Anchor ads are not supported on this page.

4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Dog Photography

A sole, fuzzy photo of our miniature schnauzer Nellie is all we have to remember her by. What were we thinking? We weren’t. So when gal-pal Bernice adopted a terrier, I insisted that she get professional shots taken of her furry bundle.

“I used to be a dog trainer,” said David Veit of David Veit Photography (619-847-8880; veitphotography.com). “I employ positive reinforcement and other dog-training principles in the session. The first 30 minutes is ‘getting to know you’ time. I employ the ‘click means treat’ method. But rather than using a traditional clicker, I use the shutter on my camera, so it teaches the dog to anticipate a reward, and I get the canine connected to the camera.”

A session starts at $200 and includes online proofing of the image and then delivery of that image as an 8x10. Sessions last up to 90 minutes. Veit works on location all around San Diego and has access to a studio if a client prefers.

John Cocozza of San Diego Dog Photography (858-952-9999; sandiegodogphotography.com) says, “Sometimes people want photos because they just got a new dog or they have some puppies that are getting a little bigger. But the majority of the time, it’s people who have a dog who is getting older, and they want to get some photos of them before the dog gets sick.”

Sponsored
Sponsored

Cocozza will go to the client’s home “if the dog is sick or older, and they can’t bring them to a park. But usually I’ll meet them at Ocean Beach’s dog beach [$80], Fiesta Island dog park [$80], Balboa Park dog park [$100], or Del Mar dog beach [$120].” Sessions are 45 minutes.

How is photographing people different than photographing dogs? “It’s very different. You can tell people to sit still. The reason I like shooting dogs is that it’s a challenge. You never know what the dog is going to do. When you let a dog go at a dog park, he’s all over the place, running around, sniffing all the other dogs — you really have to track him. I do surf photography and action-sports photography, so I’m used to that fast pace.”

What makes for a great shot? “When the dog looks at you, and he’s super intrigued by what you are doing. His ears go up, and he’s, like, What is that guy doing over there? I am going to go sniff that thing. Or when dogs are in action, when they first get down on the beach or the park and they start running around with the other dogs, then you can get a great action shot. Or if they are jumping in mid-air for a ball. The trick is not to force the dog. Let the dog be the dog, and you photograph what the dog is doing — instead of trying to pose the dog, force the dog. It’s never going to happen — the dog is too distracted.”

“I shoot photos in the animal’s home or a favorite location,” said Tamandra Michaels, owner of Heart Dog Studios (619-218-4668). “I take a variety of pictures, so they can choose between action shots, headshots, expression shots, and relationship shots. It can be documentary style...and there are some photos where I get their attention and interact with them. It’s modern photography, where I show the relationship between the animal and its people and capture the dog’s personality.”

Michaels charges $200; rescue-dog photos or terminally ill dogs are $150. “If people have rescued a dog, or if someone calls and books an emergency appointment for a terminally ill dog, I give them a break in the price.”

Other prices around town: Carla Seidlinger of Photographic Creations (619-462-4741; studiocarla.com) offers dog photography for $90, which includes an 8x10 portrait. If clients would like to take their dog to a shooting location, she charges $125.

FurBaby (619-523-8614, aquariostudio.com) offers $49 photo sessions for a half hour at the beach or in their studio in Ocean Beach.

The latest copy of the Reader

Please enjoy this clickable Reader flipbook. Linked text and ads are flash-highlighted in blue for your convenience. To enhance your viewing, please open full screen mode by clicking the icon on the far right of the black flipbook toolbar.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Gonzo Report: A game of psilocybin roulette at Xavier Rudd’s show

Getting shifted before the show at Humphreys
Next Article

German Cultural Minister tried to cancel Wagner

Wagner doesn't appeal to the young because he makes too many demands

A sole, fuzzy photo of our miniature schnauzer Nellie is all we have to remember her by. What were we thinking? We weren’t. So when gal-pal Bernice adopted a terrier, I insisted that she get professional shots taken of her furry bundle.

“I used to be a dog trainer,” said David Veit of David Veit Photography (619-847-8880; veitphotography.com). “I employ positive reinforcement and other dog-training principles in the session. The first 30 minutes is ‘getting to know you’ time. I employ the ‘click means treat’ method. But rather than using a traditional clicker, I use the shutter on my camera, so it teaches the dog to anticipate a reward, and I get the canine connected to the camera.”

A session starts at $200 and includes online proofing of the image and then delivery of that image as an 8x10. Sessions last up to 90 minutes. Veit works on location all around San Diego and has access to a studio if a client prefers.

John Cocozza of San Diego Dog Photography (858-952-9999; sandiegodogphotography.com) says, “Sometimes people want photos because they just got a new dog or they have some puppies that are getting a little bigger. But the majority of the time, it’s people who have a dog who is getting older, and they want to get some photos of them before the dog gets sick.”

Sponsored
Sponsored

Cocozza will go to the client’s home “if the dog is sick or older, and they can’t bring them to a park. But usually I’ll meet them at Ocean Beach’s dog beach [$80], Fiesta Island dog park [$80], Balboa Park dog park [$100], or Del Mar dog beach [$120].” Sessions are 45 minutes.

How is photographing people different than photographing dogs? “It’s very different. You can tell people to sit still. The reason I like shooting dogs is that it’s a challenge. You never know what the dog is going to do. When you let a dog go at a dog park, he’s all over the place, running around, sniffing all the other dogs — you really have to track him. I do surf photography and action-sports photography, so I’m used to that fast pace.”

What makes for a great shot? “When the dog looks at you, and he’s super intrigued by what you are doing. His ears go up, and he’s, like, What is that guy doing over there? I am going to go sniff that thing. Or when dogs are in action, when they first get down on the beach or the park and they start running around with the other dogs, then you can get a great action shot. Or if they are jumping in mid-air for a ball. The trick is not to force the dog. Let the dog be the dog, and you photograph what the dog is doing — instead of trying to pose the dog, force the dog. It’s never going to happen — the dog is too distracted.”

“I shoot photos in the animal’s home or a favorite location,” said Tamandra Michaels, owner of Heart Dog Studios (619-218-4668). “I take a variety of pictures, so they can choose between action shots, headshots, expression shots, and relationship shots. It can be documentary style...and there are some photos where I get their attention and interact with them. It’s modern photography, where I show the relationship between the animal and its people and capture the dog’s personality.”

Michaels charges $200; rescue-dog photos or terminally ill dogs are $150. “If people have rescued a dog, or if someone calls and books an emergency appointment for a terminally ill dog, I give them a break in the price.”

Other prices around town: Carla Seidlinger of Photographic Creations (619-462-4741; studiocarla.com) offers dog photography for $90, which includes an 8x10 portrait. If clients would like to take their dog to a shooting location, she charges $125.

FurBaby (619-523-8614, aquariostudio.com) offers $49 photo sessions for a half hour at the beach or in their studio in Ocean Beach.

Comments
Sponsored

The latest copy of the Reader

Please enjoy this clickable Reader flipbook. Linked text and ads are flash-highlighted in blue for your convenience. To enhance your viewing, please open full screen mode by clicking the icon on the far right of the black flipbook toolbar.

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Todd Gloria and developers to Hillcrest and University City: Sucks to be you

163 will be more congested, but people will adjust
Next Article

San Diego mega homeless shelter at Kettner and Vine bumps along

Building's owner Douglas Hamm thinks it's "perfect"
Comments
Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories Fishing Report — What’s getting hooked from ship and shore From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town The Gonzo Report — Making the musical scene, or at least reporting from it Letters — Our inbox Movies@Home — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Theater — On stage in San Diego this week Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close

Anchor ads are not supported on this page.

This Week’s Reader This Week’s Reader