Poetry

Poetry

Four poems

On a Pair of Dice We are little brethren twain, Arbiters of loss and gain, Many to our counters run, Some are made, and some undone: But men find it to their cost, Few are ...

Poems of Catullus: Four Classic Translations

Catullus: LVIII by R. C. Trevelyan My Lesbia, that Lesbia, who alone Catullus loved More than himself and all who are most dear to him, Now in cross-roads and alleys trading her charms Fleeces the ...

"Horace: Ode I.25" and "Atalanta and Hippomenes"

Horace: Ode I.25 How infrequent now the insistent tap Of bold young fingers at your well-latched sash. No sleepless nights for you: the door that once Rocked loose and lively on an easy hinge Clings ...

From “Echo and Narcissus,” Metamorphoses 3.351-399

When Narcissus had just turned sixteen he looked as much a young man as a boy. Many girls, many boys wanted him badly, but (in his lean body was such cold pride) that no girls, ...

A Memory of Manaus

— For Loren and Janie Slye We’ve come by boat upriver some nine hundred miles along the Amazon, and reached its origins, the meeting of the Solimões and Negro waters, confluent but not commingled, flowing ...

“Off the Pond” and “Stardust”

Off the Pond Sunset off the pond, uncountable sparks; Faces. Blood-fall color of oak shimmering On the path — rough, cheeks of grandfather arch Along the trail to the pier’s end. Standing Out over the ...

“Insomnia & So On” and “Against the Glass”

Insomnia & So On Fat bed, lick the black cat in my mouth each morning. Unfasten all the bones that make a head, and let me rest: unknown among the oboe-throated geese gone south to ...

“The Fault Along the Floor” and “White Pocahontas”

The Fault Along the Floor The fault along the floor between these molten beds which we have made, to unmake, and in which we must lie still until the quake has passed us, and a ...

Two poems by the bright light of the Augustan Age of English poetry

The Quiet Life Happy the man whose wish and care A few paternal acres bound Content to breathe his native air In his own ground. Whose herd with milk, whose fields with bread, Whose flocks ...

From “A Valediction of My Name, in the Window”

I. My name engraved herein Doth contribute my firmness to this glass, Which ever since that charm hath been As hard, as that which graved it was; Thine eye will give it price enough, to ...

“Jane Eyre” and “The Elgin Theater”

Jane Eyre “I’d like you to meet my books,” you said on our very first date, on the first of June, when you introduced me to all the books you’d read, who must have approved ...

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