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Solana Beach

Solana Beach - Image by Dave Allen
Solana Beach

I discovered Solana Beach because of a pig — well, two pigs, actually — Sporky and Frances Bacon.

Frances (name variation because she was female) lived on the middle Barbara in Solana Beach. Before I met Frances, I didn’t know that there are three Barbara Avenues in this town and that none of them connect.

Frances Bacon belonged to Linnea Dayton and her family. Sporky was my pig.

We (the pigs, Linnea, and I) went on a walk back in 1989 that started at North Rios, wound east through the San Elijo Lagoon Preserve, and eventually headed south, up through Holmwood Canyon. It was so beautiful, this piece of undeveloped land. We walked by a bench with a plaque thanking Gemma Parks for saving Holmwood Canyon from developers. I thank her every time I walk past.

When we went on this hike, Linnea and I were hoping we could pigsit for each other. I met Linnea because I wrote a how-to article for a computer graphics publication she edited. Eight years later, I ended up moving to Solana Beach, coincidentally within a block of her house (and perhaps more importantly, within walking distance of the Belly Up Tavern).

Twenty-five years ago, Linnea, along with Linda La Grange and Bobbie Hilton, started the alternative class that has become the Global Education program at the Skyline public school in Solana Beach. My seven- and ten-year-old children attend this program and have since kindergarten. I even ran for the school board (and lost) because I feel so beholden to these teachers. It is a breath of fresh air for people with inquisitive children — kids who want to participate in their own education and not have it force-fed to them. And for parents who want to participate as well. My daughter learned her geometric solids in kindergarten. At the same time, she learned about the domestication of wheat and the rise of Egypt, and the domestication of corn and the rise of the Aztecs — cultures that share the pyramid as a focal point. Bobbie and Linda still teach at the school. My children live within blocks of their teachers. We regularly stop by their houses to say hi. That kind of stability, of localness, is very rare in growing urban communities. This is exactly why I moved here six years ago, after living ten years in La Costa (a community that’s being raped by Carlsbad).

I always used to say that no house in Solana Beach is completely up to code. That endears me to a city. But with the recent gentrification driven by high housing prices, I’ve had to stop. Admittedly, Solana Beach is a town with a schism. Besides the wealthy influx, there’s the artistic community (some members have lived in Solana Beach for over 20 years), who helped install the big, voluptuous woman named Star (created by the late Niki de Saint Phalle and on loan for only a while longer) on the corner of Lomas Santa Fe and Cedros Avenue.

There’s the developer posse, which can be seen throwing its weight around with the Gateway Hotel (and muchos condos!), which is being foisted upon the Solana Beach public. The developer is having private meetings with important locals to try to subdue the community. (If it were so good for the community, why would the meetings be private?)

But what makes Solana Beach interesting for me is not only the Hispanic history, which infuses the area with words of Spanish origin: Rios, Cedros, and Granados (rivers, cedars, and pomegranate trees), but that the town, because of these roots, has adopted the feeling of a zócalo — where people walk just to walk and to talk to friends and neighbors, and they don’t rush to get anywhere in particular.

I moved here because the town has a beautiful view and was unpretentious. I worry about it becoming more affected as it goes upscale, but Linnea assures me a pig could still go on a walk in Solana Beach these days.

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Solana Beach - Image by Dave Allen
Solana Beach

I discovered Solana Beach because of a pig — well, two pigs, actually — Sporky and Frances Bacon.

Frances (name variation because she was female) lived on the middle Barbara in Solana Beach. Before I met Frances, I didn’t know that there are three Barbara Avenues in this town and that none of them connect.

Frances Bacon belonged to Linnea Dayton and her family. Sporky was my pig.

We (the pigs, Linnea, and I) went on a walk back in 1989 that started at North Rios, wound east through the San Elijo Lagoon Preserve, and eventually headed south, up through Holmwood Canyon. It was so beautiful, this piece of undeveloped land. We walked by a bench with a plaque thanking Gemma Parks for saving Holmwood Canyon from developers. I thank her every time I walk past.

When we went on this hike, Linnea and I were hoping we could pigsit for each other. I met Linnea because I wrote a how-to article for a computer graphics publication she edited. Eight years later, I ended up moving to Solana Beach, coincidentally within a block of her house (and perhaps more importantly, within walking distance of the Belly Up Tavern).

Twenty-five years ago, Linnea, along with Linda La Grange and Bobbie Hilton, started the alternative class that has become the Global Education program at the Skyline public school in Solana Beach. My seven- and ten-year-old children attend this program and have since kindergarten. I even ran for the school board (and lost) because I feel so beholden to these teachers. It is a breath of fresh air for people with inquisitive children — kids who want to participate in their own education and not have it force-fed to them. And for parents who want to participate as well. My daughter learned her geometric solids in kindergarten. At the same time, she learned about the domestication of wheat and the rise of Egypt, and the domestication of corn and the rise of the Aztecs — cultures that share the pyramid as a focal point. Bobbie and Linda still teach at the school. My children live within blocks of their teachers. We regularly stop by their houses to say hi. That kind of stability, of localness, is very rare in growing urban communities. This is exactly why I moved here six years ago, after living ten years in La Costa (a community that’s being raped by Carlsbad).

I always used to say that no house in Solana Beach is completely up to code. That endears me to a city. But with the recent gentrification driven by high housing prices, I’ve had to stop. Admittedly, Solana Beach is a town with a schism. Besides the wealthy influx, there’s the artistic community (some members have lived in Solana Beach for over 20 years), who helped install the big, voluptuous woman named Star (created by the late Niki de Saint Phalle and on loan for only a while longer) on the corner of Lomas Santa Fe and Cedros Avenue.

There’s the developer posse, which can be seen throwing its weight around with the Gateway Hotel (and muchos condos!), which is being foisted upon the Solana Beach public. The developer is having private meetings with important locals to try to subdue the community. (If it were so good for the community, why would the meetings be private?)

But what makes Solana Beach interesting for me is not only the Hispanic history, which infuses the area with words of Spanish origin: Rios, Cedros, and Granados (rivers, cedars, and pomegranate trees), but that the town, because of these roots, has adopted the feeling of a zócalo — where people walk just to walk and to talk to friends and neighbors, and they don’t rush to get anywhere in particular.

I moved here because the town has a beautiful view and was unpretentious. I worry about it becoming more affected as it goes upscale, but Linnea assures me a pig could still go on a walk in Solana Beach these days.

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Holmwood Canyon was saved by an organization called The Friends of Holmwood Canyon. It was founded, organized and led by Jack Peek. It was an amazing effort, involving buses down to the County Building, arial photos, professional engineering reports, and auctions to raise money. Sadly, Jack passed away last year.

Sept. 16, 2019

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4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
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