Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Escape from Texas

Southland Collie Rescue acquires 4 of 110 dogs rescued from terrible conditions

Kathlene Myron and Sheldin
Kathlene Myron and Sheldin

This past summer, in Tomball, TX, bankruptcy fillings for an optometrist, Dr. Elaine Kmiec, indicated she had a large number of collies on her acreage. She claimed to have only 35. Attorneys for Houston Collie Rescue petitioned the court to seize the dogs.

When the rescuers arrived on August 29, they found 110 collies (one with 13 new puppies) in deplorable conditions. It took the group nine and a half hours to round up all the roaming dogs.

Thanks to Houston Collie Rescue and their makeshift “Camp Collie,” and our local rescue group, Southland Collie Rescue (SCR), four of the collies may soon be available for adoption locally.

The SoCal-based SCR, a nonprofit organization, sent two volunteers to Houston to help. Mitch Telson and Shauna Hoffman knew they had foster homes locally for only four collies, as these dogs would be very different from a typical rescue from previous homes or shelters.

None of the dogs would be house-broken or fixed, most would have skin issues, some would have vision or eye problems, all would need to fattened up on special diets. And based on their living conditions, they were described as “snarky” temperament — short-tempered and snappy — unlike well-socialized collies.

The SCR’s only requirement is that the dogs be heartworm negative. Houston Collie Rescue chose which four collies would come to California, knowing they would have to travel for four days, stay in motels, and be able to be on a leash.

On September 24, the four dogs arrived at SCR’s Collie Haven in Riverside, where they were met by three of their four foster families. The fourth dog will be kept there temporarily, until she’s out of heat.

Kathlene Myron of Rancho Santa Fe is currently fostering Zeus, originally thought to be a two- to four-year-old. But the local vet, Dr. Gee, who performed the neutering last week, says he’s closer to five or six.

Now renamed Sheldin (name changes are common with rescue dogs), the dog was very skittish and roamed around barking when I arrived for a visit. Only after several minutes did Sheldin calm down and allow me to pet him. This is typical behavior for dogs rescued from horrible conditions. After finally accepting me, Sheldin then retreated, needing space and to be left alone for awhile. “He’s processing everything,” said Myron. Also typical behavior from a rescued dog.

Myron walks him three times a day to help build muscle strength. She feeds him small quantities, often, to allow him to get used to healthy food and good digestion.

“The first night, he slept right next to me,” said Myron. She learned that was a mistake, seeing the effects all over her bedroom of not being housebroken. Sheldin will need special training over the next several months.

The other three rescued dogs — Venus, Apollo, and Cupid — are being fostered elsewhere in SoCal.

Sue Baldwin, director for the SCR said, “We are in constant contact with the foster homes concerning their health issues. One has already been to emergency care. Stress seems to be the cause of most of their problems so far.

“Two of the four dogs will probably be adopted by the foster families. These dogs are unique and need appropriate dog-savvy collie owners. They are all wonderful dogs that just came from despicable conditions. Some are shut down: they have had to fight for food and space. They have not seen the world and are startled by sudden noises. We are going slowly with their socialization,” Baldwin added.

The Houston organization is trying to place as many dogs in the Texas area before seeking out-of-the-area rescue groups. SCR was welcomed because volunteer Telson had worked with them before, and they knew the dogs would be driven, not flown, to SoCal and well cared for. Houston Collie Rescue does not want the rescued dogs to fly for fear of possible death due to stress.

SCR is looking for donations to help cover the $4000 cost of bringing the four dogs west. Adoption information will posted on the group’s website in a few months — collie.org. The group’s San Diego volunteer, Linda Kratz, can be contacted at [email protected]

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

The optional surcharge of Trust Restaurant Group

A dollar oyster happy hour and four percent living wage fee
Next Article

Fabian Nunez fails to work magic for Mercury lobbying firm

Santee's Mayor Minto can't write his column
Kathlene Myron and Sheldin
Kathlene Myron and Sheldin

This past summer, in Tomball, TX, bankruptcy fillings for an optometrist, Dr. Elaine Kmiec, indicated she had a large number of collies on her acreage. She claimed to have only 35. Attorneys for Houston Collie Rescue petitioned the court to seize the dogs.

When the rescuers arrived on August 29, they found 110 collies (one with 13 new puppies) in deplorable conditions. It took the group nine and a half hours to round up all the roaming dogs.

Thanks to Houston Collie Rescue and their makeshift “Camp Collie,” and our local rescue group, Southland Collie Rescue (SCR), four of the collies may soon be available for adoption locally.

The SoCal-based SCR, a nonprofit organization, sent two volunteers to Houston to help. Mitch Telson and Shauna Hoffman knew they had foster homes locally for only four collies, as these dogs would be very different from a typical rescue from previous homes or shelters.

None of the dogs would be house-broken or fixed, most would have skin issues, some would have vision or eye problems, all would need to fattened up on special diets. And based on their living conditions, they were described as “snarky” temperament — short-tempered and snappy — unlike well-socialized collies.

The SCR’s only requirement is that the dogs be heartworm negative. Houston Collie Rescue chose which four collies would come to California, knowing they would have to travel for four days, stay in motels, and be able to be on a leash.

On September 24, the four dogs arrived at SCR’s Collie Haven in Riverside, where they were met by three of their four foster families. The fourth dog will be kept there temporarily, until she’s out of heat.

Kathlene Myron of Rancho Santa Fe is currently fostering Zeus, originally thought to be a two- to four-year-old. But the local vet, Dr. Gee, who performed the neutering last week, says he’s closer to five or six.

Now renamed Sheldin (name changes are common with rescue dogs), the dog was very skittish and roamed around barking when I arrived for a visit. Only after several minutes did Sheldin calm down and allow me to pet him. This is typical behavior for dogs rescued from horrible conditions. After finally accepting me, Sheldin then retreated, needing space and to be left alone for awhile. “He’s processing everything,” said Myron. Also typical behavior from a rescued dog.

Myron walks him three times a day to help build muscle strength. She feeds him small quantities, often, to allow him to get used to healthy food and good digestion.

“The first night, he slept right next to me,” said Myron. She learned that was a mistake, seeing the effects all over her bedroom of not being housebroken. Sheldin will need special training over the next several months.

The other three rescued dogs — Venus, Apollo, and Cupid — are being fostered elsewhere in SoCal.

Sue Baldwin, director for the SCR said, “We are in constant contact with the foster homes concerning their health issues. One has already been to emergency care. Stress seems to be the cause of most of their problems so far.

“Two of the four dogs will probably be adopted by the foster families. These dogs are unique and need appropriate dog-savvy collie owners. They are all wonderful dogs that just came from despicable conditions. Some are shut down: they have had to fight for food and space. They have not seen the world and are startled by sudden noises. We are going slowly with their socialization,” Baldwin added.

The Houston organization is trying to place as many dogs in the Texas area before seeking out-of-the-area rescue groups. SCR was welcomed because volunteer Telson had worked with them before, and they knew the dogs would be driven, not flown, to SoCal and well cared for. Houston Collie Rescue does not want the rescued dogs to fly for fear of possible death due to stress.

SCR is looking for donations to help cover the $4000 cost of bringing the four dogs west. Adoption information will posted on the group’s website in a few months — collie.org. The group’s San Diego volunteer, Linda Kratz, can be contacted at [email protected]

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Forget bike lanes or sidewalks in rural San Diego County

Supervisors steer around anti-car measure
Next Article

Statues stored for sake of safety (and sanity)

Monu-mental
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close