Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

Spielberg Dreams

'It all started when the cost of producing video dropped way down," says Ben Cote, "digital media guru" for DIVX, an online digital media company. "People had access to things like home video cameras. Avid, a big [film editing] program used in the film and television industry for years, was expensive and hard and only available to people who could pay $50,000 for a copy. Now there are smaller programs and versions, like iMovie from Apple, or products from Pinnacle [a division of Avid] -- third-party video applications that are affordable and available." Cote will participate in the REEL TALKS panel discussion, "Online Cinema: Film in the Age of YouTube and Vlogs" (video blogs), on Saturday, March 10. The panel discussion is part of a workshop series hosted by the 2007 San Diego Latino Film Festival.

Cote says that with the tools available today, filmmakers can find their audience through their audience. He cites as an example the film Four Eyed Monsters, which debuted at the Slamdance Film Festival two years ago. The filmmakers, Cote explains, produced two episodes a month, which they posted on a website that they created for the film.

"They involved the audience on the website, building a buzz. Through that they were able to do some screenings locally in various cities by asking their audience, through this website, 'Would you like to see this? Where are you located?' Once a certain amount of people in a certain zip code responded, they would rent a theater in that area and sell out the theater."

The filmmakers are working on getting the film to DVD, but fans can already purchase the feature film direct-to-download. "Eventually, I do think DVDs will become obsolete," says Cote. He recently observed a friend's 18-month-old child send photos via a Blackberry. "These kids growing up won't own physical copies of their media, they will download everything directly. Personally, I love it. I hate CDs. I'm very rough with my CDs. They always break and crack. My wife just bought me a couple that you can't buy on digital download. I put them on my computer, I throw them in a closet, and I never look at them again. They just take up space."

Cote believes that those who are wary of purchasing items they can neither see nor touch are in need of a paradigm shift. "I have older neighbors who are still confused by letterbox [widescreen]; they want to know why they can't see the whole picture." Cote is sure that people like his neighbors "will swing the way of digital when they see the convenience, the easier access to more videos and audio files. Once a really good user experience comes into play and appears in the marketplace, I think the resistance will abate."

Cote says that for nearly every imaginable subject, there is an audience, and he describes the number of categories as infinite.

"For filmmakers, that's great. There are already fan pages for people who like roller-skating films. They may not have [videos] on their site, but someone can make a film and post it there, and there's already an interactive community to reach out to."

How might a growing online cinema presence affect Hollywood movies? "They're not going to die out completely," answers Cote. "But they will adapt and change. So many movies will need those huge $100 million budgets. No one is going to create the next Superman with a video camera in their bedroom. [Hollywood] will be able to make more pictures with smaller budgets and use online tools and online communities to help market to their audience better."

Cote notes that Hollywood is releasing Spider-Man 3, Shrek 3,and Pirates of the Caribbean 3 at the start of this summer. "This is kind of a statement of where they're at," he says.

Novice filmmakers can produce a film with very little capital. High-definition cameras are available for $1000, and basic movie-editing software comes free with most new computers. "It levels the playing field, allowing smaller filmmakers with smaller budgets to create great films, and the audience is given more choices for what they want to see."

The major cost of making a film, Cote says, is time. "Doing a regular vlog is a lot of work; it takes time to shoot and edit. You'll see more regular blogs occasionally feature a video here and there." Cote estimates that of his friends, 85 percent have blogs, and 40 percent of those people have vlogs. "Of the 40 percent, 90 percent are doing it full time, or that's what they want to be their full-time job, so they're spending full-time hours on it. It's a time-consuming thing to create that media." -- Barbarella

Online Cinema: Film in the Age of YouTube and Vlogs Panel discussion workshop at the San Diego Latino Film Festival Saturday, March 10 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. UltraStar Mission Valley Cinema, Hazard Center 7510 Hazard Center Road Mission Valley Cost: $15 general admission Info: 619-230-1938 or www.mediaartscenter.org

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Angry Pete's Pizza brings Detroit to Kensington

Thick crust and caramelized cheese will make you forget about round pies
Next Article

Giovanni Sgambati – an Italian Liszt

Wagner pushed for publication of Sgambati’s two piano quintets.

'It all started when the cost of producing video dropped way down," says Ben Cote, "digital media guru" for DIVX, an online digital media company. "People had access to things like home video cameras. Avid, a big [film editing] program used in the film and television industry for years, was expensive and hard and only available to people who could pay $50,000 for a copy. Now there are smaller programs and versions, like iMovie from Apple, or products from Pinnacle [a division of Avid] -- third-party video applications that are affordable and available." Cote will participate in the REEL TALKS panel discussion, "Online Cinema: Film in the Age of YouTube and Vlogs" (video blogs), on Saturday, March 10. The panel discussion is part of a workshop series hosted by the 2007 San Diego Latino Film Festival.

Cote says that with the tools available today, filmmakers can find their audience through their audience. He cites as an example the film Four Eyed Monsters, which debuted at the Slamdance Film Festival two years ago. The filmmakers, Cote explains, produced two episodes a month, which they posted on a website that they created for the film.

"They involved the audience on the website, building a buzz. Through that they were able to do some screenings locally in various cities by asking their audience, through this website, 'Would you like to see this? Where are you located?' Once a certain amount of people in a certain zip code responded, they would rent a theater in that area and sell out the theater."

The filmmakers are working on getting the film to DVD, but fans can already purchase the feature film direct-to-download. "Eventually, I do think DVDs will become obsolete," says Cote. He recently observed a friend's 18-month-old child send photos via a Blackberry. "These kids growing up won't own physical copies of their media, they will download everything directly. Personally, I love it. I hate CDs. I'm very rough with my CDs. They always break and crack. My wife just bought me a couple that you can't buy on digital download. I put them on my computer, I throw them in a closet, and I never look at them again. They just take up space."

Cote believes that those who are wary of purchasing items they can neither see nor touch are in need of a paradigm shift. "I have older neighbors who are still confused by letterbox [widescreen]; they want to know why they can't see the whole picture." Cote is sure that people like his neighbors "will swing the way of digital when they see the convenience, the easier access to more videos and audio files. Once a really good user experience comes into play and appears in the marketplace, I think the resistance will abate."

Cote says that for nearly every imaginable subject, there is an audience, and he describes the number of categories as infinite.

"For filmmakers, that's great. There are already fan pages for people who like roller-skating films. They may not have [videos] on their site, but someone can make a film and post it there, and there's already an interactive community to reach out to."

How might a growing online cinema presence affect Hollywood movies? "They're not going to die out completely," answers Cote. "But they will adapt and change. So many movies will need those huge $100 million budgets. No one is going to create the next Superman with a video camera in their bedroom. [Hollywood] will be able to make more pictures with smaller budgets and use online tools and online communities to help market to their audience better."

Cote notes that Hollywood is releasing Spider-Man 3, Shrek 3,and Pirates of the Caribbean 3 at the start of this summer. "This is kind of a statement of where they're at," he says.

Novice filmmakers can produce a film with very little capital. High-definition cameras are available for $1000, and basic movie-editing software comes free with most new computers. "It levels the playing field, allowing smaller filmmakers with smaller budgets to create great films, and the audience is given more choices for what they want to see."

The major cost of making a film, Cote says, is time. "Doing a regular vlog is a lot of work; it takes time to shoot and edit. You'll see more regular blogs occasionally feature a video here and there." Cote estimates that of his friends, 85 percent have blogs, and 40 percent of those people have vlogs. "Of the 40 percent, 90 percent are doing it full time, or that's what they want to be their full-time job, so they're spending full-time hours on it. It's a time-consuming thing to create that media." -- Barbarella

Online Cinema: Film in the Age of YouTube and Vlogs Panel discussion workshop at the San Diego Latino Film Festival Saturday, March 10 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. UltraStar Mission Valley Cinema, Hazard Center 7510 Hazard Center Road Mission Valley Cost: $15 general admission Info: 619-230-1938 or www.mediaartscenter.org

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

The Longview Manor estate built by Ralph Hurlburt

He designed dozens of distinctive houses from Point Loma to Kensington to La Mesa
Next Article

Angry Pete's Pizza brings Detroit to Kensington

Thick crust and caramelized cheese will make you forget about round pies
Comments
0

Be the first to leave a comment.

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close