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Second Worst

Downtown San Diego
Downtown San Diego

Author: Sandra Keener

Neighborhood: Downtown

Age: 60

Occupation: Retired

Well, there it was last summer for all to see and read, an article in Forbes entitled ­“America’s Worst Cities to Be a Sports Fan.” It stated: “Lining up behind Miami for the booby prize [is] San Diego ($300 a game for a family of four).”

The article noted a Chargers and Padres combined winning percentage of .425 (26th place “among 29 major sports metros”). The study was limited to the four major sports franchises, cities with at least two teams. The cost for a family of four to attend a Padres game was calculated based on the prices of four tickets, two small beers, four small sodas, four hot dogs, parking, two programs, and two inexpensive team caps (in San Diego?).

In other words, San Diegans cannot really afford to go see the Padres or Chargers ­play.

I hope Padres owner Mr. Moores and soon-to-be Padres owner Mr. Moorad saw this article. Do they

know how it feels to be a fan and read such an article? Do they now know that San Diego sports spectators rank as the second-worst fortunate in the ­nation?

Now that it is in print for all to see, Mr. Ballweg, Padres VP of sales, you ­don’t need to take our word for it. Now everybody knows we pay way, way too much for the pleasure of seeing games in San Diego. This can be fixed. You can work your way out of the top ten “worst.” It is simple: lower the ­prices.

After this blog was posted to the Reader website, the Padres announced a 25 percent price reduction of some tickets for the 2009 season and a “value meal” (hot dog, regular soda, peanuts, popcorn, and a cookie) for $5.

San Diego: Building, Building, Building

I was wandering around the internet, looking for information on “affordable” housing in San Diego. I noticed a news article on the proposed senior center at Beech Street and Fourth Avenue. This is the opening paragraph: “DOWNTOWN SAN DIEGO — A ­charity’s plan to create a cutting-edge senior center in downtown San Diego is faltering because the ­city’s downtown redevelopment agency wants to see a bigger building there ­instead.”

Will everyone who wants another high-rise building in San Diego please raise their hands? ­Aren’t there enough vacant condos, empty commercial spaces, and lack of affordable housing to make someone stop and think? I realize that the Centre City Development Corporation and friends are supposed to have some expertise in redevelopment and that I am merely one voice that sees things from the perspective of a downtown resident, but someone needs to speak up. Those who know me are probably laughing because here I am, speaking ­up!

There is another project proposal for the southeast corner of Broadway and Ninth Avenue. A 16-story building with 230 “affordable and supportive housing units.” And again, my favorite part of all projects: the always questionable ground-floor retail space. This one is 5000 square ­feet.

What exactly is “supportive” housing? I think it would be interesting for someone at some city agency to produce the current numbers regarding the empty retail or commercial space on the ground floor of the completed projects, projects underway, and proposed projects. I do not know which agency would have this ­information.

In addition to those spaces, there are many empty spaces in other buildings, mainly from failed businesses. Although it does seem that 7 Eleven is doing its “civic duty” and is opening several stores in the downtown ­area.

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Downtown San Diego
Downtown San Diego

Author: Sandra Keener

Neighborhood: Downtown

Age: 60

Occupation: Retired

Well, there it was last summer for all to see and read, an article in Forbes entitled ­“America’s Worst Cities to Be a Sports Fan.” It stated: “Lining up behind Miami for the booby prize [is] San Diego ($300 a game for a family of four).”

The article noted a Chargers and Padres combined winning percentage of .425 (26th place “among 29 major sports metros”). The study was limited to the four major sports franchises, cities with at least two teams. The cost for a family of four to attend a Padres game was calculated based on the prices of four tickets, two small beers, four small sodas, four hot dogs, parking, two programs, and two inexpensive team caps (in San Diego?).

In other words, San Diegans cannot really afford to go see the Padres or Chargers ­play.

I hope Padres owner Mr. Moores and soon-to-be Padres owner Mr. Moorad saw this article. Do they

know how it feels to be a fan and read such an article? Do they now know that San Diego sports spectators rank as the second-worst fortunate in the ­nation?

Now that it is in print for all to see, Mr. Ballweg, Padres VP of sales, you ­don’t need to take our word for it. Now everybody knows we pay way, way too much for the pleasure of seeing games in San Diego. This can be fixed. You can work your way out of the top ten “worst.” It is simple: lower the ­prices.

After this blog was posted to the Reader website, the Padres announced a 25 percent price reduction of some tickets for the 2009 season and a “value meal” (hot dog, regular soda, peanuts, popcorn, and a cookie) for $5.

San Diego: Building, Building, Building

I was wandering around the internet, looking for information on “affordable” housing in San Diego. I noticed a news article on the proposed senior center at Beech Street and Fourth Avenue. This is the opening paragraph: “DOWNTOWN SAN DIEGO — A ­charity’s plan to create a cutting-edge senior center in downtown San Diego is faltering because the ­city’s downtown redevelopment agency wants to see a bigger building there ­instead.”

Will everyone who wants another high-rise building in San Diego please raise their hands? ­Aren’t there enough vacant condos, empty commercial spaces, and lack of affordable housing to make someone stop and think? I realize that the Centre City Development Corporation and friends are supposed to have some expertise in redevelopment and that I am merely one voice that sees things from the perspective of a downtown resident, but someone needs to speak up. Those who know me are probably laughing because here I am, speaking ­up!

There is another project proposal for the southeast corner of Broadway and Ninth Avenue. A 16-story building with 230 “affordable and supportive housing units.” And again, my favorite part of all projects: the always questionable ground-floor retail space. This one is 5000 square ­feet.

What exactly is “supportive” housing? I think it would be interesting for someone at some city agency to produce the current numbers regarding the empty retail or commercial space on the ground floor of the completed projects, projects underway, and proposed projects. I do not know which agency would have this ­information.

In addition to those spaces, there are many empty spaces in other buildings, mainly from failed businesses. Although it does seem that 7 Eleven is doing its “civic duty” and is opening several stores in the downtown ­area.

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Comments
1

Wow Sandra (Ms. Keener)! Congratualations on your award. That's really great. Best blog, huh? That's really something to be proud of. Just one thing before you go gettin' all overly excited ... I work for the San Diego Padres Front Office and know Jim Ballweg personally. I happened to ask him today if he read your piece. Quote: "Didn't see it. Send it to me though." Many Blessings for your valiant efforts but you didn't have anything to do with the price cuts.

Sorry, TheDodgersSuck

March 19, 2009

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