4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs

1977 San Diego guide to movers and shakers

The heavy 50

  • Michael Newman
  • A former Rhodesian consul and editorial writer for the Union, he now manages and sets the editorial tone of the Southern Cross, San Diego's Catholic weekly.
  • Shirley Wood
  • An elementary school teacher, she was the only non-scientist on the city committee studying the political hazards of genetic research at USCD's medical school.
  • Archie Payne
  • Community college administrator by day, manager and owner of downtown's Crossroads bar by night, he continues the club's 15-year tradition of live jazz.
  • Reverend David Farrell
  • The gay community's most lucid spokesman, he leads a flock of 200 homophiles at Golden Hill's Metropolitan Community Church.
  • Ron Zappardino
  • The corner of Third Avenue and Plaza Street downtown looks a little brighter since Zappardino, a former commercial pilot, joined with partners to open Frenchy Marseilles', a wood-and-plants cocktail lounge.
  • Paul Stevens
  • When Campbell Industries got caught in a financial slump, he was drafted to ut the shipbuilding firm back in the lack. Stevens has also taken on chores .is negotiator for the San Diego Symphony which is trying this year to restore itself to the good graces of COMBO, the city's performing arts fund.
  • Maryann Zones
  • Research assistant at Scripps Clinic, mother of five, and ardent soccer player, this indefatigable Ocean Beach resident divides her spare time among the community planning group, the state's coastal commission advisory board, and th|e O.B. community school and recreation center.
  • Don Smith
  • An original stockholder and president of the Del Mar Thoroughbred Club, he retired this month after 45 years of overseeing the annual 7-week horse racing season. This summer the track set nine attendance and gross receipt records and was one of only six tracks in the country where total betting averaged over $2 million a day.
  • Sandy Dutky
  • With the help of 100 fellow aficionados, she keeps an interest in folk music alive through the San Diego Folksong Society. The group, formed 25 years ago by singer Sam Hinton, provided musical accompaniment for the anniversary sailing of the Star of India last July.
  • Claude Gilbert
  • When San Diego State's football coach, Don Coryell, left to take over the St. Louis Cardinals, local fans worried that their favorite college team might be lacking leadership. But Gilbert, a former assistant coach, has kept the Aztecs among the country's most closely watched teams.
  • Ray and Dan Hamel
  • Owners of a Mission Beach cyclery shop, they put skateboard wheels on rollerskates and started one of the biggest fads to hit Southern California since surfing: 'round-the-clock roller skating.
  • Dick Bass
  • Symphony directors raided the Los Angeles Philharmonic this year to bring Bass here to manage the 85 musicians who comprise our orchestra.
  • Dr. Al Anderson
  • He heads the city's Convention and Tourist Bureau, a group of professionals who must take much of the credit for attracting visitors and keeping our economy afloat.
  • Reverend George Walker Smith
  • No single member keeps the Board of Education in the public limelight more than the outspoken Smith, who doubles as pastor of Golden Hill Presbyterian Church.
  • Will Boulet
  • With help from the city's park and recreation department, he staged five free jazz concerts at various locations throughout the summer.
  • Mike Jones
  • Architect by profession, guardian of the city's historical landmarks by passion, Jones almost single-handedly convinced the city council to restore downtown's Horton Plaza to its original turn-of-the-century design.
  • David Creigh
  • The Seder-Creigh Gallery, an especially good private art showcase, is managed by this Coronado attorney, who has this year displayed the work of artists Ronald Davis and Keith Sonnier.
  • Joan Casale
  • President of the local chapter of the National Organization for Women (NOW), Casale went after media executives by compiling two surveys on the public portrayal of women by television and newspapers
  • Tom Metzger
  • As state-wide organizer for the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, he kept the fiery issue of the Camp Pendleton barracks attack alive in newspapers, magazines, and radio talk-shows across the country.
  • Auggie Felando
  • A maritime attorney and manager of the American Tunaboat Association, he had a busy year negotiating with boat crews, environmentalists, and the federal government over the new laws governing tuna fishing.
  • Mauvorneen O'Connor
  • If a senior citizen high-rise breaks ground as part of the downtown redevelopment project, much of the credit will go to this member of one of San Diego’s most active families.
  • Phemie Warren
  • She brought the Radiothon method of fundraising to San Diego this year and left the symphony $58,000 richer.
  • Keven Munnelly
  • As the city's endowments officer, he has convinced a number of San Diegans to give or will to the city plots of land, restorable houses, and sums of cash.
  • Roy Potter
  • Whatever political clout remains vested with downtown's businessmen is delivered by Potter, the executive director of San Diegans, Inc.
  • Michael Lane
  • The county's methadone maintenance program was almost single-handedly de-funded by this admitted heroin addict who has publicly argued for radical therapy for junkies.
  • Harvey Furgatch
  • One of this city's few monied liberals, he led the fight against renewing its low-cost lease obtained by the San Diego Rowing Club on San Diego Bay. His long-time support of Governor Jerry Brown resulted in Furgatch's appointment early this year to the state Horse Racing Commission.
  • Hugh Boyle
  • As president of the San Diego Teachers Association he led. a four-day strike against the city's schools. For his role in the labor dispute, the first of its kind, Boyle was fined $4,000 and sentenced to 10 days in jail, both of which are now under appeal.
  • R.L. Burns
  • This San Bernardino industrialist moved his firm to San Diego and his family into the expansive La Jolla Farms estate once owned by Earl Gagosian of Royal Inns fame. In a matter of weeks, Burns had pledged over $120,000 to local charities.
  • Jacquelyn Littlefield
  • Although live performances have been sporadic of late, she manages to keep the doors of her elegant Spreckels Theatre open for touring plays and musicials.

Lee Grissom

Sponsored
Sponsored

He has pushed the San Diego Chamber of Commerce into the public eye by hiring an able staff and tackling major issues. At the same time, the 35-year-old urban planner has used the chamber as a power base from which to launch an assault on elective office.

  • Alfonso Macy
  • Along with fellow architect Jon Henderson, Macy spent five months and invested $15,000 to restore lower 5th Avenue's Yuma Building, a classic Victorian three-story, for use as an office.
  • Norma Freeman
  • Nationwide attention was focused on San Diego when she led a group of parents in trashing the shelves of a pornographic bookstore and picketing a Lakeside theater to protest the spread of "chicken porn."
  • Fritjof Thygeson
  • He helped lead two frontal assaults on San Diego Gas and Electric by opposing the utility's planned multimillion dollar rate increase and pushing for a moratorium on the proposed Sundesert nuclear power plant.
  • Sister Winnie Smith
  • For 28 years she's directed God's Extended Hand Mission—a non-denominational soup kitchen that serves over 700 free meals a week from its F Street storefront.
  • Melvin Freilicher
  • Political pamphleteer, editor, and artist, he helped found the United Artists Coalition, a group of San Diego artists from different media.
  • Eleanor Antin
  • This self-described "post conceptual" artist often leaves audiences gasping at the completion of her multi-media performances. A professor of visual arts at UCSD, her portrayal of nurse Florence Nightingale shocked the well-heeled crowds attending a fundraiser for the La Jolla Museum last month.
  • A.W. Coggeshall
  • Dressed in a brown workshirt and boots, he seems anything but a 71-year-old millionaire who's trying to bring live performances to his recently purchased California Theatre.
  • Det Merriman
  • A Rupert Murdock-like takeover of the ailing monthly magazine North County Living was consummated early this year by this young publisher. He also owns Applause magazine and Eucalyptus Productions, a typesetting and graphics business.
  • George Mitrovich
  • When he's not advising Supervisors Roger Hedgecock or Jim Bates, this avid Democrat is busy shuttling celebrities (Jerry Brown, Jimmy Carter, Gloria Steinem) into town for appearances before his City Club.
  • Elinor Oatman
  • The first woman to sit on the board of directors of San Diego Trust and Savings, and a former president of the Fine Arts Gallery, this San Diego native is an overseer of UCSD and a director of USD's School of Business.
  • Bill Bellville
  • This year he added a second downtown dinner theater, the refurbished Tower Bowl on Kettner and C Streets, to a growing list of downtown properties. Bellville, who's referred to by his employees as "downtown's one-man redevelopment project," started the meal and musical combination two years ago at the Hotel San Diego, which houses his Broadway Dinner Theatre.
  • Lee Bartell
  • This 67-year-old communications entrepreneur came out of semi-retirement by transforming ailing KDEO radio (now KMJC) into a top contender in the tenny-bopper market. His number-one opponent is now KCBQ, a bubble gum station whose rise to the top in the 1960s, ironically, was masterminded by Bartell himself.
  • Al Hughes
  • Despite the protests of Hughes and his Citizens Action Group, Imperial Beach Mayor Bert Stites and councilman Henry McCarty pushed ahead with a beachfront redevelopment plan for their city. The controversy prompted a special recall election in which the two officials were voted out of office.
  • Hope Shaw
  • That our only all-jazz radio station (KSDS-FM) finally made it to stereo has much to do with her work in the telecommunications department at San Diego City College. When she wasn't busy helping chief engineer Jim Dark round up the money for a new transmitter and other necessary gear, Shaw kept busy supervising projects such as the recording of performances by local jazz musicians for broadcast.
  • Bea Evenson
  • When the city condemned Balboa Park's Food and Beverage building, a remnant of the 1915 World Exposition, she founded the Committer of 100 which raised funds to rebuild it. This year the committee, which now boasts 1,800 members, turned its attentions to the park's neglected organ pavilion.
  • June Gutfleisch
  • Having charmed the city's redevelopment board into giving her the Knights of Pythias building on a dollar-a-year lease, she is now organizing the Intercultura! Council of the Arts and planning workshops for seniors, the handicapped, and school children.
  • Jan Hintzman
  • She spent the first six months of 1977 fighting for creation of a neighborhood park in the residential area south of San Diego State. Rolando-Clay Park, as the two-acre plot will be called, was approved by the city council in July.
  • Danny Millsap
  • Professional boxing and wrestling made a comeback at the "New Coliseum" under his own brand of promoting. Millsap also pitched in for this year's Muscular Dystrophy drive by going the distance as pitcher in a 101-inning benefit softball game.
  • Don Nay
  • As director of the San Diego Port Authority, he controls shipping and waterfront activity along the San Diego Bay from Shelter Island south to Chula Vista.
  • MJ. Lagies
  • The recent retirement of Municipal Court Judge Frank Nottbusch was prompted in part by two exposes, one on abuses on the county marshall's office, the other on ticket fixing, written by this investigative reporter for the Evening Tribune.
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  • Michael Newman
  • A former Rhodesian consul and editorial writer for the Union, he now manages and sets the editorial tone of the Southern Cross, San Diego's Catholic weekly.
  • Shirley Wood
  • An elementary school teacher, she was the only non-scientist on the city committee studying the political hazards of genetic research at USCD's medical school.
  • Archie Payne
  • Community college administrator by day, manager and owner of downtown's Crossroads bar by night, he continues the club's 15-year tradition of live jazz.
  • Reverend David Farrell
  • The gay community's most lucid spokesman, he leads a flock of 200 homophiles at Golden Hill's Metropolitan Community Church.
  • Ron Zappardino
  • The corner of Third Avenue and Plaza Street downtown looks a little brighter since Zappardino, a former commercial pilot, joined with partners to open Frenchy Marseilles', a wood-and-plants cocktail lounge.
  • Paul Stevens
  • When Campbell Industries got caught in a financial slump, he was drafted to ut the shipbuilding firm back in the lack. Stevens has also taken on chores .is negotiator for the San Diego Symphony which is trying this year to restore itself to the good graces of COMBO, the city's performing arts fund.
  • Maryann Zones
  • Research assistant at Scripps Clinic, mother of five, and ardent soccer player, this indefatigable Ocean Beach resident divides her spare time among the community planning group, the state's coastal commission advisory board, and th|e O.B. community school and recreation center.
  • Don Smith
  • An original stockholder and president of the Del Mar Thoroughbred Club, he retired this month after 45 years of overseeing the annual 7-week horse racing season. This summer the track set nine attendance and gross receipt records and was one of only six tracks in the country where total betting averaged over $2 million a day.
  • Sandy Dutky
  • With the help of 100 fellow aficionados, she keeps an interest in folk music alive through the San Diego Folksong Society. The group, formed 25 years ago by singer Sam Hinton, provided musical accompaniment for the anniversary sailing of the Star of India last July.
  • Claude Gilbert
  • When San Diego State's football coach, Don Coryell, left to take over the St. Louis Cardinals, local fans worried that their favorite college team might be lacking leadership. But Gilbert, a former assistant coach, has kept the Aztecs among the country's most closely watched teams.
  • Ray and Dan Hamel
  • Owners of a Mission Beach cyclery shop, they put skateboard wheels on rollerskates and started one of the biggest fads to hit Southern California since surfing: 'round-the-clock roller skating.
  • Dick Bass
  • Symphony directors raided the Los Angeles Philharmonic this year to bring Bass here to manage the 85 musicians who comprise our orchestra.
  • Dr. Al Anderson
  • He heads the city's Convention and Tourist Bureau, a group of professionals who must take much of the credit for attracting visitors and keeping our economy afloat.
  • Reverend George Walker Smith
  • No single member keeps the Board of Education in the public limelight more than the outspoken Smith, who doubles as pastor of Golden Hill Presbyterian Church.
  • Will Boulet
  • With help from the city's park and recreation department, he staged five free jazz concerts at various locations throughout the summer.
  • Mike Jones
  • Architect by profession, guardian of the city's historical landmarks by passion, Jones almost single-handedly convinced the city council to restore downtown's Horton Plaza to its original turn-of-the-century design.
  • David Creigh
  • The Seder-Creigh Gallery, an especially good private art showcase, is managed by this Coronado attorney, who has this year displayed the work of artists Ronald Davis and Keith Sonnier.
  • Joan Casale
  • President of the local chapter of the National Organization for Women (NOW), Casale went after media executives by compiling two surveys on the public portrayal of women by television and newspapers
  • Tom Metzger
  • As state-wide organizer for the Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, he kept the fiery issue of the Camp Pendleton barracks attack alive in newspapers, magazines, and radio talk-shows across the country.
  • Auggie Felando
  • A maritime attorney and manager of the American Tunaboat Association, he had a busy year negotiating with boat crews, environmentalists, and the federal government over the new laws governing tuna fishing.
  • Mauvorneen O'Connor
  • If a senior citizen high-rise breaks ground as part of the downtown redevelopment project, much of the credit will go to this member of one of San Diego’s most active families.
  • Phemie Warren
  • She brought the Radiothon method of fundraising to San Diego this year and left the symphony $58,000 richer.
  • Keven Munnelly
  • As the city's endowments officer, he has convinced a number of San Diegans to give or will to the city plots of land, restorable houses, and sums of cash.
  • Roy Potter
  • Whatever political clout remains vested with downtown's businessmen is delivered by Potter, the executive director of San Diegans, Inc.
  • Michael Lane
  • The county's methadone maintenance program was almost single-handedly de-funded by this admitted heroin addict who has publicly argued for radical therapy for junkies.
  • Harvey Furgatch
  • One of this city's few monied liberals, he led the fight against renewing its low-cost lease obtained by the San Diego Rowing Club on San Diego Bay. His long-time support of Governor Jerry Brown resulted in Furgatch's appointment early this year to the state Horse Racing Commission.
  • Hugh Boyle
  • As president of the San Diego Teachers Association he led. a four-day strike against the city's schools. For his role in the labor dispute, the first of its kind, Boyle was fined $4,000 and sentenced to 10 days in jail, both of which are now under appeal.
  • R.L. Burns
  • This San Bernardino industrialist moved his firm to San Diego and his family into the expansive La Jolla Farms estate once owned by Earl Gagosian of Royal Inns fame. In a matter of weeks, Burns had pledged over $120,000 to local charities.
  • Jacquelyn Littlefield
  • Although live performances have been sporadic of late, she manages to keep the doors of her elegant Spreckels Theatre open for touring plays and musicials.

Lee Grissom

Sponsored
Sponsored

He has pushed the San Diego Chamber of Commerce into the public eye by hiring an able staff and tackling major issues. At the same time, the 35-year-old urban planner has used the chamber as a power base from which to launch an assault on elective office.

  • Alfonso Macy
  • Along with fellow architect Jon Henderson, Macy spent five months and invested $15,000 to restore lower 5th Avenue's Yuma Building, a classic Victorian three-story, for use as an office.
  • Norma Freeman
  • Nationwide attention was focused on San Diego when she led a group of parents in trashing the shelves of a pornographic bookstore and picketing a Lakeside theater to protest the spread of "chicken porn."
  • Fritjof Thygeson
  • He helped lead two frontal assaults on San Diego Gas and Electric by opposing the utility's planned multimillion dollar rate increase and pushing for a moratorium on the proposed Sundesert nuclear power plant.
  • Sister Winnie Smith
  • For 28 years she's directed God's Extended Hand Mission—a non-denominational soup kitchen that serves over 700 free meals a week from its F Street storefront.
  • Melvin Freilicher
  • Political pamphleteer, editor, and artist, he helped found the United Artists Coalition, a group of San Diego artists from different media.
  • Eleanor Antin
  • This self-described "post conceptual" artist often leaves audiences gasping at the completion of her multi-media performances. A professor of visual arts at UCSD, her portrayal of nurse Florence Nightingale shocked the well-heeled crowds attending a fundraiser for the La Jolla Museum last month.
  • A.W. Coggeshall
  • Dressed in a brown workshirt and boots, he seems anything but a 71-year-old millionaire who's trying to bring live performances to his recently purchased California Theatre.
  • Det Merriman
  • A Rupert Murdock-like takeover of the ailing monthly magazine North County Living was consummated early this year by this young publisher. He also owns Applause magazine and Eucalyptus Productions, a typesetting and graphics business.
  • George Mitrovich
  • When he's not advising Supervisors Roger Hedgecock or Jim Bates, this avid Democrat is busy shuttling celebrities (Jerry Brown, Jimmy Carter, Gloria Steinem) into town for appearances before his City Club.
  • Elinor Oatman
  • The first woman to sit on the board of directors of San Diego Trust and Savings, and a former president of the Fine Arts Gallery, this San Diego native is an overseer of UCSD and a director of USD's School of Business.
  • Bill Bellville
  • This year he added a second downtown dinner theater, the refurbished Tower Bowl on Kettner and C Streets, to a growing list of downtown properties. Bellville, who's referred to by his employees as "downtown's one-man redevelopment project," started the meal and musical combination two years ago at the Hotel San Diego, which houses his Broadway Dinner Theatre.
  • Lee Bartell
  • This 67-year-old communications entrepreneur came out of semi-retirement by transforming ailing KDEO radio (now KMJC) into a top contender in the tenny-bopper market. His number-one opponent is now KCBQ, a bubble gum station whose rise to the top in the 1960s, ironically, was masterminded by Bartell himself.
  • Al Hughes
  • Despite the protests of Hughes and his Citizens Action Group, Imperial Beach Mayor Bert Stites and councilman Henry McCarty pushed ahead with a beachfront redevelopment plan for their city. The controversy prompted a special recall election in which the two officials were voted out of office.
  • Hope Shaw
  • That our only all-jazz radio station (KSDS-FM) finally made it to stereo has much to do with her work in the telecommunications department at San Diego City College. When she wasn't busy helping chief engineer Jim Dark round up the money for a new transmitter and other necessary gear, Shaw kept busy supervising projects such as the recording of performances by local jazz musicians for broadcast.
  • Bea Evenson
  • When the city condemned Balboa Park's Food and Beverage building, a remnant of the 1915 World Exposition, she founded the Committer of 100 which raised funds to rebuild it. This year the committee, which now boasts 1,800 members, turned its attentions to the park's neglected organ pavilion.
  • June Gutfleisch
  • Having charmed the city's redevelopment board into giving her the Knights of Pythias building on a dollar-a-year lease, she is now organizing the Intercultura! Council of the Arts and planning workshops for seniors, the handicapped, and school children.
  • Jan Hintzman
  • She spent the first six months of 1977 fighting for creation of a neighborhood park in the residential area south of San Diego State. Rolando-Clay Park, as the two-acre plot will be called, was approved by the city council in July.
  • Danny Millsap
  • Professional boxing and wrestling made a comeback at the "New Coliseum" under his own brand of promoting. Millsap also pitched in for this year's Muscular Dystrophy drive by going the distance as pitcher in a 101-inning benefit softball game.
  • Don Nay
  • As director of the San Diego Port Authority, he controls shipping and waterfront activity along the San Diego Bay from Shelter Island south to Chula Vista.
  • MJ. Lagies
  • The recent retirement of Municipal Court Judge Frank Nottbusch was prompted in part by two exposes, one on abuses on the county marshall's office, the other on ticket fixing, written by this investigative reporter for the Evening Tribune.
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4S Ranch Allied Gardens Alpine Baja Balboa Park Bankers Hill Barrio Logan Bay Ho Bay Park Black Mountain Ranch Blossom Valley Bonita Bonsall Borrego Springs Boulevard Campo Cardiff-by-the-Sea Carlsbad Carmel Mountain Carmel Valley Chollas View Chula Vista City College City Heights Clairemont College Area Coronado CSU San Marcos Cuyamaca College Del Cerro Del Mar Descanso Downtown San Diego Eastlake East Village El Cajon Emerald Hills Encanto Encinitas Escondido Fallbrook Fletcher Hills Golden Hill Grant Hill Grantville Grossmont College Guatay Harbor Island Hillcrest Imperial Beach Imperial Valley Jacumba Jamacha-Lomita Jamul Julian Kearny Mesa Kensington La Jolla Lakeside La Mesa Lemon Grove Leucadia Liberty Station Lincoln Acres Lincoln Park Linda Vista Little Italy Logan Heights Mesa College Midway District MiraCosta College Miramar Miramar College Mira Mesa Mission Beach Mission Hills Mission Valley Mountain View Mount Hope Mount Laguna National City Nestor Normal Heights North Park Oak Park Ocean Beach Oceanside Old Town Otay Mesa Pacific Beach Pala Palomar College Palomar Mountain Paradise Hills Pauma Valley Pine Valley Point Loma Point Loma Nazarene Potrero Poway Rainbow Ramona Rancho Bernardo Rancho Penasquitos Rancho San Diego Rancho Santa Fe Rolando San Carlos San Marcos San Onofre Santa Ysabel Santee San Ysidro Scripps Ranch SDSU Serra Mesa Shelltown Shelter Island Sherman Heights Skyline Solana Beach Sorrento Valley Southcrest South Park Southwestern College Spring Valley Stockton Talmadge Temecula Tierrasanta Tijuana UCSD University City University Heights USD Valencia Park Valley Center Vista Warner Springs
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