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More Meter Management

A year has elapsed since Mayor Sanders last pushed the Parking Utilization Plan, an initiative to increase parking rates and extend hours of enforcement of the city's parking meters.

In Hillcrest, residents and business owners blasted the plan, thinking higher rates would drive people away from local business and restaurants and steer them to areas where free parking is available.

In May 2009, Uptown Planners, the community-planning group for Hillcrest, Banker’s Hill, University Heights, and Mission Hills, rejected the parking plan by a 10 to 3 vote. One month later, the Hillcrest Business Association voted to remove Hillcrest from the list of neighborhoods included in the initiative.

The Parking Utitlization Plan has returned. On April 1, Meredith Dibden-Brown from the Office of Small Business sent an email to community representatives in North Park, Hillcrest, University Heights, and Kensington, informing them that new studies are on the way, studies that may be used to increase the number of parking meters in the city.

According to Dibden-Brown's April 1 email, the intent of the parking studies, which are paid for by Community Parking District funds and revenues from parking meters, is to "determine the impact of parking within the parking meter impact zones upon the areas adjacent but outside of the [current] zones...and if parking meters should or may be installed in areas outside but adjacent to the parking impact zones."

Dibden-Brown's email also mentioned the future purchase of new meters in the community parking districts. The new meters, each one costing approximately $500, take credit cards and are powered by solar energy. They will also give the city the power to adjust rates and extend hours of enforcement by way of remote programming.

"If you don't budget it now but have a reserve, then when and if we go to council with a proposal on new-technology single-space meters, we could include a change to your plans as part of that action," Dibden-Brown informed parking district managers.

The correspondence did not go unnoticed. In an email, Uptown Planners chair Leo Wilson warned residents that the initiative was back.

"I have been informed that the Parking Meter Utilization proposal, with the potential of increased parking meter rates and hours, is going to the city council in several months as a possible means for the city to increase its revenue."

The new meter technology will be heard at a future Public Safety and Neighborhood Committee meeting.

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A year has elapsed since Mayor Sanders last pushed the Parking Utilization Plan, an initiative to increase parking rates and extend hours of enforcement of the city's parking meters.

In Hillcrest, residents and business owners blasted the plan, thinking higher rates would drive people away from local business and restaurants and steer them to areas where free parking is available.

In May 2009, Uptown Planners, the community-planning group for Hillcrest, Banker’s Hill, University Heights, and Mission Hills, rejected the parking plan by a 10 to 3 vote. One month later, the Hillcrest Business Association voted to remove Hillcrest from the list of neighborhoods included in the initiative.

The Parking Utitlization Plan has returned. On April 1, Meredith Dibden-Brown from the Office of Small Business sent an email to community representatives in North Park, Hillcrest, University Heights, and Kensington, informing them that new studies are on the way, studies that may be used to increase the number of parking meters in the city.

According to Dibden-Brown's April 1 email, the intent of the parking studies, which are paid for by Community Parking District funds and revenues from parking meters, is to "determine the impact of parking within the parking meter impact zones upon the areas adjacent but outside of the [current] zones...and if parking meters should or may be installed in areas outside but adjacent to the parking impact zones."

Dibden-Brown's email also mentioned the future purchase of new meters in the community parking districts. The new meters, each one costing approximately $500, take credit cards and are powered by solar energy. They will also give the city the power to adjust rates and extend hours of enforcement by way of remote programming.

"If you don't budget it now but have a reserve, then when and if we go to council with a proposal on new-technology single-space meters, we could include a change to your plans as part of that action," Dibden-Brown informed parking district managers.

The correspondence did not go unnoticed. In an email, Uptown Planners chair Leo Wilson warned residents that the initiative was back.

"I have been informed that the Parking Meter Utilization proposal, with the potential of increased parking meter rates and hours, is going to the city council in several months as a possible means for the city to increase its revenue."

The new meter technology will be heard at a future Public Safety and Neighborhood Committee meeting.

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Comments
2

Oh my Lord, please no more parking meter rate hikes!!!

Don't the powers-that-be downtown realize that a great deal of official business has to be conducted downtown at City Hall, at the Courthouse, at Social Security, at the Federal building, at the County Jail, by people who may not have barrels of money at their disposal and that have to park at meters????

I just wrote about this in a thread I posted yesterday, that I literally ran out of quarters while waiting hours at the Social Security offices downtown, and fully expected to find a ticket on my car when I left the building. Fortunately, I didn't get a ticket, but geez Louise, the City gets you coming and going!!!!

April 7, 2010

The City of San Diego needs to totally rethink it's City Parking "Plan" as it is outdated and poorly administered, most often without respect for Residents.

Consider these examples:

  1. Since the folks that work as "Meter Officers" generate much more income than it costs to pay them why does meter enforcement end at 6 PM? This does nothing to enforce late night parking problems.

  2. Why should a Residential Parking District take years to implement, unless the City really does not want them? What is wrong with that picture?

  3. Why should residents have to pay huge sums for low cost decals to the City in a parking district just to get some relief from Business Patron parking in their own neighborhoods? Instead, why not have the Business's that are causing the parking problems pay all sticker costs. Fair is Fair, Homeowners should not have to "pick up the tab" for Business Owners Parking!

  4. Why should homeowners have to move their vehicles every 72 hours, just to park in the same spot in front of their own home? This also causes "stupid" pollution which SANDAG must correct in SB 375.

  5. If business's want "grow" why should they get to without paying to mitigate the effects on nearby Residents BEFORE THEY OPEN THEIR DOORS?

  6. If you think parking is poor now, wait until the City adopts "in lieu" fees that allow businesses without enough parking to pay a fee instead of providing parking! Then the City will be able to spend the money somewhere sometime BUT it does nothing to reduce the Parking Blight for the Residents that live nearby...

  7. 100% of all the Revenue from all Parking tickets should NOT be put into the General Fund but rather used to fund bonds and build new parking structures; that way we will build solutions to our Parking Blight instead of making it much worse... while telling all "non rich" folks to use mass transit...

April 16, 2010

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