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Those people are like rats. You'll never get rid of them.

New Moon = No Moon

Re: “Naked and Alone in the Ocean at Night,” April 10 cover story.

Near the end of the story it says that she entered the water “sometime around midnight.” Two sentences later it states, “The sky was overcast and blocked out the new moon.”

This is not possible. A new moon is the first phase of the moon, when it lies closest to the sun in the sky as seen from Earth. More precisely, it is the instant when the moon and the sun have the same ecliptic longitude. The moon is not normally visible at this time except when it is seen in silhouette during a solar eclipse.

Anyone else catch the mistake? Just trying to help.

  • Blake J. Finlay
  • Bonita


Those People Are Like Rats

This concerns your cover story in the April 10 Reader, “Naked and Alone in the Ocean at Night.”

I just wonder, with all these different theories they came up with trying to figure out what happened to her, I wonder if some Mexican speedboat might have run her down. This is just speculation, but they’ve been coming up here in boats for years and years trying to run dope, or aliens, or what have you.

Have any of the detectives or coroner’s people ever thought that she was out there swimming at night and some Mexican boat ran her down in the dark and just left her there to die out in the water?

People like that have no conscience. They have no morals, no soul. I can very easily see that Mexican drug smugglers might have done something like that.

The coroner did say that the condition of her leg bone where it had been severed did not look like a shark bite. It looked like maybe a boat propeller had cut her there. I don’t know how they’d ever catch the people. Those people are like rats. You’ll never catch them.

Actually, this was the first time I’ve ever heard of this occurrence. I don’t remember every having read anything about it twenty years ago.

  • Name Withheld
  • via voicemail


All the Right Notes

Thank you for the piece on the assisted-living facility for people with Down syndrome and other developmental disabilities (“We Should All Live So Well,” April 3 cover story). I have an adult son who has been living at a similar home since 2005, and I think you hit all the right notes.

Sponsored
Sponsored

It’s encouraging to read about the caring and competent people who run Noah Homes – specifically the way they provide an enhanced quality of life to their clients without going into debt. Over the years I’ve often been dismayed by the “resources” available to my son. Like many other families, mine sought to fill the gap with our own efforts, for as long as that was possible (and I remain involved — fatherspledge.com).

This is a human rights issue, for people with few real advocates. Articles like this are important, both for general consciousness-raising, and to acknowledge those who are doing something right.

  • Steve Gallup
  • Carmel Valley


Taking Care of Bees’ Nests

Thanks for publishing the story about Hilary Kearney and her beekeeping work (“Bees on the Brain,” March 27). It was very interesting. Just a few days after reading it, a swarm of bees arrived in my back yard. I visited her website, girlnextdoorhoney.com, filled out a handy online contact form (Live Bee Removal), and received a quick reply.

Her father came out a few hours later, put the bees in a temporary hive, and removed them. The bees will be placed with someone who is able to take care of a hive. A program is also offered where people can host a hive, installed and cared for by people from Girl Next Door Honey.

As noted in the article, bee populations are declining worldwide, in large part due to the use of pesticides, particularly a class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids. It was gratifying to see firsthand how some very good people are working to fight this trend by encouraging and helping us to utilize this precious resource instead of wasting it by exterminating unwanted bees.

  • Hal Truschke
  • Bay Ho


Side of Drama, No Charge

Thank you, San Diego Reader, for publishing “It’s All Free,” (March 13 cover story) a fantastic example of San Diego’s successful adult education system. Students creating their own small businesses at an education cost of zero, thanks to San Diego Continuing Education’s free classes. We need more of this — especially during this economy.

In the South Bay, the Sweetwater Union High School District adult school program has been cut repeatedly, leaving the current class schedule a sad fraction of its previous glory. We need more classes for our population.

As illustrated by your article, adult school can be an important step in creating financially stable, independent adults better able to provide for their families. Dale Carnegie, author of the iconic book, How to Win Friends and Influence People, initially began as an adult educator.

In this immigrant-rich area, thousands of Spanish speakers need additional English skills and job training to go forward in life. Yet most evening classes have been shortened by 15 minutes. That’s one hour of instruction lost per week.

During the 2012-2013 school year, Montgomery Adult School was threatened with closure. Teachers received notice to remove all personal property during summer break. A decree issued by Governor Brown perhaps saved the school, stating that adult schools open during the 2012-2013 school year were to remain open into the next school year. But damage was done. Student enrollment is down by 20% as students opted to enroll in other adult schools rather than gamble on whether their school would still be open. Montgomery could face a 20% budget cut if future funding is based on student attendance. Classes and teachers would be cut.

Happy teachers make better teachers. A culture of fear among Sweetwater’s adult school teachers has been cultivated throughout the years with cautious reminders that Sweetwater’s adult schools remained open because of the good grace of the school board which, despite the needs of the area’s adult population, could divert adult school funding elsewhere. The district losing money speculating in real estate, expensive consultants and legal council, iPads for 7th graders (instead of much cheaper tablets), the intent to buy a new office headquarters in the expensive Eastlake area away from most of Sweetwater’s student population, and teacher negotiations over benefits could lead to budget issues. Sweetwater’s teachers have been working without a contract and this March overwhelmingly approved to strike if and when the union deems it necessary.

Susan Luzzaro’s coverage of the literal trials and tribulations of the Sweetwater District is excellent and much needed. One board member’s recent guilty plea will result in a second board member having to resign her post. It’s a big bad dirty soap opera that just won’t stop here in the South Bay.

San Diego Continuing Education is doing its job correctly — and free for students. At Sweetwater, students pay a $40 fee, but the drama comes at no additional charge.

  • Name Withheld
  • Chula Vista


Stiffed

Earl Stiff’s Oscar rant (Big Screen: “Earl Stiff’s Oscar Recap,” March 6) was long, juvenile, and woefully unfunny. I suggest you kick him to the curb!

  • Name Withheld
  • via snail mail


Thanks All Around

I would like to thank Ken Leighton. I have been waiting since January 1, 2013, when Anthology closed to get some updated and correct information on the takeover and reopening of that venue, which I’ve probably been to over 20 times since 2009.

Just my luck that the week I go skiing in Telluride, Colorado, is the week that Ken Leighton published that article (Blurt: “Back-Door Deal,” February 20).

I asked someone to save the Reader for me while I was gone and they didn’t. Whoever issued a clarification in this week’s Reader did me a favor because it alerted me to the article. I have to applaud your website people too because when I went to your website and typed in “back door deal,” I didn’t even have to use the date and I found the story.

So, it looks like this outfit from Best Beverage and Catering is going to take Anthology over. Just want to thank Ken for that news and to encourage him and anyone else at your paper to keep the public informed.

Anthology is an incredibly fabulous venue. I just looked at the Humphrey’s schedule for the summer and I’m so disappointed. I’m disappointed in what Humphrey’s is not producing. And the fair is having what they call “A Return of the British Invasion.” Yet, there’s not a single live British band playing at the fair this summer. They’re all American cover bands. It’s a huge disappointment. Anthology is the only bright light on the Horizon.

I went to 40 concerts last year — 30 the year before. I go to Cerritos, 80 miles to the north. I go there at least a half-dozen times per year. We are really hurting for music down here. Anthology coming back is the greatest news I’ve heard in years.

  • Lee Juskalian
  • Cardiff


A Kook Coup

I acknowledge the Reader for its support of the arts. With regard to the 2014 Guide to the Arts in San Diego cover contest winner, a so-called “anonymous surf street artist,” BERT’s cover was different than the trite slap-ons he puts up in Encinitas, which are thinly veiled promotions for his pro-surfer idols.

Instead, his cover promotes his not-so-anonymous self. A Kook coup.

  • Mark Klammer
  • Encinitas


No Longer Happy

Okay, so I can only speak for the area where I live, Ocean Beach, because I don’t get out much. But, I’d like to! So, that’s why whenever I’m planning a happy hour outing, I look up different spots in the Happy Hour section that sound fun.

But it seems that you guys are two years behind in your information! Several of the places you list, in several San Diego locations, are gone, have changed ownership, are no longer restaurants, are now parking lots, etcetera, etcetera, etcetera. There are really too many to list so I’ll just stick to these few:

Cardiff — The Beach House: no longer open.

OB — Blue Parrot: closed long ago.

Point Loma — Gabardine: Gaba-gone!

There are a few other places up through La Jolla that are not correct either. Just thought you guys would want to update your info.

  • Monica Rodriguez
  • Ocean Beach

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New Moon = No Moon

Re: “Naked and Alone in the Ocean at Night,” April 10 cover story.

Near the end of the story it says that she entered the water “sometime around midnight.” Two sentences later it states, “The sky was overcast and blocked out the new moon.”

This is not possible. A new moon is the first phase of the moon, when it lies closest to the sun in the sky as seen from Earth. More precisely, it is the instant when the moon and the sun have the same ecliptic longitude. The moon is not normally visible at this time except when it is seen in silhouette during a solar eclipse.

Anyone else catch the mistake? Just trying to help.

  • Blake J. Finlay
  • Bonita


Those People Are Like Rats

This concerns your cover story in the April 10 Reader, “Naked and Alone in the Ocean at Night.”

I just wonder, with all these different theories they came up with trying to figure out what happened to her, I wonder if some Mexican speedboat might have run her down. This is just speculation, but they’ve been coming up here in boats for years and years trying to run dope, or aliens, or what have you.

Have any of the detectives or coroner’s people ever thought that she was out there swimming at night and some Mexican boat ran her down in the dark and just left her there to die out in the water?

People like that have no conscience. They have no morals, no soul. I can very easily see that Mexican drug smugglers might have done something like that.

The coroner did say that the condition of her leg bone where it had been severed did not look like a shark bite. It looked like maybe a boat propeller had cut her there. I don’t know how they’d ever catch the people. Those people are like rats. You’ll never catch them.

Actually, this was the first time I’ve ever heard of this occurrence. I don’t remember every having read anything about it twenty years ago.

  • Name Withheld
  • via voicemail


All the Right Notes

Thank you for the piece on the assisted-living facility for people with Down syndrome and other developmental disabilities (“We Should All Live So Well,” April 3 cover story). I have an adult son who has been living at a similar home since 2005, and I think you hit all the right notes.

Sponsored
Sponsored

It’s encouraging to read about the caring and competent people who run Noah Homes – specifically the way they provide an enhanced quality of life to their clients without going into debt. Over the years I’ve often been dismayed by the “resources” available to my son. Like many other families, mine sought to fill the gap with our own efforts, for as long as that was possible (and I remain involved — fatherspledge.com).

This is a human rights issue, for people with few real advocates. Articles like this are important, both for general consciousness-raising, and to acknowledge those who are doing something right.

  • Steve Gallup
  • Carmel Valley


Taking Care of Bees’ Nests

Thanks for publishing the story about Hilary Kearney and her beekeeping work (“Bees on the Brain,” March 27). It was very interesting. Just a few days after reading it, a swarm of bees arrived in my back yard. I visited her website, girlnextdoorhoney.com, filled out a handy online contact form (Live Bee Removal), and received a quick reply.

Her father came out a few hours later, put the bees in a temporary hive, and removed them. The bees will be placed with someone who is able to take care of a hive. A program is also offered where people can host a hive, installed and cared for by people from Girl Next Door Honey.

As noted in the article, bee populations are declining worldwide, in large part due to the use of pesticides, particularly a class of pesticides known as neonicotinoids. It was gratifying to see firsthand how some very good people are working to fight this trend by encouraging and helping us to utilize this precious resource instead of wasting it by exterminating unwanted bees.

  • Hal Truschke
  • Bay Ho


Side of Drama, No Charge

Thank you, San Diego Reader, for publishing “It’s All Free,” (March 13 cover story) a fantastic example of San Diego’s successful adult education system. Students creating their own small businesses at an education cost of zero, thanks to San Diego Continuing Education’s free classes. We need more of this — especially during this economy.

In the South Bay, the Sweetwater Union High School District adult school program has been cut repeatedly, leaving the current class schedule a sad fraction of its previous glory. We need more classes for our population.

As illustrated by your article, adult school can be an important step in creating financially stable, independent adults better able to provide for their families. Dale Carnegie, author of the iconic book, How to Win Friends and Influence People, initially began as an adult educator.

In this immigrant-rich area, thousands of Spanish speakers need additional English skills and job training to go forward in life. Yet most evening classes have been shortened by 15 minutes. That’s one hour of instruction lost per week.

During the 2012-2013 school year, Montgomery Adult School was threatened with closure. Teachers received notice to remove all personal property during summer break. A decree issued by Governor Brown perhaps saved the school, stating that adult schools open during the 2012-2013 school year were to remain open into the next school year. But damage was done. Student enrollment is down by 20% as students opted to enroll in other adult schools rather than gamble on whether their school would still be open. Montgomery could face a 20% budget cut if future funding is based on student attendance. Classes and teachers would be cut.

Happy teachers make better teachers. A culture of fear among Sweetwater’s adult school teachers has been cultivated throughout the years with cautious reminders that Sweetwater’s adult schools remained open because of the good grace of the school board which, despite the needs of the area’s adult population, could divert adult school funding elsewhere. The district losing money speculating in real estate, expensive consultants and legal council, iPads for 7th graders (instead of much cheaper tablets), the intent to buy a new office headquarters in the expensive Eastlake area away from most of Sweetwater’s student population, and teacher negotiations over benefits could lead to budget issues. Sweetwater’s teachers have been working without a contract and this March overwhelmingly approved to strike if and when the union deems it necessary.

Susan Luzzaro’s coverage of the literal trials and tribulations of the Sweetwater District is excellent and much needed. One board member’s recent guilty plea will result in a second board member having to resign her post. It’s a big bad dirty soap opera that just won’t stop here in the South Bay.

San Diego Continuing Education is doing its job correctly — and free for students. At Sweetwater, students pay a $40 fee, but the drama comes at no additional charge.

  • Name Withheld
  • Chula Vista


Stiffed

Earl Stiff’s Oscar rant (Big Screen: “Earl Stiff’s Oscar Recap,” March 6) was long, juvenile, and woefully unfunny. I suggest you kick him to the curb!

  • Name Withheld
  • via snail mail


Thanks All Around

I would like to thank Ken Leighton. I have been waiting since January 1, 2013, when Anthology closed to get some updated and correct information on the takeover and reopening of that venue, which I’ve probably been to over 20 times since 2009.

Just my luck that the week I go skiing in Telluride, Colorado, is the week that Ken Leighton published that article (Blurt: “Back-Door Deal,” February 20).

I asked someone to save the Reader for me while I was gone and they didn’t. Whoever issued a clarification in this week’s Reader did me a favor because it alerted me to the article. I have to applaud your website people too because when I went to your website and typed in “back door deal,” I didn’t even have to use the date and I found the story.

So, it looks like this outfit from Best Beverage and Catering is going to take Anthology over. Just want to thank Ken for that news and to encourage him and anyone else at your paper to keep the public informed.

Anthology is an incredibly fabulous venue. I just looked at the Humphrey’s schedule for the summer and I’m so disappointed. I’m disappointed in what Humphrey’s is not producing. And the fair is having what they call “A Return of the British Invasion.” Yet, there’s not a single live British band playing at the fair this summer. They’re all American cover bands. It’s a huge disappointment. Anthology is the only bright light on the Horizon.

I went to 40 concerts last year — 30 the year before. I go to Cerritos, 80 miles to the north. I go there at least a half-dozen times per year. We are really hurting for music down here. Anthology coming back is the greatest news I’ve heard in years.

  • Lee Juskalian
  • Cardiff


A Kook Coup

I acknowledge the Reader for its support of the arts. With regard to the 2014 Guide to the Arts in San Diego cover contest winner, a so-called “anonymous surf street artist,” BERT’s cover was different than the trite slap-ons he puts up in Encinitas, which are thinly veiled promotions for his pro-surfer idols.

Instead, his cover promotes his not-so-anonymous self. A Kook coup.

  • Mark Klammer
  • Encinitas


No Longer Happy

Okay, so I can only speak for the area where I live, Ocean Beach, because I don’t get out much. But, I’d like to! So, that’s why whenever I’m planning a happy hour outing, I look up different spots in the Happy Hour section that sound fun.

But it seems that you guys are two years behind in your information! Several of the places you list, in several San Diego locations, are gone, have changed ownership, are no longer restaurants, are now parking lots, etcetera, etcetera, etcetera. There are really too many to list so I’ll just stick to these few:

Cardiff — The Beach House: no longer open.

OB — Blue Parrot: closed long ago.

Point Loma — Gabardine: Gaba-gone!

There are a few other places up through La Jolla that are not correct either. Just thought you guys would want to update your info.

  • Monica Rodriguez
  • Ocean Beach
Comments
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The latest copy of the Reader

Please enjoy this clickable Reader flipbook. Linked text and ads are flash-highlighted in blue for your convenience. To enhance your viewing, please open full screen mode by clicking the icon on the far right of the black flipbook toolbar.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Tijuana's Agua Caliente gets the Fountain of the Faun restored

Play It Again, Pan
Next Article

The Mental Bar brightens the neighborhood with lattes

Encanto coffee shop serves caffeinated beverages with a side of wellness
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