Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Trailer and heavy load abandoned in Dulzura?

Apparatus has sat on road shoulder since August 7

A massively oversized semi trailer that broke down last Wednesday (August 7) has baffled and frustrated residents of the East County community of Dulzura. The veritable train of trailers sat on the side of Highway 94 near the intersection of Marron Valley Road for a week.

The truck was traveling east on SR-94 when it broke down shortly before 2 a.m., blocking traffic in both directions for hours. Some six hours later, according to California Highway Patrol reports, the 400,000-pound “super load” was moved to a point where the road could be partially reopened. The following day, according to reports, it moved about 100 yards up the road and onto a shoulder, its resting place for the next week.

Local resident and artist Robin Brailsford contacted the Reader looking for information on the truck August 13.

“Since the [2007] fires, the 94 is not certified for loads over 75 feet,” said Brailsford, echoing concerns of area residents who had to use the 94 as the sole escape route when the fire chased them from their homes.

At the site on August 13, the semi truck that had been pulling the trailer was nowhere to be found, though the trailer, several sets of auxiliary axles supporting it, and a second semi — functioning as a “pusher” vehicle — were still connected. Without considering the missing tow vehicle, the remaining assembly, with its 14 axles and 106 tires, was nearly 200 feet long.

“The trailer has all those extra axles to distribute the weight of the load evenly across the highway, otherwise bridges would collapse and highways would get torn up from that much weight,” explains Ryan McGaughy, the CEO and operations manager for East County’s Borneman Trucking. “That’s for really heavy stuff.”

Spanish-language installation instructions attached to the load, a large-scale oil compressor about 20 feet wide and 40 feet long, indicated that its final destination might be Mexico, which was confirmed after speaking with UE Compression, a Henderson, Colorado-based manufacturer of industrial compressors.

“We don’t make those decisions; the state and [California Highway Patrol] does," UE’s Randy Crapsey told the Reader about the route the truck was traveling when it broke down.

Crapsey said the transport of such large loads is overseen by various state transportation departments, several of which UE and trucking firm KD Specialized of Salina, Kansas, have had involvement with during the weeks-long process of moving the compressor across the Southwestern United States.

UE confirmed that the rig was headed for the Tecate border crossing but declined to comment on its final destination, disclosed only as “somewhere down in Mexico” due to “proprietary information.”

Brailsford and other locals were displeased about the route choice.

“Why did it not go across at Otay and then east on the Tijuana-Tecate toll road?” Brailsford asked. “They built a specific truck-crossing at Otay.”

UE said there had been delays in acquiring an alternate “heavy spec” tractor truck from out of state to continue the journey, and that the CHP had placed additional requirements for having backup equipment on site before resuming the journey to Tecate.

An unnamed employee who originally answered the phone said the new truck should have already arrived, but Crapsey was confident everything would be in place to remove the trailer and its load by Tuesday night.

As of Friday, August 16, however, another effort to move the trailer failed after a move of less than 300 yards, and it was returned to its previous location.

Updated 8/17, 10:15 a.m.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Unexpected views from some San Diego African Americans

"I don't care if you're black or white"

A massively oversized semi trailer that broke down last Wednesday (August 7) has baffled and frustrated residents of the East County community of Dulzura. The veritable train of trailers sat on the side of Highway 94 near the intersection of Marron Valley Road for a week.

The truck was traveling east on SR-94 when it broke down shortly before 2 a.m., blocking traffic in both directions for hours. Some six hours later, according to California Highway Patrol reports, the 400,000-pound “super load” was moved to a point where the road could be partially reopened. The following day, according to reports, it moved about 100 yards up the road and onto a shoulder, its resting place for the next week.

Local resident and artist Robin Brailsford contacted the Reader looking for information on the truck August 13.

“Since the [2007] fires, the 94 is not certified for loads over 75 feet,” said Brailsford, echoing concerns of area residents who had to use the 94 as the sole escape route when the fire chased them from their homes.

At the site on August 13, the semi truck that had been pulling the trailer was nowhere to be found, though the trailer, several sets of auxiliary axles supporting it, and a second semi — functioning as a “pusher” vehicle — were still connected. Without considering the missing tow vehicle, the remaining assembly, with its 14 axles and 106 tires, was nearly 200 feet long.

“The trailer has all those extra axles to distribute the weight of the load evenly across the highway, otherwise bridges would collapse and highways would get torn up from that much weight,” explains Ryan McGaughy, the CEO and operations manager for East County’s Borneman Trucking. “That’s for really heavy stuff.”

Spanish-language installation instructions attached to the load, a large-scale oil compressor about 20 feet wide and 40 feet long, indicated that its final destination might be Mexico, which was confirmed after speaking with UE Compression, a Henderson, Colorado-based manufacturer of industrial compressors.

“We don’t make those decisions; the state and [California Highway Patrol] does," UE’s Randy Crapsey told the Reader about the route the truck was traveling when it broke down.

Crapsey said the transport of such large loads is overseen by various state transportation departments, several of which UE and trucking firm KD Specialized of Salina, Kansas, have had involvement with during the weeks-long process of moving the compressor across the Southwestern United States.

UE confirmed that the rig was headed for the Tecate border crossing but declined to comment on its final destination, disclosed only as “somewhere down in Mexico” due to “proprietary information.”

Brailsford and other locals were displeased about the route choice.

“Why did it not go across at Otay and then east on the Tijuana-Tecate toll road?” Brailsford asked. “They built a specific truck-crossing at Otay.”

UE said there had been delays in acquiring an alternate “heavy spec” tractor truck from out of state to continue the journey, and that the CHP had placed additional requirements for having backup equipment on site before resuming the journey to Tecate.

An unnamed employee who originally answered the phone said the new truck should have already arrived, but Crapsey was confident everything would be in place to remove the trailer and its load by Tuesday night.

As of Friday, August 16, however, another effort to move the trailer failed after a move of less than 300 yards, and it was returned to its previous location.

Updated 8/17, 10:15 a.m.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Vista City Attorney and James Buss donate to Trump campaign

Chula Vista's Jill Galvez barred from voting on fire trucks
Next Article

What San Diego restaurant staffs eat, dumpster diving for dinner

How food critic Naomi Wise started her life in San Diego, how food critic Eleanor Widmer ended hers
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close