4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Caesar Salad turns 90?

Legend says the famous salad was created July 4, 1924

Caesar Salad at Sheerwater restaurant at the Hotel Del Coronado
Caesar Salad at Sheerwater restaurant at the Hotel Del Coronado
Place

Caesar’s Restaurante Bar

Avenida Revolución 1059, Tijuana, BC

Place

Casa Guadalajara

4105 Taylor Street, San Diego

Place

Saltbox

1047 Fifth Avenue, San Diego

Place

Hotel del Coronado

1500 Orange Avenue, Coronado

July 4 not only marks America’s 238th birthday, but, if the legend is correct, it’s also the 90th anniversary of what is arguably the region’s greatest contribution to culinary culture: The Caesar Salad.

“I think people don’t realize where it came from because it’s been around for so long,” says Jeremiah Bryant, Chef de Cuisine at Saltbox. “It’s simple and delicious when executed well. It’s the best example of a chef doing what chefs often have to do: they take a look at what is available to them and try to make the best dishes possible using those ingredients.”

Most sources credit the salad’s creation to Caesar Cardini, an Italian chef who ran Caesar’s Restaurant in Tijuana during prohibition.

His daughter Rosa once claimed her dad created the salad during a busy July 4th weekend in 1924 when a run on the kitchen left him short of food supplies.

Casa Guadalajara in Old Town decorates its Caesar with avocado slices and quesadilla triangles.

Working with what he had — romaine lettuce, croutons from a baguette, a few eggs, garlic, worcestershire sauce, and parmesan cheese — Cardini, the story goes, improvised a salad that has since become what might be called the Elvis Presley of salads.

To make a simple dish improvised at the last minute seem bigger than it was, Cardini, the story goes, made the Caesar at tableside.

“It’s an amazing dish that can cross boundaries,” says Donald Lockhart, executive chef of Cusp Dining & Drinks in La Jolla. “The thing about the Caesar is that everyone interprets it differently, but it’s a story that keeps being told, which shows what a great dish this salad actually is.”

The Hotel Caesar on Avenida Revolucion is genuinely accepted as the birthplace of the salad, and it celebrated the salad with a street festival this past weekend.

It should be noted that Cardini’s claim to the Caesar’s creation is controversial in some circles.

Some of his co-workers say they created the salad. Also, Cardini’s brother, Alex, created the Aviator’s Salad, which is similar to the Caesar, but adds a smear of anchovy paste to the crouton.

Cardini reportedly did not like anchovies in his Caesar, but some chefs like Keith Lord of the Wild Thyme Company feel they are crucial to the dish.

“A Caesar doesn’t always have to be traditional, but the egg yolk and anchovies are essential, he says. “The yolk gives the dish a rich creaminess, and the anchovies add saltiness but also depth of flavor. The two give it so much richness and dimension that cannot be replicated using substitutions. Without them, it wouldn’t be a Caesar.”

Because raw eggs can carry salmonella bacteria, some places try to use bottled Caesar-style restaurant instead. To chefs like Tim Kolanko, Executive Chef of Coronado-based Blue Bridge Hospitality, that’s an affront to the salad.

“It's not a Caesar,” he insists. “You should just call it something else.”

The salad’s deliciousness is not up for debate, but whether it’s Mexican food or Italian can make for heated discussions.

Some foodies like Steve Schackne, the food and beverage director at Hotel del Coronado, believe country of origin should dictate which cuisine gets the credit.

“All the information I have credits Alex and Caesar Cardini for this salad at the Caesar hotel,” he says. “I have to go with Mexican on this one.”

Kolanko disagrees: “The soul of the dish is totally Italian, it just happened to be created in Mexico.”

Meanwhile, Jose Duran, the Executive Chef at Casa Guadalajara in Old Town, believes the dish is big enough for everyone.

“It’s international,” he says. “Like me, born and bred in Tijuana, but made successful in the United States.”

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Getting deep at The Shop: Pizza + Cocktails

“West coast deep-dish” means chunky tomatoes and cornmeal crunch in Rancho Bernardo
Next Article

Be habitual, baby!

Timing is the toughest surf skill to master
Caesar Salad at Sheerwater restaurant at the Hotel Del Coronado
Caesar Salad at Sheerwater restaurant at the Hotel Del Coronado
Place

Caesar’s Restaurante Bar

Avenida Revolución 1059, Tijuana, BC

Place

Casa Guadalajara

4105 Taylor Street, San Diego

Place

Saltbox

1047 Fifth Avenue, San Diego

Place

Hotel del Coronado

1500 Orange Avenue, Coronado

July 4 not only marks America’s 238th birthday, but, if the legend is correct, it’s also the 90th anniversary of what is arguably the region’s greatest contribution to culinary culture: The Caesar Salad.

“I think people don’t realize where it came from because it’s been around for so long,” says Jeremiah Bryant, Chef de Cuisine at Saltbox. “It’s simple and delicious when executed well. It’s the best example of a chef doing what chefs often have to do: they take a look at what is available to them and try to make the best dishes possible using those ingredients.”

Most sources credit the salad’s creation to Caesar Cardini, an Italian chef who ran Caesar’s Restaurant in Tijuana during prohibition.

His daughter Rosa once claimed her dad created the salad during a busy July 4th weekend in 1924 when a run on the kitchen left him short of food supplies.

Casa Guadalajara in Old Town decorates its Caesar with avocado slices and quesadilla triangles.

Working with what he had — romaine lettuce, croutons from a baguette, a few eggs, garlic, worcestershire sauce, and parmesan cheese — Cardini, the story goes, improvised a salad that has since become what might be called the Elvis Presley of salads.

To make a simple dish improvised at the last minute seem bigger than it was, Cardini, the story goes, made the Caesar at tableside.

“It’s an amazing dish that can cross boundaries,” says Donald Lockhart, executive chef of Cusp Dining & Drinks in La Jolla. “The thing about the Caesar is that everyone interprets it differently, but it’s a story that keeps being told, which shows what a great dish this salad actually is.”

The Hotel Caesar on Avenida Revolucion is genuinely accepted as the birthplace of the salad, and it celebrated the salad with a street festival this past weekend.

It should be noted that Cardini’s claim to the Caesar’s creation is controversial in some circles.

Some of his co-workers say they created the salad. Also, Cardini’s brother, Alex, created the Aviator’s Salad, which is similar to the Caesar, but adds a smear of anchovy paste to the crouton.

Cardini reportedly did not like anchovies in his Caesar, but some chefs like Keith Lord of the Wild Thyme Company feel they are crucial to the dish.

“A Caesar doesn’t always have to be traditional, but the egg yolk and anchovies are essential, he says. “The yolk gives the dish a rich creaminess, and the anchovies add saltiness but also depth of flavor. The two give it so much richness and dimension that cannot be replicated using substitutions. Without them, it wouldn’t be a Caesar.”

Because raw eggs can carry salmonella bacteria, some places try to use bottled Caesar-style restaurant instead. To chefs like Tim Kolanko, Executive Chef of Coronado-based Blue Bridge Hospitality, that’s an affront to the salad.

“It's not a Caesar,” he insists. “You should just call it something else.”

The salad’s deliciousness is not up for debate, but whether it’s Mexican food or Italian can make for heated discussions.

Some foodies like Steve Schackne, the food and beverage director at Hotel del Coronado, believe country of origin should dictate which cuisine gets the credit.

“All the information I have credits Alex and Caesar Cardini for this salad at the Caesar hotel,” he says. “I have to go with Mexican on this one.”

Kolanko disagrees: “The soul of the dish is totally Italian, it just happened to be created in Mexico.”

Meanwhile, Jose Duran, the Executive Chef at Casa Guadalajara in Old Town, believes the dish is big enough for everyone.

“It’s international,” he says. “Like me, born and bred in Tijuana, but made successful in the United States.”

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Paul Verlaine: an Arthur Rimbaud love quarrel

He was also a prominent member of two late-19th-century literary movements
Next Article

San Diego 5th in immigrants who walk away

Toni Atkins builds up pro-abortion war chest
Comments
1

Anywhere I can find a recipe for the "original" Caesar salad? If you tell a story long enough it become true history. But I believe this is where the salad started and the story is a true as we will ever find out. At least the salad's beginnings weren't seised by corporate interests like the fake Betty Crocker and Aunt Jemima, like Hidden Valley Ranch Dressing or McDonalds were. Ranch dressing started right here in Escondido at Hidden Valley retreat near Lake Wolford. No credit is given its beginnings. And McDonalds wasn't started by Ray Kroc, as one could read about . . .

http://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/2014/jun/05/stringers-old-mcdonalds-had-some-history/

July 10, 2014

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories Fishing Report — What’s getting hooked from ship and shore From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town The Gonzo Report — Making the musical scene, or at least reporting from it Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Theater — On stage in San Diego this week Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close