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Goat Canyon Trestle Trek

Tucked away in the southern end of the Anza-Borrego Desert is an engineering marvel that, due to its remoteness, has only been viewed by a relatively small number of people.

The Goat Canyon trestle was built in 1932 after an earthquake collapsed one of the tunnels of the Carrizo Gorge section of the San Diego and Arizona Railway. At 200 feet tall and 750 feet long, it remains to this day the longest, tallest curved wooden trestle ever built in the United States.

The ruggedness of the mountainous terrain as well as the searing desert temperatures warranted the name "The Impossible Railroad." The preferred route is to park near Mortero Palms; take the trail that leads you up and over the Jacumba Mountains, dropping you down into Goat Canyon after three miles or so. This is pretty much the standard route and is published in a few hiking books and on a few websites.

While we have hiked out to the Goat Canyon trestle along the "popular route," I have always had it in the back of my mind to park at the north end of Carrizo Gorge and then hike up to where it intersects Goat Canyon. Mary and I tried it once a couple years ago and eventually gave up. There is no clearly defined trail up the gorge, and a majority of the hike had us dodging cholla, hopscotching across river rocks, and squeezing through cat-claw. Still, I was itching to do it and Mary agreed to accompany me.

Saturday morning, we loaded up the Land Cruiser, slapped on the sunscreen, and drove out to meet up with Daren at the Carrizo Creek turnoff. After quick introductions, we hopped in our vehicles and lumbered up the Carrizo Gorge jeep road. The trail was deserted, except for a few jackrabbits, and after an hour of bouncing up the trail we parked and hiked into the gorge.

Now, I am usually not one to worry about rattlesnakes, but the combination of the thick undergrowth and Daren's rattlesnake stories had me a bit spooked. Suddenly, the stillness of the desert was interrupted by a loud, piercing rattle. No, these weren't maracas, but a four- to five-foot-long diamondback rattler coiled up into strike position. We quickly detoured off the trail and continued deeper into the gorge, vowing to pay better attention to our steps.

A couple miles into the hike, we realized we were not covering as much ground as we had hoped. By our calculations, the Goat Canyon juncture was still a couple hours away, and the sun had already moved directly overhead. At this point, we made the decision to bushwhack up the side of the mountain, using the train tracks as our goal. We made our way up the loose material, sweating, cursing, and dodging cholla until we finally arrived at the tracks of the Carrizo Gorge railway.

From here the hike was easy since we merely had to follow the tracks for about another mile and a half. Along the way we passed through two-story-tall tunnels that had been blasted out of solid rock and are supported with massive wooden beams. Further down the tracks we passed by some old boxcars perched on the edge of the gorge. After a bit more hiking, we found ourselves standing in the middle of the 200-foot-high Goat Canyon trestle.

Looking west, down into Goat Canyon, we realized the approach from Carrizo Gorge would have been all but impossible. There is a towering dry waterfall at the mouth of the canyon that looks deceptively easy on Google Earth. Our view from high atop the trestle said otherwise.

We explored the trestle area for some time until hunger eventually got the best of us. Far off in Carrizo Gorge was a Land Cruiser with cold beer and sandwiches, so we reluctantly started our long journey back.

Originally posted on anzaborrego.net

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Tucked away in the southern end of the Anza-Borrego Desert is an engineering marvel that, due to its remoteness, has only been viewed by a relatively small number of people.

The Goat Canyon trestle was built in 1932 after an earthquake collapsed one of the tunnels of the Carrizo Gorge section of the San Diego and Arizona Railway. At 200 feet tall and 750 feet long, it remains to this day the longest, tallest curved wooden trestle ever built in the United States.

The ruggedness of the mountainous terrain as well as the searing desert temperatures warranted the name "The Impossible Railroad." The preferred route is to park near Mortero Palms; take the trail that leads you up and over the Jacumba Mountains, dropping you down into Goat Canyon after three miles or so. This is pretty much the standard route and is published in a few hiking books and on a few websites.

While we have hiked out to the Goat Canyon trestle along the "popular route," I have always had it in the back of my mind to park at the north end of Carrizo Gorge and then hike up to where it intersects Goat Canyon. Mary and I tried it once a couple years ago and eventually gave up. There is no clearly defined trail up the gorge, and a majority of the hike had us dodging cholla, hopscotching across river rocks, and squeezing through cat-claw. Still, I was itching to do it and Mary agreed to accompany me.

Saturday morning, we loaded up the Land Cruiser, slapped on the sunscreen, and drove out to meet up with Daren at the Carrizo Creek turnoff. After quick introductions, we hopped in our vehicles and lumbered up the Carrizo Gorge jeep road. The trail was deserted, except for a few jackrabbits, and after an hour of bouncing up the trail we parked and hiked into the gorge.

Now, I am usually not one to worry about rattlesnakes, but the combination of the thick undergrowth and Daren's rattlesnake stories had me a bit spooked. Suddenly, the stillness of the desert was interrupted by a loud, piercing rattle. No, these weren't maracas, but a four- to five-foot-long diamondback rattler coiled up into strike position. We quickly detoured off the trail and continued deeper into the gorge, vowing to pay better attention to our steps.

A couple miles into the hike, we realized we were not covering as much ground as we had hoped. By our calculations, the Goat Canyon juncture was still a couple hours away, and the sun had already moved directly overhead. At this point, we made the decision to bushwhack up the side of the mountain, using the train tracks as our goal. We made our way up the loose material, sweating, cursing, and dodging cholla until we finally arrived at the tracks of the Carrizo Gorge railway.

From here the hike was easy since we merely had to follow the tracks for about another mile and a half. Along the way we passed through two-story-tall tunnels that had been blasted out of solid rock and are supported with massive wooden beams. Further down the tracks we passed by some old boxcars perched on the edge of the gorge. After a bit more hiking, we found ourselves standing in the middle of the 200-foot-high Goat Canyon trestle.

Looking west, down into Goat Canyon, we realized the approach from Carrizo Gorge would have been all but impossible. There is a towering dry waterfall at the mouth of the canyon that looks deceptively easy on Google Earth. Our view from high atop the trestle said otherwise.

We explored the trestle area for some time until hunger eventually got the best of us. Far off in Carrizo Gorge was a Land Cruiser with cold beer and sandwiches, so we reluctantly started our long journey back.

Originally posted on anzaborrego.net

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Comments
9

OOOOOhhhhhh....That picture turns me on!........am I sick?

May 29, 2010

RIGHT? I was going to just comment that it looks like a bikini bottom and you beat me to it!! And I'm a girl!!

May 29, 2010

years ago we mountain biked Goat Canyon Trestle. Much easier to access although not entirely legal. It really is a little known San Diego county treasure.

May 29, 2010

A buddy and I have tackled the approach to Goat Canyon several times. The easiest was to walk the track from Carrizo Creek, although getting to the tracks was no easy feat. We also tried coming in from above: Found a dirt road that ran in the general area; parked as close as we could, but it was still a good mile or so to the top of Goat Canyon, and then the descent went well until we were about 500 yards above the bridge and could not find a safe path to follow the rest of the way. The drop was way too steep and we weren't prepared to do any serious rock climbing--especially when we weren't sure we could get back up. We knew it would be a very long walk back to the car if we didn't exit the canyon the same way we went in, so we snapped some shots and headed back. But the bridge is really something to see. It's too bad they don't offer a ride on the tracks for the public like they did for Hewell whatshisname when he did a "California Gold" show on the trip to the bridge a few years ago. Incidentally, I'm pretty sure being on the tracks is illegal and you can get cited if the RR company man catches you. The other approach straight up Carrizo Creek, taking the turn-off at Goat Canyon is a killer. I suggest the outlaw route.

May 30, 2010

Javajoe25 Are you talking about the route from Mortero palms where you go up and over the mountian and then drop down into Goat Canyon? I have done that one a few times and you are right the last 500 feet is pretty sketchy. You can make it to the bottom if you go slow and watch your footing. Bob

May 31, 2010

Beautiful picture. That valley is one of my favorites to fly over with a tourist in the right seat of a light aircraft. There are about a half dozen trestles and a dozen tunnels. You cannot imagine what those workers from Conservation Corps went through digging that railway to nowhere. And for $1 a day!

Glad it's guarded and protected. Did you see the security? They are there. As are USBP censors and if you trigger them, you'll be visited by a helo or ground unit.

June 2, 2010

Never saw security whole tim e we were there. Guess we were lucky.

I have some pictures of the trip at

http://www.anzaborrego.net/travel/AnzaBorrego/photoalbums/GoatCanyonTrestle_2010.aspx

If the link doesn't work go to http://www.anzaborrego.net/ and search Goat Canyon Trestle Bob

June 2, 2010

1

sick ...hahahahaha...i don't know... squirrelicious ...YEP!!!

July 15, 2010

That photo was priceless.

July 15, 2010

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