Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Nuclear activist's art highlights Edison’s obfuscation

Utility giant’s released documents show amazing amount of redactions

David Weisman
David Weisman

Although the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station has produced its final megawatt of power, many battles between regulators, activists, and energy companies with ownership stakes in the plant remain to be fought. It remains to be decided, for example, who will pay for the premature failure of new $700-million-plus steam generators at the plant or who will foot the bill for decommissioning the two remaining reactors, which could cost billions. There's also the issue of how to handle tons of highly radioactive nuclear waste, much of it stored in unsealed pools of water.

The Alliance for Nuclear Responsibility is a watchdog group that's been following these and other nuclear-related issues at San Onofre and Diablo Canyon, California's last active nuclear-power plant, for years. The group consistently attends public hearings, submits commentary to regulators, and is frequently at odds with the utility industry.

Alliance staffer David Weisman has been involved in a struggle where plant operator Southern California Edison has suggested utility customers should pay for the failures at San Onofre and the California Public Utilities Commission says ratepayers deserve a refund based on what they've already paid. At the heart of this dispute is what the utility may have known about the generators before they were installed.

Edison doesn't seem to be forthcoming with the information. In a lighthearted attempt to make clear the difficulties the Alliance (appointed by the CPUC as a legal intervenor in the generator-replacement issue) has faced, Weisman has created an art installation entitled Redacted, which went on display this week at the Ocean Beach People's Organic Food Market.

"What was Edison trying to hide in their meetings about the failed steam generators at the San Onofre nuclear plant?" asks Weisman.

Quite a bit, it appears — the exhibit consists of over a dozen pages of documents detailing meetings between Edison and generator manufacturer Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, though black boxes form a virtual bar code over much of the text, over half of which is concealed. Edison has argued that the redacted information concerns proprietary information; critics have argued that it could prove a theory that Edison was aware that major design changes should have subjected the generators to federal review before their installation.

Weisman hopes the display and his other work as a documentarian and outreach coordinator for the Alliance will keep the public at large from forgetting that, while San Onofre is shut down, billions of dollars are still at stake.

"They say the truth isn't always black-and-white," wrote Weisman in an intro to the displayed pages, "but what if it was...and you still couldn't tell?"

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Lydia Loveless, Frazey Ford Live From The Commodore Ballroom, Conquer Your Fear Of Snakes

Events September 24-September 26, 2020
Next Article

Little Italy landmark gets red marble and white marble

Our Lady of the Rosary – beyond the Genoese fishermen
David Weisman
David Weisman

Although the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station has produced its final megawatt of power, many battles between regulators, activists, and energy companies with ownership stakes in the plant remain to be fought. It remains to be decided, for example, who will pay for the premature failure of new $700-million-plus steam generators at the plant or who will foot the bill for decommissioning the two remaining reactors, which could cost billions. There's also the issue of how to handle tons of highly radioactive nuclear waste, much of it stored in unsealed pools of water.

The Alliance for Nuclear Responsibility is a watchdog group that's been following these and other nuclear-related issues at San Onofre and Diablo Canyon, California's last active nuclear-power plant, for years. The group consistently attends public hearings, submits commentary to regulators, and is frequently at odds with the utility industry.

Alliance staffer David Weisman has been involved in a struggle where plant operator Southern California Edison has suggested utility customers should pay for the failures at San Onofre and the California Public Utilities Commission says ratepayers deserve a refund based on what they've already paid. At the heart of this dispute is what the utility may have known about the generators before they were installed.

Edison doesn't seem to be forthcoming with the information. In a lighthearted attempt to make clear the difficulties the Alliance (appointed by the CPUC as a legal intervenor in the generator-replacement issue) has faced, Weisman has created an art installation entitled Redacted, which went on display this week at the Ocean Beach People's Organic Food Market.

"What was Edison trying to hide in their meetings about the failed steam generators at the San Onofre nuclear plant?" asks Weisman.

Quite a bit, it appears — the exhibit consists of over a dozen pages of documents detailing meetings between Edison and generator manufacturer Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, though black boxes form a virtual bar code over much of the text, over half of which is concealed. Edison has argued that the redacted information concerns proprietary information; critics have argued that it could prove a theory that Edison was aware that major design changes should have subjected the generators to federal review before their installation.

Weisman hopes the display and his other work as a documentarian and outreach coordinator for the Alliance will keep the public at large from forgetting that, while San Onofre is shut down, billions of dollars are still at stake.

"They say the truth isn't always black-and-white," wrote Weisman in an intro to the displayed pages, "but what if it was...and you still couldn't tell?"

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Protestors accuse Trump Boat Parade of trading in racist stereotypes

White Suprema-sea?
Next Article

Unexpendable Rambo

The first and fourth foray
Comments
1

Our public utilities are hiding both their operational failures and their fiscal mismanagement of San Onofre from public scrutiny, by claiming that most of what they do (and have done) is proprietary information!

This legal excuse has been allowed far too often by both the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) who is charged with regulating operational safety and the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) who is charged with regulating the fiscal operation of the San Onofre Nuclear Power Plant (NPP). Even during the CPUC's current investigations into the "reasonableness of SCE's decisions" that led up to the multi-billion dollar San Onofre decommissioning, which was caused by SCE's in-house replacement steam generator design failure, those seeking to publicize exactly what went wrong, exactly who exactly at SCE make those decisions and when they were made, have be refused access to un-redacted documents by SCE, SDG&E, the CPUC and the NRC!

This is a key issue because without un-redacted documents, those seeking to protect ratepayers from getting stuck with the bill for SCE's engineering debacle are essentially fighting with one hand tied behind their back, having to depend upon whistle blowers and others that have provided personal copies of important documents to go along with Utility provided sanitized redacted documents. It is also important to mention that it is not only citizen groups like ANC and locally the Coalition to Decommission San Onofre (CDSO) are having problems with the CPUC but even CA Senator Boxer has now asked the NRC for a full and complete set of San Onofre documents having received informational packets from them with two different document listings, many of which were not provided, even though Senator Boxer Chairs the Committee on Environmental and Public Works, which oversee the NRC!

Since the CPUC is charged with insuring equal treatment of BOTH ratepayers and the Utilities that serve them. It is painfully obvious that the ratepayers have been stuck with borderline criminally unsafe Utility decisions that have resulted in the early decommissioning of San Onofre, which will result in Billions of dollars of decommissioning costs, much of which have not yet been collected, the cost of which must be borne by the Utility(s) that caused them, since they, not the ratepayers made these poor financial decisions without any input from ratepayers who have no oversight over them...

Dec. 21, 2013

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close