4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Instrumental Trip

Primitive Noyes describes their music as “electroniscape pop.” The band’s sound is redolent of those 1960s-era anti-drug films intended to scare junior high school kids away from dope. To wit: “One senses the invocation of an alternate reality, ephemeral imaginings animating the void,” a concertgoer wrote on a Reader blog after witnessing a show in June.

Their music envelopes a listener in rich and meditative instrumental excursions that include the bowing of bass guitars, digital sampling, looping, and the buzz of controlled feedback. But it’s a warm buzz. So much of pop electronica can sound frigid and nervous. A listen to Primitive Noyes may at times be an act of waiting for something to happen, but at least it’s a pleasant wait. The band has released one CD, Ideation — “as in the process of having an idea.”

Primitive Noyes started in San Diego in 2009 and performs at Whistle Stop, Soda Bar, Ruby Room, and Tin Can Ale House. They are Jordan Hammond, Glendon Romett, Shannon St. John, and Jamal Smith. Jordan Hammond answered the questions below.

What are you guys working on now?

“Not going crazy with the BS of real life, balancing this multiple-way marriage of a band, and figuring out how to respect each other. Also, a bunch of gear broke all at once, so we gotta handle that.”

What is the hardest part of being in this band?

“Persistence. It’s hard even when you know the value of persistence. To get the best work out of yourself, it seems like you have to be singularly focused. But even when you do your best work, the fact is you are only background music in a club for people to drink their Newcastles to.”

Have you guys ever played a wedding gig?

“Nope. We’ll play yours, though.”

How did this band come about?

“A few folks wanted to play music together and work on it really hard without using anything outside ourselves as the judge of quality.”

Who writes your material?

“No one. It turns out it was already written. We just need to shut up our dumb thoughts and find it.”

There was a story in the Wall Street Journal a few months ago that said that all the good band names had been taken...

The Wall Street Journal is wrong. There are echelons of creativity yet to be explored, ones that will exist long after we are dead. I really like our band name. It slowly developed in the same manner we write. Then it solidified itself, and now we stand by it.”

Do you get pre-show jitters?

“We just promise ourselves that we’ll give it all we got every time we play I guess, try to not look back, try to not think. Maybe practice more? I don’t know. I still get them.”

What was your favorite song to write?

“The process is always so different. Our finished songs are more an attempt to express the powerfully moving creative experiences we get to have when we are focused and responding to each other, musically or not. We get to rewrite the songs every time we play them. It’s kind of empowering, and it’s kind of intimidating, but I think that means we are on the right path.”

The 12 most-essential musicians or bands of all time?

1) Boards of Canada

2) Bear in Heaven

3) Godspeed You! Black Emperor

4) Do Make Say Think

5) Radiohead

6) Miles Davis

7) Django Reinhardt

8) Sigur Rós

9) Mono

10) Neutral Milk Hotel

11) PJ Harvey

12) Cat Power ■

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Nathan Hubbard returns to La Cage aux Folles

“We’re downstairs in the pit”
Next Article

Little apes on a little rock in a sea of nothingness

Scoobert Doobert, Sorry It’s Over, Nortec Collective, Stephen Pearcy, Mrs. Henry

Primitive Noyes describes their music as “electroniscape pop.” The band’s sound is redolent of those 1960s-era anti-drug films intended to scare junior high school kids away from dope. To wit: “One senses the invocation of an alternate reality, ephemeral imaginings animating the void,” a concertgoer wrote on a Reader blog after witnessing a show in June.

Their music envelopes a listener in rich and meditative instrumental excursions that include the bowing of bass guitars, digital sampling, looping, and the buzz of controlled feedback. But it’s a warm buzz. So much of pop electronica can sound frigid and nervous. A listen to Primitive Noyes may at times be an act of waiting for something to happen, but at least it’s a pleasant wait. The band has released one CD, Ideation — “as in the process of having an idea.”

Primitive Noyes started in San Diego in 2009 and performs at Whistle Stop, Soda Bar, Ruby Room, and Tin Can Ale House. They are Jordan Hammond, Glendon Romett, Shannon St. John, and Jamal Smith. Jordan Hammond answered the questions below.

What are you guys working on now?

“Not going crazy with the BS of real life, balancing this multiple-way marriage of a band, and figuring out how to respect each other. Also, a bunch of gear broke all at once, so we gotta handle that.”

What is the hardest part of being in this band?

“Persistence. It’s hard even when you know the value of persistence. To get the best work out of yourself, it seems like you have to be singularly focused. But even when you do your best work, the fact is you are only background music in a club for people to drink their Newcastles to.”

Have you guys ever played a wedding gig?

“Nope. We’ll play yours, though.”

How did this band come about?

“A few folks wanted to play music together and work on it really hard without using anything outside ourselves as the judge of quality.”

Who writes your material?

“No one. It turns out it was already written. We just need to shut up our dumb thoughts and find it.”

There was a story in the Wall Street Journal a few months ago that said that all the good band names had been taken...

The Wall Street Journal is wrong. There are echelons of creativity yet to be explored, ones that will exist long after we are dead. I really like our band name. It slowly developed in the same manner we write. Then it solidified itself, and now we stand by it.”

Do you get pre-show jitters?

“We just promise ourselves that we’ll give it all we got every time we play I guess, try to not look back, try to not think. Maybe practice more? I don’t know. I still get them.”

What was your favorite song to write?

“The process is always so different. Our finished songs are more an attempt to express the powerfully moving creative experiences we get to have when we are focused and responding to each other, musically or not. We get to rewrite the songs every time we play them. It’s kind of empowering, and it’s kind of intimidating, but I think that means we are on the right path.”

The 12 most-essential musicians or bands of all time?

1) Boards of Canada

2) Bear in Heaven

3) Godspeed You! Black Emperor

4) Do Make Say Think

5) Radiohead

6) Miles Davis

7) Django Reinhardt

8) Sigur Rós

9) Mono

10) Neutral Milk Hotel

11) PJ Harvey

12) Cat Power ■

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Guadalupe Valley draws the line at an amphitheater

"They will leave us a ghost town”
Next Article

T. E. Hulme: an influence on Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot and Robert Frost

Six poems from the first Modernist poet
Comments
1

If you want to get the last album, www.primitivenoyes.com has it for free download/donation.

Aug. 26, 2010

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Drinks All Around — Bartenders' drink recipes Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Outdoors — Weekly changes in flora and fauna Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Street Style — San Diego streets have style Surf Diego — Real stories from those braving the waves Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close