at all. They come across as confused, unsure, and incapable of making decisions. Makes ya' wondah.

Aug. 20, 2015

Why would this thread be removed? Don has been diplomatic. It is only my statements that are critical of Mormons. There is nothing dishonest in what I have written. The Reader has typically not be too much of a PC police or language moderator.

Mormons, in my opinion are a cult. They are no more authentic than The Church of Scientology, Hare Krishna or Jehovah's Witnesses. To remove my remarks, which I deem more as observation than hatefulness, are my opinion. Unless you are a mormon, I would not worry about the lack of political correctness on my part or The Readers. Mormons are considered a cult by 67% of Americans in the most recent polls when Mitt Romney was a candidate. Mormons obviously don't have enough support to seat a president and they don't have a lot of respect from "traditional" Christians. Mr. God and Mrs. God on the mormon planet Kolob await you.

Aug. 20, 2015

Ponzi: Where do you draw the line between a religion and a cult? We had a relative (now deceased) whose son joined Jehovah's Witnesses. The mother found the group extremely clannish and considered her son lost. I have come across yard signs saying "Witnesses stay away." We don't let them in when they come to our house to proselytize. But is it a cult or a fanatical wing of Christianity? Interesting. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 21, 2015

Visduh: It has always bothered me that so many multi-level marketing scams are based in Utah. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 21, 2015

If those multi-levels recruit LDS members, there is a receptivity among Mormons to things presented by other Mormons. Not all the MLM's are bogus, but all require a degree of faith. And the LDS church demands a large degree of faith.

On a more personal level, I've had dealings with students over the years who were Mormon. They were consistently better students, respectful and hard working, and often very bright. I think what they had that others tended to lack were those family values. But what I was seeing wasn't characteristic of some cultists, blindly following some odd dogma.

Just my opinion, and opinions do vary.

Aug. 21, 2015

Visduh: One of the reasons I am a religious skeptic is that I don't take things on faith -- or, I should say, I consciously avoid taking things on faith. (I realize that when you drive across a bridge, you have faith that it is safe.) Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 21, 2015

So going with the trend - I wonder if anyone else has seen the musical "Book of Mormon" - from the South Park guys and Robert Lopez. It's not for the easily offended - the musical pulls no punches in making fun of the Mormon religion (as well as making fun of many other things). But I don't mind controversial humor and satire; in my opinion it was truly brilliant and hilarious.

Aug. 21, 2015

ImJustABill: I have not seen the "Book of Mormon," but I'm sure I would enjoy it. I have no religion and belong to the American Humanist Association. Like you, I don't mind controversial humor and sharp-witted satire. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 21, 2015

Utah is a beautiful state, and the people are very nice in casual encounters. I have, however, had one spooky experience there. While on a camping/exploration trip 'way out in the "outback," I encountered a deputy sheriff by the name of Jeffs. I can't put my finger on anything specific, but I did put on my best "country charm" face to ease his suspicions and he let me go on my way. Without my bs ability, however, things might have been different. One does feel, however, that one is "not in So Cal anymore." And the feeling of a kind of "Stepford Wives" pall is inescapable (npi). But perhaps it is my imagination working overtime.

IS there any distinction between a religion and a cult? The mind works in mysterious ways. For example, is San Diego State University a cult? If not, why is its motto "Leadership starts here?" "Leadership" is inherent in authoritarianism. It is power over others. To the degree that I a subordinate, I am enslaved.

The mind can be placed into a spooky kind of "neutral" by circumstances, by the environment in which it finds itself. This can be established by producing a lot of DISTRACTIONS. Noisy environments. Fear helps too. Divide your attention and you are controllable by outside forces. I know because this has happened to me. And I have been trained (by myself and others) to not allow distractions to divert my attention. Still, I was victimized. Koyaanisqatsi. If you haven't seen the film, do.

Were I the president of UCSD, I would change the motto to something like "Anti-leadership starts here."

Look at how deception works in government. Politicians of any stripe "know" that to survive in the deception game that is campaigning and controlling that challengers must be defined as OUTSIDERS by labeling their objections rude. And by never answering the question asked, but by "answering" a question that they insert in its place. Do not fall for this! Persist, persist, PERSIST! Never, never, NEVER GIVE UP! (Churchill or ?)

Continued . . .

Aug. 21, 2015

Twister: It is always interesting -- and sometimes amusing -- to see politicians duck questions by answering a question that was not asked.

I will tell you one thing, though: I am utterly disgusted with the 2016 election and it is only August of 2015. However, there is a barrel of laughs listening to some of those pols managing to say nothing with such conviction. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 21, 2015

Continued . . .

Politicians and their overpaid lackeys are masters at this game, and they know that they can almost always get away with anything because they can just wait their serfs out until they have to go home and take care of their kids, spray their lawn green, or the uncountable other insults that "flesh is heir to." For this reason (among others) do not cooperate. Go to the place where their "town hall" meetings and other traps are being conducted, and conduct your own. Don't take their measly two-minute bones, but BE DISCIPLINED. Make every word count, and don't become distracted. Don't make complex statements. Consider one question at a time. Get together with other citizens and let the spokesperson role rotate amongst the group. DO NOT RANT, but BE FIRM, IMMOVABLE. If you decide upon a strategy that includes "testimony" "before" the High Priests (as they see themselves), Make ONE statement, ask one question, and reserve the balance of your time, asking for an answer. If none is forthcoming, firmly, IN CONTROL OF YOURSELF, ask it again and again until your time is up. Then, the following speaker is set up to ask the same question again, again demanding an answer. Do not ask any other questions until that one is answered, or simply state "Let the record show that this question was not answered," and move on to other questions. Meanwhile, the bulk of your group is outside, explaining to the media what your gripes are.

Enough for now . . .

Aug. 21, 2015

Twister: Donald Trump, is the author of a book called, I think, "The Art of the Deal." He claims he is an expert negotiator. Can you imagine negotiating anything with that guy? Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 21, 2015

Lack of negotiation can be a good thing in some ways.

I think a lot of voters are tired of candidates with campaigns carefully crafted to obey policies advocated by wealthy and powerful donors and to adhere carefully to politically correct speech doctrines advocated by many news media.

I don't think Trump has negotiated with party leaders and big campaign donors from Wall Street, big corporations, media, etc and carefully selected his words and policy positions based on those negotiations. I'd be willing to be that Jeb Bush and HRC have.

Trump and Bernie Sanders represent many voters who are fed up with the status quo of presidential politics.

Aug. 22, 2015

ImJustABill: I agree. These are points in Trump's favor. He has his own money (presumably enough to finance his campaign) and doesn't have to salute the Koch brothers. He is an outsider among party leaders. However, he does pander to his audience. He has a remarkably self-serving shtick: he says "Art of the Deal" is his second favorite book and the Bible is his favorite.

Bernie Sanders is sending a message that should have been sent to voters decades ago. Polls have shown that Americans do not understand how steep the wealth and income disparity is, and the economic dangers it presents. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 22, 2015

Income inequality is a big issue now. I think there are a lot of savvy ways that income inequality has been covered up. I think the low interest rates and easy credit of the past few decades tend to mask the real problems somewhat. We are slowly boiling frogs.

Aug. 22, 2015

ImJustABill: I have been harping on the wealth and income disparity subject for decades -- even when I wrote for the U-T, which approved -- encouraged, actually -- the idea of the superrich getting richer and the poor getting poorer.

I don't like use of the word "inequality." I don't think wealth and income should be equal among all categories of individuals.That's communism, and even communist societies such as China don't practice it. I believe that for our own economic salvation, we have to lift up the middle class, partly by heavily taxing the superrich. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 22, 2015

I had to look up the exact definitions of "disparity" vs. "inequality" to understand your point. I agree "disparity" is a much better word than "inequality". Some level of inequality isn't necessarily bad. There has to be some level of income inequality for market incentives to work properly. A disparity is an unfair distribution of income which is clearly a problem.

Aug. 22, 2015

ImJustABill: If all incomes were equal, we would take incentives out of the system. That would hurt economically, as you point out. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 23, 2015

S'Trumps me . . .

Aug. 21, 2015

Twister: He gave a speech in Mobile, Alabama tonight (August 21). Trump was really pandering to the Southern mentality. He can out-redneck any redneck. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 21, 2015

Twister: I haven't read satirists using Trump as a verb. E.g.: the Bible Trumps "Art of the Deal." Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 22, 2015

They ain't had to deal with sumbuddy what puts avery thang on hits haid.

It might have been A.R. Martin who said to keep monetary transactions out of the bedroom. Love is ideal, not A deal.

Christ threw the money-changers out of the "temple," but he didn't tell them not to change money. This may be one of the most crucial and ignored distinctions of all time. No wonder there's an Ashley Madison website! "Come on ba-by, let's do the . . . "

Aug. 22, 2015

Twister: I had no idea that "Come on, baby, let's do the twist!" was created and named for you. I should have thought of that long ago. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 23, 2015

In my opinion a "cult" is any social or religious establishment that has a history of former "participants" escaping, leaving, complaining or having an overwhelming effect on their lifestyle. There are numerous accounts of people escaping from cults or being "rescued" from them. There are not so many accounts of people "escaping" from say, the Catholic Church for example, because its grip is not as tight as other cults like Mormons, Church of Scientology, etc.

There are scores of books and published stories about people "escaping" from the LDS. The LDS also does not remove the defrocked or drop out members. They keep them on the roles to make it look like they have many more active members than they actually do.

Another theme of a cult is to humiliate, drive a wedge between family members, and generally become hostile to former members. That is not a "Christian" attitude, it is a cult that does not want someone who has "seen the light" to help others escape from their grip.

You can join many religious congregations and leave without much fuss. With Mormons, if you leave, there is a an intervention. They threaten people, they divide families and they behave like catty ignorant folks because you have the brains and guts to leave a stupid religion that wrapped the Book of Mormon around the bible. Joseph Smith, their prophet, was a con artist that would make these Reader stories if it were set in that time. He was jailed for fraud while he was running for president of the United States and an angry mob killed him in his jail cell. Quite a role model. That is not the same as Jesus dying on the cross, but Mormons honor him as a martyr.

The Mormons like to convert Christians because it seems so similar. And why not, if you are already a Christian, it doesn't take too much tugging to get you to believe other nonsense. They release their information slowly. The Mormons have a saying "why give them meat when milk will do." Mormons may be "nice people" but they also are taught to believe that it is okay to lie if it promotes a higher cause for their religion. Mitt Romney, the biggest liar and flip flopper ever in politics proved this point beyond a doubt. Robert G. Allen, the "No Money Down" real estate scammer who rose to popularity in the 80's is also a Mormon.

Aug. 21, 2015

Ponzi: A person who will accept religious dogma completely on faith is often a sucker for a scam offering instant -- and non-credible -- riches. I have seen it many times through the years: a scam telling investors they will make 100 percent a year on their money will use a religion-based spiel. For example, the salesman will start the meeting with a prayer. That salesman will also invoke God in his pitch.

If you go to a get-rich-quick seminar that uses religion as a come-on, get up and leave. You are about to be fleeced. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 22, 2015

My late cousin, when he was about five, was taken to church by his parents (it was the Great Depression, and they were trying anything--although his father was a bootlegger and doing pretty well). This kid did a lot of squirming (he would be diagnosed with ADHD today, and stuffed with drugs by the modern medical establishment) during the sermon. At one point he had had enough and yelled out "BULLSHIT" as loudly as he could.

"That's my boy!" said my uncle, beaming with pride. They were not invited to join the church.

Many years later, the Lord smote my cousin with cancer, as she/he did a friend of my a few days ago. My bootlegger uncle was smitten with a heart attack, and was dead by the time his face hit the ground at 95. The wages of sin . . .

So skeptics beware!

Aug. 22, 2015

Twister: Although I do not drink, I love to read about persons who smoke five packs of cigarettes a day and drink a quart of whiskey each day and live to be 103. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 22, 2015

How did you know? If'n he'd jest got rat wi' th' lawd, he'd be in hayvun t'day. "If th' ocean wuz whisky, and I wuz a duck, I'd dive to the bottom and never come up." Sum folk's greatest feers is other folk's hayvun. He mighta made it to 133 wi' th' lawd on his side.

Aug. 22, 2015

Twister: I do believe you have a future as a faith healer in the Appalachians. Have you missed your calling? Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 22, 2015

Tu interlectual fer me.

Aug. 22, 2015

Don Bauder: I said, "the Appalachians." How many scholars will you encounter there? Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 23, 2015

"That's our boy. Put out the cheese." --Jason Robards. In: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5BDxqhI9qDw

Aug. 22, 2015

Twister: I don't want to be around after the Apocalypse. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 22, 2015

Wun feller's hayvun is another's Apocalypse. Maybe it's already happened; we've just got the time-scale wrong.

"Nature [God] has shrugged off countless species in the history of the earth, and she will shrug off Homo sap[iens] with no more regard that any she has any of the others." --Louis B. Ziegler

Aug. 22, 2015

Twister: Except homo sapiens are likely to kill themselves off before Nature gets around to doing it. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 22, 2015

And here's a corrected copy of this quote:

"Nature [God] has shrugged off countless species in the history of the earth, and she will shrug off Homo sap[iens] with no more regard than any she has any of the others." --Louis B. Ziegler

Aug. 22, 2015

Twister: It's Ziegler's Zinger. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 23, 2015

. . . and you should actually watch the movie. Although it could be edited down, it's full of stuff (especially from the dog) that you would like.

Aug. 22, 2015

Twister: I wish you wouldn't keep referring to dogs. I worry enough about my portfolio now. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 23, 2015

Re: Don Bauder Aug. 22, 2015 @ 4:05 p.m.

"Twister: Except homo [sic] sapiens are [sic] likely to kill themselves off before Nature gets around to doing it. Best, Don Bauder"

Beware, the Homo sapiens singularity might be near . . .

And Nature (God) is neutral, indifferent--frankly doesn't give a damn.) Where in the Hell do you think the expression comes from?

Extinction comes about in wondrously varied ways, from asteroid impacts, to climate change, to "busts" (usually preceded by extra-large booms, depending upon context), to just being old-fashioned and context changes away from those required by the organism, nay, sometimes deadly to it. This last actually covers all the preceding, but I didn't want to stretch too far beyond the familiar. Some crash suddenly, some dwindle over very long (to us) periods.

The most unusual thing about Homo sap. is that "he," like maggots, "thinks" (as in believes) that more is always better. There is no real concept of sufficiency, of enough. So this wise sap thinks he can escape even farther from the laws of Nature by using culture to escape evolutionary pressures the way "he" has for the last, say, ten or fifteen thousand years. There have been bottlenecks, but "he" has narrowly avoided extinction--so far.

But the next bottleneck may be a fatal snare and delusion. The population will be large, and genetic diversity will be wide, but barely an inch (or a silly millimeter?) deep. A slight shift in the composition of atmospheric gasses, a nuclear "accident" that compounds out of "control," or some Dr. Strangelove pushing the initial button--you know, those kinds of things, could bring about a big, big crash in the H. sap. population BIG TIME. "We" would be lucky to have conditions as good as those illustrated by "A Boy and His Dog." Every God has his apoplectic/Apocalyptic day, eh? In so many ways the context is likely to change beyond our genetic model, however wide it might be. But be of good cheer—“after all,” as Scarlett said, “tomorrow is another day. [we’ll] think about that tomorrow.” (Apologies Margaret Mitchell)

Best of all POSSIBLE worlds, Tw

PS: See Wylie, Philip. Tomorrow and Tomorrow and Tomorrow

Aug. 22, 2015

Twister: The biggest cause of extinction is greed. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 23, 2015

Koyaanisqatsii.

Aug. 23, 2015

Twister: Oh yeah? Etaoin shrdlu. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 23, 2015

Twister: Sorry for the grammatical slip -- a singular error, to be sure. Yes, homo sapiens thinks that more is aways better. However, execrable greed is worse in some eras than others. This is one of the bad eras. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 24, 2015

"I don't think wealth and income should be equal among all categories of individuals. That's communism, and even communist societies such as China don't practice it. I believe that for our own economic salvation, we have to lift up the middle class, partly by heavily taxing the superrich. Best, Don Bauder"

Once people were social (from the Latin, socius, meaning partner, cooperator). They realized that a social species succeeds by cooperation, and initially hoarders and other “individualists” were cast out of the group if they failed to share. Even capuchin monkeys do this. But we have largely SOLD this birthright for a mess of pottage we call capitalism, fascism, communism, etc., “isms” that are really a lot of hype designed to suck in the suckers who will subordinate themselves to a central authority. But when we stopped roaming and started settling, we initiated a trend toward institutionalizing centralized hoarding, and were even conned into worshiping the hoarders. (This goes on and on, but I feel merciful today, so will spare you the tangles in the web we have wrought into a confining cocoon for ourselves.)

But the instinct for cooperation will not die. In fact it both draws us together and confines us to corporate systems that robs us of our minds whilst using them—ONLY for corporate purposes, and frees us to a limited extent when we “rave.” But even the Burning Man has become a commercial enterprise, limited only to those who subscribe to anachronistic ceremony that clouds our minds rather than giving them the promised deliverance into a world transformed back into a giving way of living.

The irony may come to be more widely recognized, but the tiny fragment that survives and opts for substance over ceremony, may yet deliver on its latent potential.

Tw PS: Were the one percent any less wealthy when they paid a tax rate of 90%? Was their tendency to be robber barons adversely affected? Were they reluctant to "invest in America? Were they stimulated to "invest" more, or less?

Aug. 23, 2015

Read "Coming Apart" by Charles Murray. He predicts the course of our society; increasingly isolated cognitive elite, a merging of the cognitive elite with the affluent, a deteriorating quality of life for people at the bottom end of the cognitive distribution. Unchecked, these trends will lead the U.S. toward something resembling a caste society, with the underclass mired ever more firmly at the bottom and the cognitive elite ever more firmly anchored at the top, restructuring the rules of society so that it becomes harder and harder for them to lose.

Another decent book by Murray is "By the People: Rebuilding Liberty Without Permission" "Our legal system is increasingly lawless, unmoored from traditional ideas of “the rule of law.” The legislative process has become systemically corrupt no matter which party is in control."

Aug. 23, 2015

Ponzi: The concept of a merging of the cognitive elite with the affluent is quite interesting. Perhaps Murray believes that we had such a merging centuries ago in Europe when the only people who could read and write were of the cloth; in the French Revolution, the rebels attacked both the superrich and the clergy.

Today, I question that there is a merging of intellectuals and the affluent. Oh, of course, many affluent are also intellectuals, but many intellectuals are contemptuous of the greed that marks today's affluent. But such a merging could definitely take place.

We are already seeing a society in which the underclass is kept sinking to lower and lower levels by actions of the affluent and their puppets, the politicians. Some in the cognitive elite approve, but many do not. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 24, 2015

Twister: When the upper 1 percent were taxed at 90 percent, as during the Eisenhower years, there were all kinds of tax dodges, and lawyers who specialized in tax avoidance (and evasion) schemes, just as there are today. I suspect that offshore tax havens were used LESS in those days. I realize that is definitely counter-intuitive. I don't have any data to back up that assumption, other than that there are far more tax havens now than there were then, and I suspect that much more money, adjusted for inflation, flows into them now.

Supply side economics was supposed to induce people to take their money out of offshore havens and pay much lower taxes in the U.S. That was a silly notion to begin with: the people who had money in tax haven banks had had it there illegally. You think they were going to come out of the closet?

Also, executives were supposed to work harder if their taxes were lowered. That was a silly dream, too.

The fact is that the U.S. and many other countries slashed taxes of the rich and superrich entirely too much under Reagan and George W. Bush. We have to raise the affluent's taxes to retain the societal and economic stability we once had. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 23, 2015

Thank you for the well-considered and informed response.

Tw

PS: I ain't seen no pigs flying lately.

Aug. 24, 2015

Twister: You haven't looked hard enough. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 24, 2015

Oh, do you mean those piggy's attached to drones being delivered by those one-breasted wimmen?

Aug. 24, 2015

Twister: It's only Hormel delivering pork. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 24, 2015

Re: Ponzi Aug. 23, 2015 @ 2:53 p.m.

First, my dear Ponzi, I am far more interested in your ideas than Murray's.

Second, Murray made the same error as Hobbes when he correlated low intelligence of black people with their skin color or "primitiveness," presuming that their lives were, or would be, " . . . solitary, poor, nasty, brutish, and short." Both of their "researches" were hokum, restricted to presumptions not in evidence and/or ill-controlled "experiment." Both jumped to unwarranted conclusions and failed to lay solid foundations under their speculations drawn from faulty statistics and assumptions.

From the sparse exposure I have had to Murray (via TV), I did not get an impression of a Great Intellect, but more of an emotion-driven personality cloaked in pseudo-intellectual clothing and a veneer of contrived "calm" common to narcissists.

I could, of course, be quite wrong about this, because to assume so would place me in the same class as Hobbes and Murray. But rightly or wrongly, I am not tempted to suffer the indignity of being sent to the library in the midst of a discussion or debate--I have too much respect for my adversaries and colleagues than that.

This is not that I do not believe that this culture is not coming apart, yea, I agree that society (in the sense of a cooperative rather than a competitive impulse at root) is being displaced by a culture that knows no limits and therefore must come apart.

I also agree with the concept of "By the People: Rebuilding Liberty Without Permission," but as I would not be a slave to a Democrat nor a Republican, neither would I be a slave or master to Libertarians.

As to the cognitive elite, I fear they suffer from the same sort of dissonance. Yet I must admit that the increasing presumption that institutions of higher learning are to be profit centers lends emphasis to your (Murray's) argument as stated. I also agree that injustice system is lawless, but I also see inherent flaws in the rule of law. Yes, it is worse and growing more so, but it was seriously flawed before.

The drawbridges are going up and the moats are deeper and more deadly, and the government (or just about any other adolescent) is capable of taking any one or all of us out with a mouse-click.

Tw

Aug. 24, 2015

Twister: Cognitive dissonance: sigh. I once wrote a column on it for the Reader. It can be our enemy. Best, Don Bauder

Aug. 24, 2015

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