Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

You’re on notice, SDG&E

Death blow to community-choice energy option averted

Dozens of residents from across San Diego County gathered inside city hall in Solana Beach on Monday evening, October 13. They were there for a presentation by local clean-energy activist Lane Sharman concerning a push to establish "community choice aggregation (CCA)", a method of sourcing cheaper, greener electricity than that currently provided by local energy monopoly San Diego Gas & Electric.

The San Diego Energy District, of which Sharman is a founding member, has been exploring the CCA model locally since 2005. He envisions possibly having a functional system in place locally as early as 2015.

Sharman called a switch to clean power "the biggest change you'll never notice," emphasizing the importance of consumers remaining "on the grid" and within the jurisdiction of SDG&E as an electricity supplier.

"Exiting the grid turns out to be a very unfortunate phenomenon because it eliminates a lot of potential storage capacity," said Sharman. "It's kind of like you plugging into the internet, but the internet's closed off, because someone has cut off your connection…. So, we want to avoid what we call 'grid defection,' which has been on the minds of more and more people as they're forced to pay more for their power."

Similar community-choice operations are already active in two Northern California locales; in both cases they've been able to increase local energy portfolios to include 50 percent energy consumption from green sources while reducing the electric bills of Pacific Gas & Electric customers. Debate exists as to whether such figures are simply "green-washing”; however, the total energy mix is calculated including credits purchased from out-of-area generators such as wind farms in the Midwest, even though that energy is not actually being consumed by the CCA district.

Community choice is also designed to be set up as a nonprofit operation — Sharman noted that Marin Clean Energy, a CCA district established along the coast north of San Francisco, had established a $7 million surplus in a three-year period through 2013 by collecting approximately $50 annually per customer above the cost of actual energy purchases.

"SDG&E is a stellar company at producing bottom-line profits," said Sharman, noting that in the same 3-year period the company generated more than $1.3 billion in profits for shareholders by charging ratepayers an average $940 more than the cost of power delivered.

The push to expand community choice in several other districts statewide avoided a setback when state Assembly Bill 2145 died in the senate over the summer. If passed, the bill — supported by all of the state's energy monopolies including SDG&E — would have prevented community-choice districts from automatically enrolling customers instead forcing them to "opt in" to the program, despite participation offering a benefit to consumers. Community-choice advocates argued the utility-backed bill would have killed any future programs, as the extensive investment necessary to establish a new district wouldn't be possible without a guaranteed client base to entice energy suppliers to negotiate power purchase agreements.

"We fully support customer choice, and we'll cooperate with any aggregating authority that's formed," said SDG&E spokesman Warren Ruis, one of a handful of the utility's employees attending the meeting.

"We disagree," was the only response offered to an audience member who questioned the prior statement, suggesting a conflict between the alleged support and the utility's support of AB 2145, universally termed a death blow for community choice by the program's supporters.

If community choice is implemented, in 2015 or beyond, consumers will have several opportunities to opt out of the program and continue receiving an energy blend as selected by SDG&E. The utility noted that it expects to source 33 percent of its energy from renewable sources by year end, an accomplishment that would be six years ahead of state mandates for green energy conversion.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Oktoberfest beers to drink at home

Pick up a stein, or have this year’s märzen delivered
Next Article

San Diego watersheds trashed by street sweeping negligence

"Many routes with high debris are designated as low priority," audit finds

Dozens of residents from across San Diego County gathered inside city hall in Solana Beach on Monday evening, October 13. They were there for a presentation by local clean-energy activist Lane Sharman concerning a push to establish "community choice aggregation (CCA)", a method of sourcing cheaper, greener electricity than that currently provided by local energy monopoly San Diego Gas & Electric.

The San Diego Energy District, of which Sharman is a founding member, has been exploring the CCA model locally since 2005. He envisions possibly having a functional system in place locally as early as 2015.

Sharman called a switch to clean power "the biggest change you'll never notice," emphasizing the importance of consumers remaining "on the grid" and within the jurisdiction of SDG&E as an electricity supplier.

"Exiting the grid turns out to be a very unfortunate phenomenon because it eliminates a lot of potential storage capacity," said Sharman. "It's kind of like you plugging into the internet, but the internet's closed off, because someone has cut off your connection…. So, we want to avoid what we call 'grid defection,' which has been on the minds of more and more people as they're forced to pay more for their power."

Similar community-choice operations are already active in two Northern California locales; in both cases they've been able to increase local energy portfolios to include 50 percent energy consumption from green sources while reducing the electric bills of Pacific Gas & Electric customers. Debate exists as to whether such figures are simply "green-washing”; however, the total energy mix is calculated including credits purchased from out-of-area generators such as wind farms in the Midwest, even though that energy is not actually being consumed by the CCA district.

Community choice is also designed to be set up as a nonprofit operation — Sharman noted that Marin Clean Energy, a CCA district established along the coast north of San Francisco, had established a $7 million surplus in a three-year period through 2013 by collecting approximately $50 annually per customer above the cost of actual energy purchases.

"SDG&E is a stellar company at producing bottom-line profits," said Sharman, noting that in the same 3-year period the company generated more than $1.3 billion in profits for shareholders by charging ratepayers an average $940 more than the cost of power delivered.

The push to expand community choice in several other districts statewide avoided a setback when state Assembly Bill 2145 died in the senate over the summer. If passed, the bill — supported by all of the state's energy monopolies including SDG&E — would have prevented community-choice districts from automatically enrolling customers instead forcing them to "opt in" to the program, despite participation offering a benefit to consumers. Community-choice advocates argued the utility-backed bill would have killed any future programs, as the extensive investment necessary to establish a new district wouldn't be possible without a guaranteed client base to entice energy suppliers to negotiate power purchase agreements.

"We fully support customer choice, and we'll cooperate with any aggregating authority that's formed," said SDG&E spokesman Warren Ruis, one of a handful of the utility's employees attending the meeting.

"We disagree," was the only response offered to an audience member who questioned the prior statement, suggesting a conflict between the alleged support and the utility's support of AB 2145, universally termed a death blow for community choice by the program's supporters.

If community choice is implemented, in 2015 or beyond, consumers will have several opportunities to opt out of the program and continue receiving an energy blend as selected by SDG&E. The utility noted that it expects to source 33 percent of its energy from renewable sources by year end, an accomplishment that would be six years ahead of state mandates for green energy conversion.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Oktoberfest beers to drink at home

Pick up a stein, or have this year’s märzen delivered
Next Article

Barbara Bry was right about motorized scooters

Todd Gloria was not
Comments
3

All utilities should be ratepayer owned. For instance the eastern end of the Coachella Valley (La Quinta, Indio, Thermal, Mecca, etc) gets power from IID (Imperial Irrigation District).There are no tiered rates and the single rate is 40% lower than Edison. Edison is investor owned and is run, like SDG&E, for the profit of the shareholders. IID is ratepayer owned and is run for the benefit of the ratepayers.

Oct. 14, 2014

Ratepayer flight (away for Utilities) is now the biggest concern for local BIG Utilities, that is except for the San Onofre failed replacement steam generator debacle that might very well cost them 3+ Billion Dollars.

TIP: Unlike shareholder Utilities, putting Solar panels on your roof will never rip you off or ask the CPUC to continually keep raising your energy bill!

Oct. 15, 2014

captd/founder, Have you installed solar yet??

Oct. 15, 2014

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close