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IKEA by Bus

On Tuesday evening, Heather Werdick, a transportation planner for San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG), presented the agency's draft 2050 Regional Transportation Plan to the Community Planning Committee, a group of planning chairpersons from neighborhoods throughout San Diego.

Federal mandates require SANDAG to update the transportation plan every four years. The upcoming 2050 Regional Transportation Plan will be released in July 2011 after SANDAG gets feedback from the public. The purpose of the plan is to develop a strategy for future public-transit projects throughout the county's urban areas as well as to tie development patterns in to existing and future transportation projects. The plan also includes elements from Senate Bill 375, which places greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction targets for vehicles.

During the presentation, Werdick presented a graph that showed the population growth that SANDAG projects for the county. By 2050 SANDAG forecasts an additional 1.2 million people will take up residence in the county, 400,000 new housing units will be built, and 500,000 new jobs will be created.

Werdick went on to explain some of the ideas for transportation in the coming decades. Most of the plans focused on mass transit: extended light rail lines, a new high-speed rail line from Riverside and Los Angeles counties ending at Lindbergh Field, and additional bus transit lines around urban areas and transit corridors. During the presentation, little was mentioned about automobiles and freeways.

"I call this plan the bus, trolley, street car, and railroad plan. It is not a transportation plan," said Guy Preuss, chair of the Skyline-Paradise Hills planning group. "It's quite obvious that there's a need for a third freeway between [Interstate 5] and [Interstate 15]. Why highways aren't on the table when you're talking about transportation is beyond me. [SANDAG] is developing a plan where the communities have to support transportation."

Committee member Jim Varnedore, the planning chair for City Heights, agreed. "Transit is put in places where there are lots of people, which changes zoning so that construction can go in...so that more people can go in."

"Automobiles will be the major transportation mode in the future," said Community Planning Committee chair, Leo Wilson. "You're not going to go to IKEA to buy a table or a lamp on a bus. It won't happen."

Werdick responded to the concerns by assuring the planning chairs that SANDAG is also updating bicycle, highway, and freight networks. "We are still in the beginning of updating our plan."

For more on SANDAG's 2050 Regional Transportation Plan visit sandag.org.

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On Tuesday evening, Heather Werdick, a transportation planner for San Diego Association of Governments (SANDAG), presented the agency's draft 2050 Regional Transportation Plan to the Community Planning Committee, a group of planning chairpersons from neighborhoods throughout San Diego.

Federal mandates require SANDAG to update the transportation plan every four years. The upcoming 2050 Regional Transportation Plan will be released in July 2011 after SANDAG gets feedback from the public. The purpose of the plan is to develop a strategy for future public-transit projects throughout the county's urban areas as well as to tie development patterns in to existing and future transportation projects. The plan also includes elements from Senate Bill 375, which places greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction targets for vehicles.

During the presentation, Werdick presented a graph that showed the population growth that SANDAG projects for the county. By 2050 SANDAG forecasts an additional 1.2 million people will take up residence in the county, 400,000 new housing units will be built, and 500,000 new jobs will be created.

Werdick went on to explain some of the ideas for transportation in the coming decades. Most of the plans focused on mass transit: extended light rail lines, a new high-speed rail line from Riverside and Los Angeles counties ending at Lindbergh Field, and additional bus transit lines around urban areas and transit corridors. During the presentation, little was mentioned about automobiles and freeways.

"I call this plan the bus, trolley, street car, and railroad plan. It is not a transportation plan," said Guy Preuss, chair of the Skyline-Paradise Hills planning group. "It's quite obvious that there's a need for a third freeway between [Interstate 5] and [Interstate 15]. Why highways aren't on the table when you're talking about transportation is beyond me. [SANDAG] is developing a plan where the communities have to support transportation."

Committee member Jim Varnedore, the planning chair for City Heights, agreed. "Transit is put in places where there are lots of people, which changes zoning so that construction can go in...so that more people can go in."

"Automobiles will be the major transportation mode in the future," said Community Planning Committee chair, Leo Wilson. "You're not going to go to IKEA to buy a table or a lamp on a bus. It won't happen."

Werdick responded to the concerns by assuring the planning chairs that SANDAG is also updating bicycle, highway, and freight networks. "We are still in the beginning of updating our plan."

For more on SANDAG's 2050 Regional Transportation Plan visit sandag.org.

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Comments
7

SANDAG' 2050 RTP has one (1) MAJOR assumption that is directing their Entire Planning effort that I don't agree with! Here is their "Big One": Where are the million + "new" people going to live that will be living in San Diego in 2050?

  1. I'm thinking that the actual number will be much much less, maybe even as low as 10% of that number. Also, by 2050 is a date so far away that all the Planners working on this issue will be retired and probably be long gone from SD by then! In reality, this is just a great make work project for all our local Planners, Consultants and their Staff to keep real busy, during these really tough economic times...

  2. I also believe that in our very near future, San Diego will be a very expensive place to live (think a big Coronado, La Jolla or Del Mar) and those folks that do continue to live here will be rich, retired, already own here or all three. The folks struggling to make a living that "would like to live here" are not going to be able to afford to live in San Diego itself, but they will be able to afford to live EAST OF SAN DIEGO, and I do not mean El Cajon. One high tech train line that allows folks living West of the Salton Sea to commute at high speed into San Diego would be a major game changer for our entire Area, and probably be much cheaper to fund than adding additional highway lanes to our existing crowded system if they have to remove housing to do it!

I know that the City of San Diego is lusting after an increased tax base but I believe that it's residents are now getting smart about all the problems caused by DENSITY (no matter how well it is planned) and will resist all major changes that will degrade their quality of life. If San Diego stays like San Diego is now instead of morphing into another crowded Orange County our property values will continue to sky rocket instead of just wallow, as we become "overbuilt", "over crowded" and "Blighted" by new high rise infill projects located along linear transportation corridors...

May 27, 2010

Eventually, if we build enough freeways, enough homes will be condemned and torn down that we won't need more freeways.

We won't need any new freeways at all if Meg becomes governor, as everything we need will be available on EBay. Of course, state sales tax revenues on un-taxed Internet sales could fall to zero...

May 27, 2010

The City of San Diego is LU$TING for more money!

Here is their "game plan" on how to get it (if we let them): 1. Increase Density, which will cause older owners to sell. 2. New owners = folks paying higher property Taxes. 3. More Density = more tax payers = More $ paid in taxes! 4. More new folks = No sense of Broken City Improvement Promises! 5. Future "$hortages" = much higher City Utilities income %. 6. Promoting that the City is "poor" = LE$$ expenditures & More excuses. 7. Dump Density on "Transportation Corridors" (NO Wealthy areas) = $upport 8. Get their Planning Folks to make even more "improvements".

The BE$T solution for ALL Residents is just to $AY No!

May 27, 2010

People do take the bus to Ikea all the time in New York. It is so lucrative, Ikea runs the service for free. I had to wait for three full busses one time to get from Manhattan to Elizabeth. I even hauled back four dining room chairs on the bus and subway. I realize San Diego is not Manhattan, but I bet you would be surprised by the number who use the trolley to access Ikea and Costco at the Fenton Parkway stop and what they haul back on the trolley.

http://www.ikea.com/us/en/store/elizabeth

May 28, 2010

What's the point of wanting all these streets and freeways anyhow? There's no parking when you get where you're going--not at your condo, the restaurant, or any place else. Just ask Uptown Parking. Parking is a thing of the past.

May 29, 2010

"What's the point of wanting all these streets and freeways anyhow?"

Here on Imperial Avenue heading out of Encantostan, it's premier low-budget drag racing. After all, they make skateboard parks for the kiddies...

May 29, 2010

a2resource, you are perfectly right. It is FUN to cruise around, particularly if you have a convertible and the top works. I didn't even think of the drag racing. I stand corrected.

May 30, 2010

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