Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Board Games

Clean notebooks and sharpened pencils, white sneakers and new socks, homework and carpooling -- the school year has begun. This year's hectic schedule of school and sports has made me eager to have one night a week just for the family. I have this thought every September, but this year I've resolved to make it happen. The Kellys will have a family game night every Friday. But I need fresh suggestions for games, something other than Sorry, Monopoly, Clue, and Life, the old standards in our home. Games that stimulate the brain or build skills would be a plus. I made the round of phone calls to experienced moms to pick their brains on games they play in their homes."I love a game we bought at the state capitol building in Sacramento," explained Erica. "It's called California Bingo [ $13.95 on

ucybingogames.com ], and it is a bingo game which uses beautifully illustrated picture cards of California: Golden Gate Bridge, California sea lions, the California poppy. It familiarizes kids with important California facts, and even young ones can play."

On a similar theme, she recommended Sequence States and Capitals edition ( $13.49 on Amazon). "The cards have a picture of the state with the capital, and players match states shapes to ones on the board. It's a great geography aid."

"The other game I like," she added, "is Cinq-O [ $6.99 on Amazon]. It is a dice game that is great for multiplication skills."

Acting is what Bernice's kids love. "My sister-in-law gave me a game called Kids on Stage [ $16.06 on Amazon]. The kids act out either an animal, noun, or verb, which are stated on the card. The person who guesses the answer gets to move his game piece ahead on the board. There's a picture of the word on the card so that the child doesn't have to read to be able to play. I like games that involve a bit of physical activity so the kid isn't just sitting there. But it is not a game that has the kids running pig wild through the house either."

Speaking of wild pigs, Katie recommended a card game called Pig Pile, The Hog Wild Card Game ( $18.50 on Amazon). "It's played with a special deck of silly pig cards, and it comes with a couple dozen little plastic pigs to keep track of the points won. The object of the game is to get rid of all your cards.

"Another favorite in our home is Othello [ $9.99 on Amazon]. It's a board game played by two people with 64 checker-type pieces -- black on one side, white on the other. It's easy to learn, even for younger kids, but there's also a lot of strategy for older kids. The other game played often here is Blokus [ $23.99 on Amazon]. It's an abstract strategy game, where you try to cover the board with your pieces."

Lissa suggested the board game Settlers of Catan ( $39.98 on Amazon). "It's a game parents enjoy playing with kids; some of those kid games can be torture to sit through. You are building settlements and collecting resources to turn your settlements into cities. Different resources are needed to build a city after a settlement is made. On each turn, everyone playing has the opportunity to accumulate resources, so the kids don't get bored when it is not their turn. It is a good strategy game and it has enough of an element of chance so that even if the parent has an edge on the strategy, the roll of the die throws in a chance element. And it is neat for the kids to think about how civilizations were made."

Set ( $9.99 on Amazon) was Lissa's other recommendation. "It's a good exercise in visual imagery and spotting patterns," she said. "And oftentimes, younger children are better at it than older ones, which isn't often the case with games. It's great to find a game that works for many age levels. My six-year-old can trounce me at it every time," she chuckled.

Serena's game recommendations came as no surprise. "Being a military-minded family, the boys and Dad love to play Risk [ $21.13 on Amazon], which is a strategy game, but also teaches geography and sparks conversations about military history. It comes in several time-period versions, with lots of tiny little pieces. Our eight-year-old can play it with Dad's help. Even more involved, yet thoroughly engrossing for big boys and Dads, is Axis & Allies [ $10.99 on Amazon]. It's more complex than Risk ; has more little tiny pieces, tanks, planes, factories, ships; and it deals with more specifics of military tactics but with the same educational benefits as Risk . Both games take hours. So in houses with toddlers, it's good to play these games in a room with a lockable door, so the game can be left for a time without being ruined."

Serena added a few more nonmilitary suggestions. " Boggle [ $13.99 on Amazon] is a good spelling, vocabulary, concentration game, and it can be played in short sessions. The rules can be adjusted to make it competitive between the ages; big kids and parents can be limited to four- to five-letter words. We also love Yahtzee [ $7.99 on Amazon], for math skills, and Catch Phrase [ $19.99 on Amazon], which builds kids' powers of description. All of these have relatively few parts to keep track of, especially if you have Electronic Catch Phrase ."

"In our family," answered Angela, "the best investments have been cards. Cards are cheap, and the variations are endless and cut across ages. My children especially like group games like spoon, poker, and Egyptian war."

"I hate most board games," Angela continued, "because they take too long to finish and usually end up in a thousand pieces, which I pick up for a few weeks, then finally throw away with the rest of the sweepings. However, my kids do enjoy Scene It? Turner Classic Movies Edition [ $41.95 on gamefest.com ]. One evening, we had a very fun intergenerational evening playing Scene It? with grandma and grandpa."

She added one final recommendation. "Call us geeks, but chess remains a perennial favorite in our house because it's the one game besides poker and golf that Dad will join in!"

"My older kids like Pente [ $11.42 on Amazon]," replied Margaret, "which is simple but strategic, requiring thinking ahead.Jenga [ $12.99 on Amazon] is a wood-block building game that is another favorite."

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Interact with Animals, On the Harbor with Hard Kombucha, Interior Design Home Tours

Events July 9-July 11, 2020
Next Article

San Diego's punk music, goodbye to Lennon

Reader writers tell favorite music

Clean notebooks and sharpened pencils, white sneakers and new socks, homework and carpooling -- the school year has begun. This year's hectic schedule of school and sports has made me eager to have one night a week just for the family. I have this thought every September, but this year I've resolved to make it happen. The Kellys will have a family game night every Friday. But I need fresh suggestions for games, something other than Sorry, Monopoly, Clue, and Life, the old standards in our home. Games that stimulate the brain or build skills would be a plus. I made the round of phone calls to experienced moms to pick their brains on games they play in their homes."I love a game we bought at the state capitol building in Sacramento," explained Erica. "It's called California Bingo [ $13.95 on

ucybingogames.com ], and it is a bingo game which uses beautifully illustrated picture cards of California: Golden Gate Bridge, California sea lions, the California poppy. It familiarizes kids with important California facts, and even young ones can play."

On a similar theme, she recommended Sequence States and Capitals edition ( $13.49 on Amazon). "The cards have a picture of the state with the capital, and players match states shapes to ones on the board. It's a great geography aid."

"The other game I like," she added, "is Cinq-O [ $6.99 on Amazon]. It is a dice game that is great for multiplication skills."

Acting is what Bernice's kids love. "My sister-in-law gave me a game called Kids on Stage [ $16.06 on Amazon]. The kids act out either an animal, noun, or verb, which are stated on the card. The person who guesses the answer gets to move his game piece ahead on the board. There's a picture of the word on the card so that the child doesn't have to read to be able to play. I like games that involve a bit of physical activity so the kid isn't just sitting there. But it is not a game that has the kids running pig wild through the house either."

Speaking of wild pigs, Katie recommended a card game called Pig Pile, The Hog Wild Card Game ( $18.50 on Amazon). "It's played with a special deck of silly pig cards, and it comes with a couple dozen little plastic pigs to keep track of the points won. The object of the game is to get rid of all your cards.

"Another favorite in our home is Othello [ $9.99 on Amazon]. It's a board game played by two people with 64 checker-type pieces -- black on one side, white on the other. It's easy to learn, even for younger kids, but there's also a lot of strategy for older kids. The other game played often here is Blokus [ $23.99 on Amazon]. It's an abstract strategy game, where you try to cover the board with your pieces."

Lissa suggested the board game Settlers of Catan ( $39.98 on Amazon). "It's a game parents enjoy playing with kids; some of those kid games can be torture to sit through. You are building settlements and collecting resources to turn your settlements into cities. Different resources are needed to build a city after a settlement is made. On each turn, everyone playing has the opportunity to accumulate resources, so the kids don't get bored when it is not their turn. It is a good strategy game and it has enough of an element of chance so that even if the parent has an edge on the strategy, the roll of the die throws in a chance element. And it is neat for the kids to think about how civilizations were made."

Set ( $9.99 on Amazon) was Lissa's other recommendation. "It's a good exercise in visual imagery and spotting patterns," she said. "And oftentimes, younger children are better at it than older ones, which isn't often the case with games. It's great to find a game that works for many age levels. My six-year-old can trounce me at it every time," she chuckled.

Serena's game recommendations came as no surprise. "Being a military-minded family, the boys and Dad love to play Risk [ $21.13 on Amazon], which is a strategy game, but also teaches geography and sparks conversations about military history. It comes in several time-period versions, with lots of tiny little pieces. Our eight-year-old can play it with Dad's help. Even more involved, yet thoroughly engrossing for big boys and Dads, is Axis & Allies [ $10.99 on Amazon]. It's more complex than Risk ; has more little tiny pieces, tanks, planes, factories, ships; and it deals with more specifics of military tactics but with the same educational benefits as Risk . Both games take hours. So in houses with toddlers, it's good to play these games in a room with a lockable door, so the game can be left for a time without being ruined."

Serena added a few more nonmilitary suggestions. " Boggle [ $13.99 on Amazon] is a good spelling, vocabulary, concentration game, and it can be played in short sessions. The rules can be adjusted to make it competitive between the ages; big kids and parents can be limited to four- to five-letter words. We also love Yahtzee [ $7.99 on Amazon], for math skills, and Catch Phrase [ $19.99 on Amazon], which builds kids' powers of description. All of these have relatively few parts to keep track of, especially if you have Electronic Catch Phrase ."

"In our family," answered Angela, "the best investments have been cards. Cards are cheap, and the variations are endless and cut across ages. My children especially like group games like spoon, poker, and Egyptian war."

"I hate most board games," Angela continued, "because they take too long to finish and usually end up in a thousand pieces, which I pick up for a few weeks, then finally throw away with the rest of the sweepings. However, my kids do enjoy Scene It? Turner Classic Movies Edition [ $41.95 on gamefest.com ]. One evening, we had a very fun intergenerational evening playing Scene It? with grandma and grandpa."

She added one final recommendation. "Call us geeks, but chess remains a perennial favorite in our house because it's the one game besides poker and golf that Dad will join in!"

"My older kids like Pente [ $11.42 on Amazon]," replied Margaret, "which is simple but strategic, requiring thinking ahead.Jenga [ $12.99 on Amazon] is a wood-block building game that is another favorite."

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Music follows nature – the Moldau, Central Asia's steppes, the Alps, the Appian Way , cliffs of Cornwall

We find Siegfried resting under a linden tree
Next Article

A poem for Independence Day by Francis Scott Key

His poem “Defence of Fort McHenry” became the lyrics to “The Star-Spangled Banner”
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close