Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Report on teacher training programs rips local universities

A report released last week by the National Council on Teacher Quality, an advocacy group founded in 2000 and boasting board membership of veterans from the former Reagan, Clinton, and George W. Bush administrations, blasts the quality of education in teacher-training programs at 1,130 universities across the country, including several here in San Diego.

Programs with low standards for acceptance - three-quarters of teaching programs studied aren’t limited to students in the top 50 percent of their high school graduating classes - are churning out far too many teachers, the Council says. Of 239,000 teachers trained each year, only about 98,000 land jobs in education.

Further, the training these prospective educators receive is substandard – three in four education programs don’t use the latest available techniques in preparing teachers to help students learn to read, and only seven percent ensure that student teaching is done under the supervision of a veteran with proven effectiveness (most are paired with any teacher willing to allow a student in the classroom).

The report ranks schools on a one-to-four star program, with the weakest receiving no stars and a “Consumer Alert” warning. After doing ten pilot studies, a ratings system with 18 criteria including classroom management, math teaching skills, and several relating to reading development were adopted for use in the overall study.

Overall, local results were disappointing. CSU San Marcos received one star for its secondary education graduate program, while its elementary program received zero. San Diego State University and the University of San Diego received the same rankings. Point Loma Nazarene University fared slightly better, receiving one star for its elementary program and 1.5 for secondary education.

The standout, and the only local school to make the report’s “honor roll” by earning three or more stars (just nine percent of all schools studied achieved this rank) was UC San Diego, earning 3.5 stars for its secondary education graduate program. UCSD does not offer elementary education coursework.

Local for-profit Bridgepoint Education, which offers education training via its Iowa-based Ashford University mainly to online students, was not included in the rankings.

“A program’s low rating does not suggest that many of its graduates don’t go on to become capable teachers,” cautions the report. “What the low rating does suggest is that the program isn’t adding sufficient value, so that someone who wants to become a teacher would be better off investing time and tuition dollars elsewhere.”

“Good programs will thrive. Weak programs will either improve or wither.”

The full text of the report is available here.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Two poems by Julia Wehner

A reminder of how richly good it is to feel, and to live
Next Article

“I Come From the Andromeda Galaxy”

Alfred Howard, James Brady, Me, Myself and Eye, Orchid Mantis, Puttin’ on the Fritz

A report released last week by the National Council on Teacher Quality, an advocacy group founded in 2000 and boasting board membership of veterans from the former Reagan, Clinton, and George W. Bush administrations, blasts the quality of education in teacher-training programs at 1,130 universities across the country, including several here in San Diego.

Programs with low standards for acceptance - three-quarters of teaching programs studied aren’t limited to students in the top 50 percent of their high school graduating classes - are churning out far too many teachers, the Council says. Of 239,000 teachers trained each year, only about 98,000 land jobs in education.

Further, the training these prospective educators receive is substandard – three in four education programs don’t use the latest available techniques in preparing teachers to help students learn to read, and only seven percent ensure that student teaching is done under the supervision of a veteran with proven effectiveness (most are paired with any teacher willing to allow a student in the classroom).

The report ranks schools on a one-to-four star program, with the weakest receiving no stars and a “Consumer Alert” warning. After doing ten pilot studies, a ratings system with 18 criteria including classroom management, math teaching skills, and several relating to reading development were adopted for use in the overall study.

Overall, local results were disappointing. CSU San Marcos received one star for its secondary education graduate program, while its elementary program received zero. San Diego State University and the University of San Diego received the same rankings. Point Loma Nazarene University fared slightly better, receiving one star for its elementary program and 1.5 for secondary education.

The standout, and the only local school to make the report’s “honor roll” by earning three or more stars (just nine percent of all schools studied achieved this rank) was UC San Diego, earning 3.5 stars for its secondary education graduate program. UCSD does not offer elementary education coursework.

Local for-profit Bridgepoint Education, which offers education training via its Iowa-based Ashford University mainly to online students, was not included in the rankings.

“A program’s low rating does not suggest that many of its graduates don’t go on to become capable teachers,” cautions the report. “What the low rating does suggest is that the program isn’t adding sufficient value, so that someone who wants to become a teacher would be better off investing time and tuition dollars elsewhere.”

“Good programs will thrive. Weak programs will either improve or wither.”

The full text of the report is available here.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Jorge Hank's wealthy nephew heads for White House dinner

Tijuana billionaire's relative an AMLO invite
Next Article

Jorge Hank's wealthy nephew heads for White House dinner

Tijuana billionaire's relative an AMLO invite
Comments
3

Typical. This post has been up for about a full day, and not a single comment. Anyone who came out of those low-scoring programs should be up in arms, especially if he or she completed the program recently and is still unemployed.

The comment about how people may still become successful teachers is a good one. Most of what is required is not really teachable, but is rather part of the teacher's personality, attitude, and dedication. But we still insist that teachers in the state have a minimum of a "fifth year" of college to be qualified.

The high ranking of the UCSD program is a bit of a surprise. I wasn't impressed by it, and the recommendation is that it drew a better student than the others. A couple decades ago, that campus did have elementary teacher preparation; why it was dropped is anyone's guess. They did emphasize fields that were not glutted with teachers, such as math, science, and English. There are always plenty of those who want to teach social studies, PE, music, and vocational subjects.

The surprising part is the comment that the system is turning out far more teachers than are hired. All I've heard for years is that there is either a current "shortage" of teachers, or a looming shortage. Maybe ten years ago, we had a VUSD trustee heavily involved in some sort of program to insure that the teachers who would be needed in the future were there. At the time it seemed silly, and if the statistic that the US currently overproduces teachers by a factor of about 2.4:1 is true, was definitely goofy. There are spot shortages in certain fields at certain times, but here in San Diego County, no teaching job ever goes unfilled by a qualified person. Heck, to most of the nation, this is the Garden of Eden, and thousands of people will do almost anything within reason to locate here.

June 26, 2013

This is a bogus study, done by a bogus group--all very pro Common Core, which is quite the rage these days.

The worst of it is that data mining becomes the driving concern with Common Core.

All part of the corporatization of the public school system, something that I find wrong and frightening.

June 26, 2013

OK, Eastlaker, valid or no, that study should be provoking a huge number of comments, and only you and I have bothered. This is typical of what I've seen before when a blog post involved UCSD. As in no comments at all, no outrage, no braggadocio, no nothing. Is anyone reading these blogs?

June 27, 2013

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close