Quantcast
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

The Blue Barrel

"The Miramar landfill is set to reach capacity by 2013," says Steve South, president of Edco Disposal, a waste-collection and recycling company headquartered in Lemon Grove. "This means we're going to have to recycle more and come up with increased alternatives for different types of processing." Edco, named after Ed Burr, founder and owner, is "a famous, old, family-owned business that has been picking up our trash for what seems like forever -- more than 30 years," says Helen Ofield, vice president for historic sites and installations for the Lemon Grove Historical Society. On Thursday, January 3, South and Ofield will lead a tour of the new plant.

"This is the 30th anniversary of cityhood for Lemon Grove," says Ofield. "On December 19, 1977, the city council debated until midnight on whether to relax the zoning code for Edco, which had just opened. Trucks were coming in, and neighbors up on the hill were irate, and the council decided to limit the use of Edco's property to corporate offices only -- now [Edco is] the last word on trash collection and technology." Edco is the only facility in San Diego that can process mixed-construction demolition debris.

In 1989, state government passed the Integrated Waste Management Act, or AB 939, requiring all California jurisdictions to divert 50 percent of the total waste away from landfills by the year 2000. Currently, according to Senator Alex Padilla, only 62 percent of the state's jurisdictions meet that requirement. Padilla wrote the pending Senate Bill 1020, "Solid Waste Diversion," which calls for 60 percent statewide diversion by 2012 and 75 percent by 2020.

"To accomplish the goals of AB 939, we invested millions to build [recycling] plants, as opposed to building a new landfill," says South. Edco's new ability to receive mixed demolition debris has been critical to the city in the wake of the fires. "A lot of the material generated from the fire, we're receiving it from both the city and the county and sorting through it," says South. "Obviously the fires were a tragedy, and these were not anticipated volumes that would be generated for the landfills. By processing this debris, we're able to minimize the impact of the tragedy." Once it is separated and processed, most of the demolition debris, like concrete and asphalt, is reused locally.

Recyclable waste is received "fully comingled," says South, meaning "the glass is in with the paper, in with metal, plastic, and cardboard." The material is sent over a series of belts and conveyors for mechanical and manual separation. "We have an optic sort, or computer-scanning program that separates [material]. Once the optic eye makes a determination, it sends the reading to an air compressor, which then will blow air and direct some of the material [mostly plastic] onto a different conveyor....

"Typically, if people aren't recycling, it's because they just don't understand that every person makes a difference," says South. "Once people see what we're doing, how you can separate [material] and put it to reuse, then they have a greater understanding of why they should participate. Once we educate people, it's been our experience that they want to do the right thing."

South adds, "Kids are the greatest recyclers. For them, that's the way it is and there's no alternative. My kids, Trevor and Abigail, understand what goes in the blue barrel."

Some well-meaning adults still need to learn the "do's and don'ts" of recycling. Objects not accepted by the facility include plastic bags (many of which can be returned to grocery stores that will send them back to the factories that produced them), wax paper, Styrofoam, ceramics, or any plastic or glass items not labeled "CA Redemption Value" or "CA Cash Refund."

"The most damaging are any fluids -- automotive fluids like antifreeze or bleach," explains South. "They mix with the other material and tend to contaminate loads. Oil can be recycled, but it needs to be brought in separately in a sealed container." The most common mistake do-gooders make is to inadvertently dump a bag of trash that should have been placed in a trash container into the recycling bin. -- Barbarella

Tour of EDCO Recycling Facility
Thursday, January 3
1 p.m.
Lemon Grove Historical Society
3185 Olive Street
Lemon Grove
Info: 619-460-4353 or email [email protected]yahoo.com

Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all

Previous article

Three poems for August by Dorothy Parker

With an acidic wit and keen eye for flawed humanity

"The Miramar landfill is set to reach capacity by 2013," says Steve South, president of Edco Disposal, a waste-collection and recycling company headquartered in Lemon Grove. "This means we're going to have to recycle more and come up with increased alternatives for different types of processing." Edco, named after Ed Burr, founder and owner, is "a famous, old, family-owned business that has been picking up our trash for what seems like forever -- more than 30 years," says Helen Ofield, vice president for historic sites and installations for the Lemon Grove Historical Society. On Thursday, January 3, South and Ofield will lead a tour of the new plant.

"This is the 30th anniversary of cityhood for Lemon Grove," says Ofield. "On December 19, 1977, the city council debated until midnight on whether to relax the zoning code for Edco, which had just opened. Trucks were coming in, and neighbors up on the hill were irate, and the council decided to limit the use of Edco's property to corporate offices only -- now [Edco is] the last word on trash collection and technology." Edco is the only facility in San Diego that can process mixed-construction demolition debris.

In 1989, state government passed the Integrated Waste Management Act, or AB 939, requiring all California jurisdictions to divert 50 percent of the total waste away from landfills by the year 2000. Currently, according to Senator Alex Padilla, only 62 percent of the state's jurisdictions meet that requirement. Padilla wrote the pending Senate Bill 1020, "Solid Waste Diversion," which calls for 60 percent statewide diversion by 2012 and 75 percent by 2020.

"To accomplish the goals of AB 939, we invested millions to build [recycling] plants, as opposed to building a new landfill," says South. Edco's new ability to receive mixed demolition debris has been critical to the city in the wake of the fires. "A lot of the material generated from the fire, we're receiving it from both the city and the county and sorting through it," says South. "Obviously the fires were a tragedy, and these were not anticipated volumes that would be generated for the landfills. By processing this debris, we're able to minimize the impact of the tragedy." Once it is separated and processed, most of the demolition debris, like concrete and asphalt, is reused locally.

Recyclable waste is received "fully comingled," says South, meaning "the glass is in with the paper, in with metal, plastic, and cardboard." The material is sent over a series of belts and conveyors for mechanical and manual separation. "We have an optic sort, or computer-scanning program that separates [material]. Once the optic eye makes a determination, it sends the reading to an air compressor, which then will blow air and direct some of the material [mostly plastic] onto a different conveyor....

"Typically, if people aren't recycling, it's because they just don't understand that every person makes a difference," says South. "Once people see what we're doing, how you can separate [material] and put it to reuse, then they have a greater understanding of why they should participate. Once we educate people, it's been our experience that they want to do the right thing."

South adds, "Kids are the greatest recyclers. For them, that's the way it is and there's no alternative. My kids, Trevor and Abigail, understand what goes in the blue barrel."

Some well-meaning adults still need to learn the "do's and don'ts" of recycling. Objects not accepted by the facility include plastic bags (many of which can be returned to grocery stores that will send them back to the factories that produced them), wax paper, Styrofoam, ceramics, or any plastic or glass items not labeled "CA Redemption Value" or "CA Cash Refund."

"The most damaging are any fluids -- automotive fluids like antifreeze or bleach," explains South. "They mix with the other material and tend to contaminate loads. Oil can be recycled, but it needs to be brought in separately in a sealed container." The most common mistake do-gooders make is to inadvertently dump a bag of trash that should have been placed in a trash container into the recycling bin. -- Barbarella

Tour of EDCO Recycling Facility
Thursday, January 3
1 p.m.
Lemon Grove Historical Society
3185 Olive Street
Lemon Grove
Info: 619-460-4353 or email [email protected]yahoo.com

Sponsored
Here's something you might be interested in.
Submit a free classified
or view all
Previous article

Immigrants flock to San Diego

Indian-Americans, Casa Cornelia, Border Angels, Somalis, Vietnamese in Linda Vista
Next Article

Nicholas Wiseman: a great influence on John Henry Newman

Also known as author of Fabiola, a novel
Comments
2

did you know in japan you can buy headbands made out of recycled trojans? You could get an STD from your hair accessory. Happy to be an american....

Jan. 3, 2008

Okay, now that's just weird. I've been to Japan, and I am going back, probably this fall. I'll be sure to stay away from all head gear. Surprising, because the cities there are so CLEAN. Thanks for the tip!

Jan. 22, 2008

Sign in to comment

Sign in

Art Reviews — W.S. Di Piero's eye on exhibits Ask a Hipster — Advice you didn't know you needed Best Buys — San Diego shopping Big Screen — Movie commentary Blurt — Music's inside track Booze News — San Diego spirits City Lights — News and politics Classical Music — Immortal beauty Classifieds — Free and easy Cover Stories — Front-page features Excerpts — Literary and spiritual excerpts Famous Former Neighbors — Next-door celebs Feast! — Food & drink reviews Feature Stories — Local news & stories From the Archives — Spotlight on the past Golden Dreams — Talk of the town Here's the Deal — Chad Deal's watering holes Just Announced — The scoop on shows Letters — Our inbox [email protected] — Local movie buffs share favorites Movie Reviews — Our critics' picks and pans Musician Interviews — Up close with local artists Neighborhood News from Stringers — Hyperlocal news News Ticker — News & politics Obermeyer — San Diego politics illustrated Of Note — Concert picks Out & About — What's Happening Overheard in San Diego — Eavesdropping illustrated Poetry — The old and the new Pour Over — Grab a cup Reader Travel — Travel section built by travelers Reading — The hunt for intellectuals Roam-O-Rama — SoCal's best hiking/biking trails San Diego Beer News — Inside San Diego suds SD on the QT — Almost factual news Set 'em Up Joe — Bartenders' drink recipes Sheep and Goats — Places of worship Special Issues — The best of Sports — Athletics without gush Street Style — San Diego streets have style Suit Up — Fashion tips for dudes Theater Reviews — Local productions Theater antireviews — Narrow your search Tin Fork — Silver spoon alternative Under the Radar — Matt Potter's undercover work Unforgettable — Long-ago San Diego Unreal Estate — San Diego's priciest pads Waterfront — All things ocean Your Week — Daily event picks
4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
Close