Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Kevin Burdette: Feel the love

The conclusion of our interview with opera singer Kevin Burdette

Caricature of Kevin Burnette as Dulcamara by Joseph Sanabria.
Caricature of Kevin Burnette as Dulcamara by Joseph Sanabria.
Past Event

San Diego Opera: The Elixir of Love

...Continuing with our interview of opera singer Kevin Burdette.

San Diego Reader: Are you married?

Kevin Burdette: I am. I met my wife while working at a law firm in New York — well, wait. I’ll tell you a little about my background. In undergrad I was pre-law all the way. I spent a year abroad after my junior year and I went to Vienna, Austria. I’d always done music on the side, sort of avocationally, but in Vienna music is the lifeblood of the city. I went to the Vienna State Opera every week and got standing room tickets which were three bucks at the time. I realized that music doesn’t have to be an avocation, if it’s what your passion is, it can by your vocation. When I got back for my senior year I decided to apply to law school and to graduate school for music. Law school deferred and grad school didn’t. So I went to grad school at Juilliard in New York and then was accepted into the young artist’s program in Paris and kept deferring law school. Then I got my debut at New York City Opera which is where I cut my teeth. I ended up deferring law school at Columbia for six years. After six years I believe I was focusing on the negative aspects of a singing career, which are manifold. You know, you’re on the road and you don’t get rich doing it and it’s a hard time having a social life. As in any career there are negative aspects of it and I was focusing on them. I thought perhaps I was so negative on singing because law school was still out there. I went to law school and I was in New York so I was able to sing and be in law school. I graduated in 2007 and went to work in commercial real estate for a big New York law firm. You don’t sing and work for a law firm in New York. I would take vacation time to sing but there was no taking four weeks off to go sing Donizetti in San Diego. After about two years I got a couple offers to sing. One was to sing Mozart in Buenos Aires at the Teatro Colon and the other was to make my Met Debut in Strauss’ Elektra. I got a leave of absence from the firm, went to Buenos Aires and then while I was at the Met I thought, “Oh yeah, this is a lot more fun.” So, in 2010, I came crawling back to opera.

SDR: Do you also paint and write poetry or something?

KB: [laughing] NO, but that’s where I met my wife. She was a lawyer at the law firm.

SDR: So you still get to talk law?

KB: Oh yes, it’s fascinating...at least to lawyers.

SDR: Besides opera, what do you listen to?

KB: 80’s pop such as The Cars, The Violent Femmes, Psychedelic Furs, you know, stuff like that.

SDR: I lean toward the 80s as well. I’ve made a serious effort to engage with current pop music but I just don’t find much that resonates with me.

KB: I’m with you. I have a niece who is 23 and she’ll send me a newer pop song that she’ll think I like, based on my tastes. I like some of it, I get the grove but I don’t get hooked.

SDR: Do you listen to symphonic music?

KB: I do listen to symphonic music. That was my introduction to classical music. I grew up in Knoxville and went to the monthly concerts by the Knoxville symphony. I really got into it. I got into the DG recordings with von Karajan and Berlin. I still listen to his cycle of Beethoven Symphonies from the 1960s. I’m into the Strauss tone poems. I heard the Cleveland Symphony play and Carnegie Hall a couple of years ago. They did a Viennese and German concert and Franz Welser-Möst was conducting. He’s Viennese and to hear his interpretation of that music took me straight back to von Karajan when I was in high school and I found myself crying because it was so amazing.

SDR: That’s the familiarity with the artform and the music that opens something inside of us. When we’re in at a concert and we hear a performance that is better than anything we ever thought to hear it adds to our experience of — of life.

KB: That’s right! It informs your life experience absolutely. It increases your life’s vocabulary. That’s a bit touchy-feely. I’m in California though, I can get away with that, right?

SDR: Yes, yes you can. We’ve got covens of crystal-wearing Wiccan adherents all over the place.

KB: Benjamin Britten once gave a speech about classical music. He said that for classical music to be successful it requires a triangular structure. Each leg of the triangle needs to do its work and pull its weight. One leg is the composer, the people who create the music. Another leg is the performer who takes the creation and make it our own. The third leg is the audience. The composers have to do their research and their work, the performers have to do their research and their work and the audience has to do their research and their work. All three need to happen to have a successful concert.

SDR: What do you think about change the word “work” to “love”, this is So Cal, you know.

KB: But that’s right. It’s not so much work as something we all love. It’s like a great big love-fest. Part of that love is opening yourself to the music and letting yourself go with it.

Audiences can feel the love at San Diego Opera’s Elixir of Love starting February 15th at the Civic Theater.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Todd Gloria gets cash from Juan Vargas cronies

Robert Price, David Malcom, Mel Katz – the Measure A fat cats
Caricature of Kevin Burnette as Dulcamara by Joseph Sanabria.
Caricature of Kevin Burnette as Dulcamara by Joseph Sanabria.
Past Event

San Diego Opera: The Elixir of Love

...Continuing with our interview of opera singer Kevin Burdette.

San Diego Reader: Are you married?

Kevin Burdette: I am. I met my wife while working at a law firm in New York — well, wait. I’ll tell you a little about my background. In undergrad I was pre-law all the way. I spent a year abroad after my junior year and I went to Vienna, Austria. I’d always done music on the side, sort of avocationally, but in Vienna music is the lifeblood of the city. I went to the Vienna State Opera every week and got standing room tickets which were three bucks at the time. I realized that music doesn’t have to be an avocation, if it’s what your passion is, it can by your vocation. When I got back for my senior year I decided to apply to law school and to graduate school for music. Law school deferred and grad school didn’t. So I went to grad school at Juilliard in New York and then was accepted into the young artist’s program in Paris and kept deferring law school. Then I got my debut at New York City Opera which is where I cut my teeth. I ended up deferring law school at Columbia for six years. After six years I believe I was focusing on the negative aspects of a singing career, which are manifold. You know, you’re on the road and you don’t get rich doing it and it’s a hard time having a social life. As in any career there are negative aspects of it and I was focusing on them. I thought perhaps I was so negative on singing because law school was still out there. I went to law school and I was in New York so I was able to sing and be in law school. I graduated in 2007 and went to work in commercial real estate for a big New York law firm. You don’t sing and work for a law firm in New York. I would take vacation time to sing but there was no taking four weeks off to go sing Donizetti in San Diego. After about two years I got a couple offers to sing. One was to sing Mozart in Buenos Aires at the Teatro Colon and the other was to make my Met Debut in Strauss’ Elektra. I got a leave of absence from the firm, went to Buenos Aires and then while I was at the Met I thought, “Oh yeah, this is a lot more fun.” So, in 2010, I came crawling back to opera.

SDR: Do you also paint and write poetry or something?

KB: [laughing] NO, but that’s where I met my wife. She was a lawyer at the law firm.

SDR: So you still get to talk law?

KB: Oh yes, it’s fascinating...at least to lawyers.

SDR: Besides opera, what do you listen to?

KB: 80’s pop such as The Cars, The Violent Femmes, Psychedelic Furs, you know, stuff like that.

SDR: I lean toward the 80s as well. I’ve made a serious effort to engage with current pop music but I just don’t find much that resonates with me.

KB: I’m with you. I have a niece who is 23 and she’ll send me a newer pop song that she’ll think I like, based on my tastes. I like some of it, I get the grove but I don’t get hooked.

SDR: Do you listen to symphonic music?

KB: I do listen to symphonic music. That was my introduction to classical music. I grew up in Knoxville and went to the monthly concerts by the Knoxville symphony. I really got into it. I got into the DG recordings with von Karajan and Berlin. I still listen to his cycle of Beethoven Symphonies from the 1960s. I’m into the Strauss tone poems. I heard the Cleveland Symphony play and Carnegie Hall a couple of years ago. They did a Viennese and German concert and Franz Welser-Möst was conducting. He’s Viennese and to hear his interpretation of that music took me straight back to von Karajan when I was in high school and I found myself crying because it was so amazing.

SDR: That’s the familiarity with the artform and the music that opens something inside of us. When we’re in at a concert and we hear a performance that is better than anything we ever thought to hear it adds to our experience of — of life.

KB: That’s right! It informs your life experience absolutely. It increases your life’s vocabulary. That’s a bit touchy-feely. I’m in California though, I can get away with that, right?

SDR: Yes, yes you can. We’ve got covens of crystal-wearing Wiccan adherents all over the place.

KB: Benjamin Britten once gave a speech about classical music. He said that for classical music to be successful it requires a triangular structure. Each leg of the triangle needs to do its work and pull its weight. One leg is the composer, the people who create the music. Another leg is the performer who takes the creation and make it our own. The third leg is the audience. The composers have to do their research and their work, the performers have to do their research and their work and the audience has to do their research and their work. All three need to happen to have a successful concert.

SDR: What do you think about change the word “work” to “love”, this is So Cal, you know.

KB: But that’s right. It’s not so much work as something we all love. It’s like a great big love-fest. Part of that love is opening yourself to the music and letting yourself go with it.

Audiences can feel the love at San Diego Opera’s Elixir of Love starting February 15th at the Civic Theater.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Tropical terrycloth

Lexington Field, Wanted Noise, Jelani Aryeh, Belladon, Planet B
Next Article

The United States Department of Agriculture’s 160-degree pork guideline

Or when mainstream society started catching up with what hip, in-the-know people had known for years
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close