Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

I make me nervous

Former SD DJ Collins subject of rock doc The Glamour and the Squalor
Former SD DJ Collins subject of rock doc The Glamour and the Squalor

Marco Collins is probably best known in San Diego for his days working as a DJ and musical director for 91X. His life is the subject of the new documentary film The Glamour and the Squalor, and it is primarily what he did while out of town that makes his story suitable for the big screen. In the early ’90s, Collins worked as a DJ at Seattle’s KNDD 107.7, “the End,” and was responsible for launching the careers of artists such as Weezer, the Foo Fighters, the Presidents of the United States of America, and, as he explains it, Beck.

“The record I’m most proud of being involved with is ‘Loser.’ We started playing that at the End from a 12-inch single when there were only one hundred of them. It was vinyl-only on a little label called Bong Load Records. A buddy of mine from L.A. sent it to me. Beck was their Silver Lake arty little busker,” Collins said. “That was one where the machine wasn’t in place yet, so I think that’s probably one of my proudest moments.”

So Collins broke some legendary bands and, because of this, actually became a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a DJ. But how was it that his life became the subject of a feature-length documentary?

“I didn’t know [the filmmakers] ahead of time, and when they first approached me, it was about a documentary about the Seattle music scene from 1991 to 1997, as seen through my eyes. Over about 12 hours of meetings in coffee shops, the story evolved, and they let me know that it was a little bit more about my life in the middle of this music revolution. It would focus more on this one individual in the middle of the scene.”

Collins continued, “It’s a strange thing because the movie’s not done, and I am nervous about seeing it. I’ve seen documentaries on other DJs that have been kind of sad and pathetic, and I just didn’t want this story to be that. I am not interested in working on something that would portray me as lame. I just wouldn’t sign on to it. So, we had to have a lot of talks, and I hired a great attorney.”

“I respect the fact that he took his time and did his homework before agreeing to it,” the film’s director Mark Evans told the Reader via email. “It took several three-hour meetings before we finally got it done. We had prepared the concept for several months before approaching him, and I think he appreciated that. Marco has such a unique story, being in the middle of a cultural revolution and being such an important figure for so many people in Seattle. He’s seen his peaks and valleys, and his biggest concern was how we would represent those valleys.”

Collins: “Courtney [Love] is one of the most powerful women I’ve ever met.”

The film is in production, and Collins’s anxiety levels regarding the project are raised.

“I am so critical about myself that we have a rule that I can’t watch it until the end,” Collins explained. “Until the final cut, but we’re still in edit mode. Hell, we’re still in filming mode, we’re filming Courtney Love tonight.”

Nervous?

“Yes, absolutely, but that’s the part I have to let go of. Courtney Love and I had a very tumultuous relationship. We had our ups and downs... In the end, I am a fan of hers and Kurt’s. I supported both of them. I am a bit nervous about what Courtney will say, but I don’t care. She’s said it all before, and I’ve let her say it on the air.... Courtney is one of the most powerful women I’ve ever met. She walks into a room and owns the room, and it can be scary and it can be totally magical. And that’s Courtney Love.”

The “squalor“ portion of the title refers to Collins’s history of substance abuse. He left 91X in 2006 to attend a rehab program in Georgia, and he hopes that the finished product gives people with similar struggles a tale they can identify with.

“The story is gritty and the story is real,” Collins said. “I had to come to terms with that because I have this vision of how I need to be, and that vision is more pure than I will probably ever be able to achieve. All of those things make me nervous, being me makes me nervous.”

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Fall equinox, smoggiest days, Chinese flame trees, Saturn and Jupiter near moon

Natural San Diego, September 21-28
Next Article

Not your father's Normal Heights

"All the neighbors came out and danced in the streets"
Former SD DJ Collins subject of rock doc The Glamour and the Squalor
Former SD DJ Collins subject of rock doc The Glamour and the Squalor

Marco Collins is probably best known in San Diego for his days working as a DJ and musical director for 91X. His life is the subject of the new documentary film The Glamour and the Squalor, and it is primarily what he did while out of town that makes his story suitable for the big screen. In the early ’90s, Collins worked as a DJ at Seattle’s KNDD 107.7, “the End,” and was responsible for launching the careers of artists such as Weezer, the Foo Fighters, the Presidents of the United States of America, and, as he explains it, Beck.

“The record I’m most proud of being involved with is ‘Loser.’ We started playing that at the End from a 12-inch single when there were only one hundred of them. It was vinyl-only on a little label called Bong Load Records. A buddy of mine from L.A. sent it to me. Beck was their Silver Lake arty little busker,” Collins said. “That was one where the machine wasn’t in place yet, so I think that’s probably one of my proudest moments.”

So Collins broke some legendary bands and, because of this, actually became a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a DJ. But how was it that his life became the subject of a feature-length documentary?

“I didn’t know [the filmmakers] ahead of time, and when they first approached me, it was about a documentary about the Seattle music scene from 1991 to 1997, as seen through my eyes. Over about 12 hours of meetings in coffee shops, the story evolved, and they let me know that it was a little bit more about my life in the middle of this music revolution. It would focus more on this one individual in the middle of the scene.”

Collins continued, “It’s a strange thing because the movie’s not done, and I am nervous about seeing it. I’ve seen documentaries on other DJs that have been kind of sad and pathetic, and I just didn’t want this story to be that. I am not interested in working on something that would portray me as lame. I just wouldn’t sign on to it. So, we had to have a lot of talks, and I hired a great attorney.”

“I respect the fact that he took his time and did his homework before agreeing to it,” the film’s director Mark Evans told the Reader via email. “It took several three-hour meetings before we finally got it done. We had prepared the concept for several months before approaching him, and I think he appreciated that. Marco has such a unique story, being in the middle of a cultural revolution and being such an important figure for so many people in Seattle. He’s seen his peaks and valleys, and his biggest concern was how we would represent those valleys.”

Collins: “Courtney [Love] is one of the most powerful women I’ve ever met.”

The film is in production, and Collins’s anxiety levels regarding the project are raised.

“I am so critical about myself that we have a rule that I can’t watch it until the end,” Collins explained. “Until the final cut, but we’re still in edit mode. Hell, we’re still in filming mode, we’re filming Courtney Love tonight.”

Nervous?

“Yes, absolutely, but that’s the part I have to let go of. Courtney Love and I had a very tumultuous relationship. We had our ups and downs... In the end, I am a fan of hers and Kurt’s. I supported both of them. I am a bit nervous about what Courtney will say, but I don’t care. She’s said it all before, and I’ve let her say it on the air.... Courtney is one of the most powerful women I’ve ever met. She walks into a room and owns the room, and it can be scary and it can be totally magical. And that’s Courtney Love.”

The “squalor“ portion of the title refers to Collins’s history of substance abuse. He left 91X in 2006 to attend a rehab program in Georgia, and he hopes that the finished product gives people with similar struggles a tale they can identify with.

“The story is gritty and the story is real,” Collins said. “I had to come to terms with that because I have this vision of how I need to be, and that vision is more pure than I will probably ever be able to achieve. All of those things make me nervous, being me makes me nervous.”

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Who will take over those Nordstroms?

Zoom's effect on San Diego's landscape
Next Article

Barbara Bry was right about motorized scooters

Todd Gloria was not
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close