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Wallethub.com, a firm that calculates statistics on metro areas based on complex formulas, says San Diego is no ideal retirement haven.

Criteria were such factors as weather, affordability, senior centers per capita, fishing and recreation facilities, percent of population above 65, and the like.

San Diego came in 108th of 150 metro areas. Obviously affordability and job availability hurt San Diego — too much to be offset by the good weather. The top location was Tampa. The bottom two were Newark, New Jersey, and Providence, Rhode Island.

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Comments

Visduh Sept. 5, 2014 @ 8:52 a.m.

Gee, do I have to leave? I rather like it here. Despite the poor showing, many, many rich folks flock to San Diego in retirement. I think retirement income levels have a great deal to do with its attractiveness, or lack of it.

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Don Bauder Sept. 5, 2014 @ 11:25 a.m.

Visduh: No, you don't have to leave. You have been in San Diego County a long time. Your home is probably paid for, so the cost-of-living is not biting you as much as it is hitting new retirees moving in.

You are correct: a lot of very rich people retire to San Diego County. Those people can ignore this survey, because they have no problem with affordability.

When I moved to San Diego in 1973, it was a haven for military retirees -- of both high and low rank. I doubt if it is now, but that is a very interesting topic. Best, Don Bauder

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danfogel Sept. 5, 2014 @ 11:41 a.m.

Not to offend anyone living in or moving to San Diego, but I have a different point of view. I lived there for almost 20 yrs, from a teenager until I was almost 40. When I came back down south about 11/2 yrs go, I was going to move to San Diego. And after a few visits, I decided not to. I can pretty much live wherever I choose, and I chose not to live in San Diego, for many of the reasons to are talked about in the reader every day.

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Don Bauder Sept. 5, 2014 @ 12:35 p.m.

danfogel: San Diego became too attractive. In the 1980s, the population grew about 3 percent a year. That's too much. Now it's down to around one percent, probably less, but the damage has been done. An expressway with 18 lanes tells it all. (Is it 18 lanes? Or is it more?)

The cost-of-living is quite high, except for those who have been in the county for a very long time, perhaps owning a Prop. 13 home. Incomes are moderate.

The infrastructure and neighborhoods are shot, but the political clout lies with business and construction/leisure labor unions, which want the money steered to useless projects. A long drought threatens but there will be inadequate money for combatting it because the money goes to the corporate welfare crowd, which wants a convention center expansion and a subsidized football stadium.

Yes, San Diego has problems that, it appears, cannot be solved democratically. Best, Don Bauder

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danfogel Sept. 5, 2014 @ 1:03 p.m.

don bauder, as I said, it had nothing to do with being too expensive. For me. it was strictly quality of life, which does encompass the things you mentioned, infrastructure issues, overcrowding, politics to name a few. Thanks but no thanks.

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Don Bauder Sept. 5, 2014 @ 1:11 p.m.

danfogel: Inadequate infrastructure, overcrowding, corrupt politics are all good reasons to prefer living elsewhere. Best, Don Bauder

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danfogel Sept. 5, 2014 @ 2:04 p.m.

Yes, they are. I ended up in a beautiful little Spanish village by the sea that catches good swells pretty much all year long and has been home to porn stars, Playmates, athletes, actors and a President, among others.

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Don Bauder Sept. 5, 2014 @ 5:39 p.m.

Visduh; I suspect danfogel does live in Orange County somewhere near San Clemente. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Sept. 6, 2014 @ 8:08 a.m.

danfogel: FYI for the others: Ole Hanson was a politically conservative former mayor of Seattle who founded San Clemente. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Sept. 5, 2014 @ 5:38 p.m.

danfogel: If you live where I think you live, I suspect the president was Nixon. Who were the porn stars and Playmates? Did Nixon ogle them? Best, Don Bauder

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danfogel Sept. 6, 2014 @ 1:36 a.m.

Don Bauder, I would have no idea whom Nixon ogled, or if he ogled at all. If I remember correctly, and I almost always do, Nixon moved back to Manhattan while I was still in college in the late 1970's. I don't remember when they finally sold it, but it has to be something like 25-30 yrs ago. There is a very good Mexican restaurant In Dana Point that Nixon used to frequent. It's called Olamendi's, on PCH right across from Capo Beach. Pretty good food. Lots of Nixon pictures on the wall. We used to take our daughter their with us when she was little. After dinner we would take the bridge across PCH and let her run around and burn off all that excess energy she had from having to sit still during dinner.

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Don Bauder Sept. 6, 2014 @ 8:14 a.m.

danfogel: My parents retired to Laguna Hills in 1965 and we spent time in some of the places you mention. Our children liked Orange County, although they liked San Diego better. As my mother aged, I would go up there every three weeks or so to help her with various things. At that time, traffic was worse in Orange County than in San Diego. My guess is it still it. Best, Don Bauder

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danfogel Sept. 6, 2014 @ 9 a.m.

Were they in the place formerly known as Leisure World?? Yeah, traffic is pretty much the same now. We used to up there a lot, or at least thru OC on the way to LA. One particular trip will always stick out. It was the summer of 1981. For some reason we were going up to Fullerton, so we left La Jolla at about 4pm on a Sunday. This was before a widening project on I-5 from the OC line north, which started in 1982 or 1983. Traffic was slow leaving town, but typical for a Sunday with everyone headed back from SD and points south. But before we even got to O'side, everything came to a grinding halt. We finally arrived in Fullerton at 8:30 that night. It took 41/2 hrs for a drive we could normally do in just over 1/3 that time. When we moved away from SD, in 1994, we were then heading to south OC from Calabasas. Usually, we came down on Friday evenings. By then, they were in the middle of the "Y" widening project, which was better when it was done, but was a bitch while they were doing it. When I'm over in Arizona and people their complain about the traffic, I just laugh and tell them they don't have a clue, that if they want to see real traffic, try spending some quality time with their car anyplace in So Cal or Seattle. And then come talk to me about traffic in Tucson. LOL

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Don Bauder Sept. 6, 2014 @ 10:29 a.m.

danfogel: Yes, my parents were in Leisure World. I didn't know it had changed its name. My family and I spent a lot of time there. Best, Don Bauder

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JustWondering Sept. 5, 2014 @ 12:40 p.m.

As a 2nd generation native, who is semi retired I would have a difficult time being comfortable anywhere else. So it seems I'll have to endure San Diego's less desirable attributes, such as the high cost of living, while enjoying some of the best year round weather. I have adapted to most of the negatives and would miss all the positives. Tell me Don why did you flee San Diego for life in Colorado for your golden years?

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Don Bauder Sept. 5, 2014 @ 12:59 p.m.

JustWondering: We didn't move to get lower taxes, although we got them. We wanted more room; we have 36 acres, surrounded on three sides by 14,000-foot peaks and the fourth side by 12,000 footers. We are in the middle of the Rockies. We wanted four seasons instead of two. (We are both from Chicago suburbs and knew all about winter, even though we had lived in San Diego 30 years.)

We wanted a small town with culture. Our county, which is about 18,000, has 14 top-rate chamber music concerts a year -- six by Aspen Music Festival and School faculty members, 4 by a group of retired Dallas Symphony players, and four by members of the Colorado Symphony. I doubt if any small market in the U.S. can say that. We also go to Denver, Santa Fe, and Central City for opera.

We had lived in big metro areas all our lives -- Chicago, Cleveland, San Diego -- and wanted to live in the country near small towns and have a lot of culture. We were able to find what we wanted. Best, Don Bauder

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AlexClarke Sept. 7, 2014 @ 8:40 a.m.

The reason for prop 13 was that the property values were rising so fast that those who had purchased a home when prices were low were being taxed at the appraised rate and many, especially retired and fixed income, people were being taxed out of their homes. As I understand it all houses are under prop 13. If you buy a home at say $70k (a long time ago) you are taxed at that rate with a cap of 2% increase each year. When the home is sold, say for a price of $325k it is then taxed based on that amount. The vast majority of property has been sold over and over again so there are few who are enjoying a really low tax base. I have retired and I planned to retire in San Diego so I purchased a home that I could pay off and live mortgage free. Now that my retirement income is fixed I am enjoying the tax benefits of having a low tax base. To force someone out of their home based on inflated prices and taxes is immoral.

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Don Bauder Sept. 7, 2014 @ 12:21 p.m.

AlexClarke: I remember that back when Prop. 13 passed, I was in favor of it. Property taxes had become ridiculously high for some households. After the inevitable declines in public services came, I wasn't so sure. I don't know whether you can say that the vast majority of Prop. 13 homes have been sold. Obviously, a lot of the Prop. 13 homes have not been sold, or have been modified in a way that keeps them under the Prop. 13 threshold, but I don't know the percentage. It would be interesting to find out. Best, Don Bauder

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JustWondering Sept. 8, 2014 @ 4:47 p.m.

Businesses benefited from prop 13 too. In fact much more than homeowners ever did. This is the flaw of 13 and still is a mistake that needs to be remedied. For example, the largest real estate holder in SD County is SDGE. Its shareholder are the ones benefiting from the Prop 13 assessments. Since SDGE always "owns" the property it will never be reassessed like a change in home ownership. SDGE is just one example ...think of all the other business who own property that will never be reassessed because ownership doesn't change hands.

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Don Bauder Sept. 8, 2014 @ 9:09 p.m.

JustWondering: Businesses are less likely to switch locations within San Diego or within California. Some do grow and need larger quarters. Best, Don Bauder

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