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Comedy and Tragedy: The Two Faces of Bud.

The generally accepted consensus among Scorsese proselytes cites this sequence, from John Huston's Reflections in a Golden Eye (1967) as Robert DeNiro's prime source of inspiration behind Travis Bickle's legendary mirror scene in Taxi Driver.

The following findings are about to throw film history a curve ball. First off, I finally get to ape one of Lickona's devastating "Foto Funnies" posts. (I'm much lazier than Matt, who would never allow closed-captioning to get his joke across.) After decades of eye-straining research, the truth behind the source of Travis' psycho-soliloquy can at last be revealed. The following scene was lifted verbatim from Michael Gordon's relatively obscure 1965 Rock Hudson/Leslie Caron romantic comedy, A Very Special Favor.

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You know He's seen it. He sees everything. I'd wager there's a 35mm dye-transfer print in His collection. While the psychic violence against women plays perfectly into Marty's oeuvre, we'll leave the gay subtext, and Hudson's yarmulke-styled haircomb, for more unorthodox minds to ponder. (Someone call Mark Rappaport.) I have it on good authority that Marty is a Larry Storch-ophile; for years He's been wanting to direct Agarn, a big screen, R-rated, revisionist reboot of the classic sitcom, F-Troop, but board room croupiers Harvey Weinstein and Graham King refuse to roll the dice.

I can see my blurb on the one sheet: "Scorsese puts the F in F-Troop!"

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Comments

Matthew Lickona Dec. 5, 2011 @ 11 a.m.

Marks, you magnificent bastard, they don't make rabbit holes deep enough. Where do you find this stuff? Anyway, good on ya.

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Colonna Dec. 8, 2011 @ 3:25 a.m.

Larry Storch was a woman beater? HEHEHEHEHE!

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