Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Southeast Alaska: Craig and Klawock

Waterfront view of Alaskan peaks
Waterfront view of Alaskan peaks

You arrive at the Ketchikan Airport and quickly transfer to the Island Air Express counter. You excitedly secure your seatbelt and headphones inside the tiny nine-passenger aircraft. Within five minutes you’re soaring with the eagles over nameless snow-capped peaks, lush evergreen and a blatant lack of signs of population.

Seemingly uninhabited landscape stretches for what looks like forever. You think, perhaps this is what the rest of America was like at one time – perhaps this really is the final frontier.

You land at the Klawock/Craig airport. Your lodging options include the famous Fireweed Lodge in Klawock, Ruth Ann’s in Craig, or the secluded Northern Spell located on Wadleigh Island across the water. After choosing newbie Northern Spell, you are transported from floatplane to island in an open skiff. You march up the lodge’s steep dock and begin to curse the hour’s low tide, but are shortly interrupted when you catch a glimpse of the most grandeur display of stars you’ve ever seen.

Your wakeup call arrives at 4:30 a.m. The early bird catches the worm, they say – or in your case, the salmon. After the lodge fits you into some durable Xtratuf boots and fisherman overalls, you begin the pilgrimage every salmon-seeking city slicker must take. Your guide heads to Eleven Mile, where you patiently troll until the line finally pulls.

You begin to reel in what seems like a 70-pound beast. It’s an ongoing battle between man and fish, powered by sheer adrenaline. When he finally surfaces, you catch a glimpse of his silver scales. Maybe he’s no 70-pounder, but you love him just the same because he’s yours. He is netted and lands in the boat bottom with a loud thud.

Exhausted after a long day of fishing, you head home but make one last stop. The boat cruises past a lonely buoy out in the middle of the water. The buoy’s 100-foot rope is pulled until a metal cage surfaces. Seven Dungeness crabs and a single starfish – so fat from eating your catch that it’s spewing crabmeat – are visible. The crab trap is emptied and re-baited, the starfish and female crabs are returned to the sea, and the males are reserved for tonight’s dinner spread.

After a feast of Dungeness, king salmon and bull kelp martinis, you retire to bed feeling much like the starfish from earlier.

In the morning you’re awoken, and you load the aluminum dinghy. Today is sightseeing day, beginning with Canoe Point Falls, a 130-foot drop in the middle of a mossy, wooded forest. The next few hours are filled with krill-happy whales, mollusk-chomping sea otters, salmon-guzzling seal colonies and fish-in-talons eagles. Like a Thanksgiving that never ends, all tiers of the animal hierarchy feast constantly here.

At low tide, your guide makes a stop at a nearly submerged rock island. You’re thrown a five-gallon bucket and shovel and instructed to dig. The first fifteen minutes feel like unpaid labor. But you quickly abandon this idea when you strike gold. Mollusk gold, that is – clams. The burning sensation in your arm muscles lessens with each Walkman-sized clam you uncover. You, too, will feast like the sea otters tonight.

Before heading home you dock at Craig Harbor and venture through the "Golden Triangle." Named “triangle” after the town’s only three watering holes, all within 30 strides of one another, and “golden” perhaps after the color of the liquid in the bottles and glasses of loggers, fisherman and tourists alike, this area is the place for socializing or hell-raising, depending on the nightly level of testosterone.

Luckily, no fisherman vs. logger duels are in the mix tonight, and you’re free to roam between The Hill Bar, Ruth Ann’s and the Craig Inn without worrying that a barstool may going flying past at any moment. Post-cocktail you retire to the lodge for a meal of fresh steamed clams.

Stuffed, you sit relaxing under the star-studded sky by the fire on your last night in Alaska, wondering how you will return to the Lower 48 after this.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Luna Bay Booch's San Diego origin story

Woman owned hard kombucha brand brewed elsewhere, now sold locally
Waterfront view of Alaskan peaks
Waterfront view of Alaskan peaks

You arrive at the Ketchikan Airport and quickly transfer to the Island Air Express counter. You excitedly secure your seatbelt and headphones inside the tiny nine-passenger aircraft. Within five minutes you’re soaring with the eagles over nameless snow-capped peaks, lush evergreen and a blatant lack of signs of population.

Seemingly uninhabited landscape stretches for what looks like forever. You think, perhaps this is what the rest of America was like at one time – perhaps this really is the final frontier.

You land at the Klawock/Craig airport. Your lodging options include the famous Fireweed Lodge in Klawock, Ruth Ann’s in Craig, or the secluded Northern Spell located on Wadleigh Island across the water. After choosing newbie Northern Spell, you are transported from floatplane to island in an open skiff. You march up the lodge’s steep dock and begin to curse the hour’s low tide, but are shortly interrupted when you catch a glimpse of the most grandeur display of stars you’ve ever seen.

Your wakeup call arrives at 4:30 a.m. The early bird catches the worm, they say – or in your case, the salmon. After the lodge fits you into some durable Xtratuf boots and fisherman overalls, you begin the pilgrimage every salmon-seeking city slicker must take. Your guide heads to Eleven Mile, where you patiently troll until the line finally pulls.

You begin to reel in what seems like a 70-pound beast. It’s an ongoing battle between man and fish, powered by sheer adrenaline. When he finally surfaces, you catch a glimpse of his silver scales. Maybe he’s no 70-pounder, but you love him just the same because he’s yours. He is netted and lands in the boat bottom with a loud thud.

Exhausted after a long day of fishing, you head home but make one last stop. The boat cruises past a lonely buoy out in the middle of the water. The buoy’s 100-foot rope is pulled until a metal cage surfaces. Seven Dungeness crabs and a single starfish – so fat from eating your catch that it’s spewing crabmeat – are visible. The crab trap is emptied and re-baited, the starfish and female crabs are returned to the sea, and the males are reserved for tonight’s dinner spread.

After a feast of Dungeness, king salmon and bull kelp martinis, you retire to bed feeling much like the starfish from earlier.

In the morning you’re awoken, and you load the aluminum dinghy. Today is sightseeing day, beginning with Canoe Point Falls, a 130-foot drop in the middle of a mossy, wooded forest. The next few hours are filled with krill-happy whales, mollusk-chomping sea otters, salmon-guzzling seal colonies and fish-in-talons eagles. Like a Thanksgiving that never ends, all tiers of the animal hierarchy feast constantly here.

At low tide, your guide makes a stop at a nearly submerged rock island. You’re thrown a five-gallon bucket and shovel and instructed to dig. The first fifteen minutes feel like unpaid labor. But you quickly abandon this idea when you strike gold. Mollusk gold, that is – clams. The burning sensation in your arm muscles lessens with each Walkman-sized clam you uncover. You, too, will feast like the sea otters tonight.

Before heading home you dock at Craig Harbor and venture through the "Golden Triangle." Named “triangle” after the town’s only three watering holes, all within 30 strides of one another, and “golden” perhaps after the color of the liquid in the bottles and glasses of loggers, fisherman and tourists alike, this area is the place for socializing or hell-raising, depending on the nightly level of testosterone.

Luckily, no fisherman vs. logger duels are in the mix tonight, and you’re free to roam between The Hill Bar, Ruth Ann’s and the Craig Inn without worrying that a barstool may going flying past at any moment. Post-cocktail you retire to the lodge for a meal of fresh steamed clams.

Stuffed, you sit relaxing under the star-studded sky by the fire on your last night in Alaska, wondering how you will return to the Lower 48 after this.

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Luna Bay Booch's San Diego origin story

Woman owned hard kombucha brand brewed elsewhere, now sold locally
Next Article

The Tobacconist: Stogie story

His job is to sell pleasure and desire, cigars “hand-rolled tenderly by beautiful women on their thighs.”
Comments
1

Southeast Alaska sounds like the seafood mecca! Great article!

June 9, 2011

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close