Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Traded my suit for Levis

Jeff Sanchez of Solana Beach was an investment banker for 12 years until the economy tanked and he lost his job. To ease the stress he began fixing items in his house such as repairing his deck, painting the kitchen and remodeling his bathroom. While never a fix-it type of guy, his father had taught him the fundamentals and passed down his tool chest. Soon Sanchez was taking classes at Home Depot and watching DIY videos online. It took two years of unemployment to realize he could turn his skills into a job as a handy man.

“I traded my suits for Levis and my laptop for a Skil saw,” Sanchez said. “I traded in two cars for a truck, took an online contractor’s license course and was on my way to a new life.”

Angie’s List —a web-based paid site which advertises local services such as plumbers and electricians — states that the hourly rate for a handy man is $60 to $85, plus a fee for mileage.

“I choose my hours, and I make a pretty great salary minus the crazy stress,” Sanchez said. “ It doesn’t sound as fancy as a banker, but it’s a hell of a lot more fun.”

Not everyone has the skill set to fix light sockets, replace gutters or repair electric garage doors, but that’s exactly why the job of handy man is appealing to many people. Harvard University’s Joint Center for Housing Studies predicts spending on remodeling projects will jump 9.2 percent to $125.1 billion.

Jessica Lancaster of Orange County is an apprentice electrician and is taking classes in carpentry at El Camino College and plans to become a professional handy woman sometime in 2015.

“I think other women would like to have women come into their home to fix their toilet or sink instead of a guy,” she said. “I think it’s safer and way cooler to say a girl just fixed the garbage disposal.”

Owning your own handy man business is pretty much the same as owning any other business. You need to keep up on what your city or county requires for a business license and you better find out if you need to be bonded or if you need a contractor’s license. Not every city is the same.

You will not only be responsible for the nails and screws, but you will need to be able to estimate the costs of the project costs, write the contract, and collect money when the job is completed.

“I’m a one-man operation,” Sanchez said. “I can’t fix everything, and if that’s the case I recommend some of my friends who are expert plumbers and electricians to come in.”

Getting the word out about your handy man business can be as easy as taking out an ad in a newspaper or getting the word out on social media. If someone likes what you do, make sure they give you great referrals on Yelp and Angie’s List, or you can work with realtors.

As a Jack-of-all-trades you’ll have to be in decent shape and able to lift, not fall off a ladder and be on your knees for hours on end.

If you don’t know a hammer from pliers, but something calls to you to help others screw in a light bulb, you might want to check out the Mr. Handyman franchise where you hire others to fix the broken stuff while you sit in your office making appointments and counting the money.

According to their site, Mr. Handyman is owned by Service Brands International (SBI), which has been franchising since 1984. Service Brands is a multi-concept franchise system that has about 25 years of experience in the franchise world. Start-up cost: $40,000 to $54,400 and the total investment in this franchise is $91,200 to $132,300.

But if you are like Sanchez and Lancaster, you feel good about helping other people and enjoy the satisfaction of a job well-done.

“It sounds crazy, but I like reaching into a garbage disposal to pull out some kids Legos,” Sanchez said. “Mom is happy, the kid is happy and I fixed something with my hands and got paid for it. Hell of a lot better than making other people richer.”

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Shawn Mitchell: moved by a Youth for Christ group singing at the Civic Theater

“That night I made a decision to follow Jesus”
Next Article

Angry Pete's Pizza brings Detroit to Kensington

Thick crust and caramelized cheese will make you forget about round pies

Jeff Sanchez of Solana Beach was an investment banker for 12 years until the economy tanked and he lost his job. To ease the stress he began fixing items in his house such as repairing his deck, painting the kitchen and remodeling his bathroom. While never a fix-it type of guy, his father had taught him the fundamentals and passed down his tool chest. Soon Sanchez was taking classes at Home Depot and watching DIY videos online. It took two years of unemployment to realize he could turn his skills into a job as a handy man.

“I traded my suits for Levis and my laptop for a Skil saw,” Sanchez said. “I traded in two cars for a truck, took an online contractor’s license course and was on my way to a new life.”

Angie’s List —a web-based paid site which advertises local services such as plumbers and electricians — states that the hourly rate for a handy man is $60 to $85, plus a fee for mileage.

“I choose my hours, and I make a pretty great salary minus the crazy stress,” Sanchez said. “ It doesn’t sound as fancy as a banker, but it’s a hell of a lot more fun.”

Not everyone has the skill set to fix light sockets, replace gutters or repair electric garage doors, but that’s exactly why the job of handy man is appealing to many people. Harvard University’s Joint Center for Housing Studies predicts spending on remodeling projects will jump 9.2 percent to $125.1 billion.

Jessica Lancaster of Orange County is an apprentice electrician and is taking classes in carpentry at El Camino College and plans to become a professional handy woman sometime in 2015.

“I think other women would like to have women come into their home to fix their toilet or sink instead of a guy,” she said. “I think it’s safer and way cooler to say a girl just fixed the garbage disposal.”

Owning your own handy man business is pretty much the same as owning any other business. You need to keep up on what your city or county requires for a business license and you better find out if you need to be bonded or if you need a contractor’s license. Not every city is the same.

You will not only be responsible for the nails and screws, but you will need to be able to estimate the costs of the project costs, write the contract, and collect money when the job is completed.

“I’m a one-man operation,” Sanchez said. “I can’t fix everything, and if that’s the case I recommend some of my friends who are expert plumbers and electricians to come in.”

Getting the word out about your handy man business can be as easy as taking out an ad in a newspaper or getting the word out on social media. If someone likes what you do, make sure they give you great referrals on Yelp and Angie’s List, or you can work with realtors.

As a Jack-of-all-trades you’ll have to be in decent shape and able to lift, not fall off a ladder and be on your knees for hours on end.

If you don’t know a hammer from pliers, but something calls to you to help others screw in a light bulb, you might want to check out the Mr. Handyman franchise where you hire others to fix the broken stuff while you sit in your office making appointments and counting the money.

According to their site, Mr. Handyman is owned by Service Brands International (SBI), which has been franchising since 1984. Service Brands is a multi-concept franchise system that has about 25 years of experience in the franchise world. Start-up cost: $40,000 to $54,400 and the total investment in this franchise is $91,200 to $132,300.

But if you are like Sanchez and Lancaster, you feel good about helping other people and enjoy the satisfaction of a job well-done.

“It sounds crazy, but I like reaching into a garbage disposal to pull out some kids Legos,” Sanchez said. “Mom is happy, the kid is happy and I fixed something with my hands and got paid for it. Hell of a lot better than making other people richer.”

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Pepper covers Sublime for The House That Bradley Built comp

Hirie, G. Love, the Expanders, Common Kings, the Skints, Long Beach Dub Allstars, and Trevor Young also contribute
Next Article

Morgan Freeman as an extraterrestrial diplomat

You know the aliens have seen The Shawshank Redemption
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close