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The Center on Policy Initiatives, working with 2012 U.S. Census Bureau data just released, says that the top-earning 20% of households raked in half of all income in the county, as inflation-adjusted income declined. Almost 30% (28.4%) of persons working full-time, all year, earned less than $30,000, which is the amount necessary for living self-sufficiently in the county.

Some 123,000 full-time or part-time employees fell below the $11,945 poverty line for individuals. The poverty rate at 15% is much higher than the pre-recession 11.1%. Groups hit the hardest by poverty are African Americans, Latinos, and the cities of El Cajon, San Marcos and Escondido.

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Comments

shirleyberan Sept. 19, 2013 @ 1:57 p.m.

Don - the reason people get into bad relationships is nobody makes a living wage.

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Don Bauder Sept. 19, 2013 @ 2:35 p.m.

shirleyberan: In San Diego, not enough people make a living wage. Best, Don Bauder

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jrdad Sept. 19, 2013 @ 2:03 p.m.

Don - I've been making the same salary for the past 6 - 7 years. For the sake of argument let's say $50,000.00 a year. In real terms how much have a pay decrease have I taken. I'm curious to know how bad it really is. Thanks!

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viewer Sept. 19, 2013 @ 8:51 p.m.

So you're just trying to mistify us all, by giving out ficticious numbers.~

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Don Bauder Sept. 20, 2013 @ 7:23 a.m.

viewer: Who wants to announce his/her actual salary? Best, Don Bauder

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jrdad Sept. 20, 2013 @ 9:44 a.m.

Don - thanks! Besides viewer doesn't need to know. Regards, jrdad

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John Kitchin Sept. 20, 2013 @ 10:22 p.m.

The average American makes $50 an hour, or $100,000 a year, per IRS, and we do not know for sure if they make that, but we DO know for sure that they pay taxes on that. The average San Diegan, $30,000 a year. The REAL rate of inflation, not the fictional government indexes, is 100% the past few years, so money is worth half as much as 3-4 years ago. Prof. Kitchin.

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Don Bauder Sept. 21, 2013 @ 7:37 p.m.

John Kitchin: You are pulling my leg again. Inflation is not 100%. Only a small percentage of Americans make $100,000 a year. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Sept. 19, 2013 @ 2:34 p.m.

Kelly Cunningham, economist for the National University System Institute for Policy Research says that inflation has gone up locally 11% in the last six years, so if your salary has remained constant, you are down 11%. Cunningham cautions that this is the minimum you are down, because the official figures understate inflation. Best, Don Bauder

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jrdad Sept. 19, 2013 @ 4:49 p.m.

Don - Thanks - I appreciate the input. Shirley - I've been putting 25% of my gross into our 401K for close to 8 years and with the big 60 just around the corner I still can't see how retiring at 65 is an option. regards jrdad.

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Don Bauder Sept. 19, 2013 @ 7:36 p.m.

jrdad: Many people who intended to retire at 65 cannot do so. Inflation-adjusted median household income is down sharply since 1999 and flat since 1980. From 2009 to 2012, 95% of the monetary gains went to the upper 1%. Best, Don Bauder

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jrdad Sept. 20, 2013 @ 9:51 a.m.

Don: Sure would be nice to be in the 1% but I'm good where I am and your in-site is always helpful. Regards, jrdad

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Don Bauder Sept. 20, 2013 @ 3:15 p.m.

jrdad: It may be comfortable to be in the upper 1% but many, many of these people are sick. They have the money-grubbing disease. They die chasing money. Best, Don Bauder

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John Kitchin Sept. 20, 2013 @ 10:24 p.m.

My IRA is up to over 76 cents now, and I am 61 years old, no joke.

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Don Bauder Sept. 21, 2013 @ 7:38 p.m.

John Kitchin: Don't spend that IRA in one place. Best, Don Bauder

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shirleyberan Sept. 19, 2013 @ 3:58 p.m.

Jrdad- - don't spend for at least 3 years - save if possible - my husbands company is bankrup - we didn't know that would happen.

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Don Bauder Sept. 19, 2013 @ 7:37 p.m.

shirleyberan: Saving is always a sound idea. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Sept. 19, 2013 @ 7:38 p.m.

shirleyberan: Many people complain about bankruptcy laws as well as bankruptcy courts. Best, Don Bauder

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viewer Sept. 19, 2013 @ 8:59 p.m.

The LARGEST minority in the status of poverty = caucasional female blondes.

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Don Bauder Sept. 20, 2013 @ 7:25 a.m.

viewer: It's a good thing you aren't mayor. You would be out. Best, Don Bauder

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Twister Sept. 20, 2013 @ 8:50 a.m.

I pay the gentleman who cleans up my yard more than I make. Still, he lives in a trailer-park. But in a bigger trailer than my home. I have more "net worth," but he makes more money. But he works for a living and I don't. I'm "on" Social Security, and he's not. SS does not increase according to my actual losses to inflation--but, hey, that's what "modern" economics dictates. I'm thinkin' of movin' to AZ, where they don't tax you into poverty. Because, CA is "saying" to me, if you don't like the coolness, move your old a$$ out into the badlands where you belong. Slab-City, or BUST!

If we observe "old-fashioned" social mores, we don' need no stinkin' laws.

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Don Bauder Sept. 20, 2013 @ 3:17 p.m.

Twister: If you have a lot more net worth than he has, chances are you are definitely better off than he is. Best, Don Bauder

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Twister Sept. 20, 2013 @ 3:35 p.m.

"Twister: If you have a lot more net worth than he has, chances are you are definitely better off than he is. Best, Don Bauder"

I see I succeeded in making my statement neutral. Yes, I am better off than he is, largely because of Social Security. But we both live rather frugal lives (if one forgives my unforgivable extravagances). I don't, but I indulge in them anyway, mostly because of owning property that doesn't generate any income. He works for his money, and I respect him for it. Even though he performs "menial" labor, I pay him more than twice the minimum wage. If I can do it, Jackof-en-ze-boxe (an other giant corporations) should be able to.

So why not?

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Don Bauder Sept. 20, 2013 @ 7:11 p.m.

Twister: Excellent question. The reason that corporations will pay as little as they can get away with is that, since the 1980s, boards of directors have decided they have only one constituency: shareholders.

Formerly, reputable companies figured they had several constituencies: employees, communities, vendors, customers, and shareholders. Now the only concern is pleasing Wall Street with good earnings per share in the coming quarter. To do that, it is essential to hold employee costs down. Best, Don Bauder

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John Kitchin Sept. 20, 2013 @ 10:27 p.m.

Most "reputable" companies were forced out of business by George W. ("Whacko") Bush, and the rest are going down fast.

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Don Bauder Sept. 21, 2013 @ 7:41 p.m.

John Kitchin: You can find all kinds of reputable companies in the U.S. You are pulling my leg again. Best, Don Bauder

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Twister Sept. 22, 2013 @ 1:04 a.m.

I have trouble calling a company that grinds down its employees "reputable." It's not the kind of reputation I would want, were I a giant corporation (remember, they are now "persons," even though they never have to die--unless it is financially expedient to do so).

Just what is "reputable?"

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Don Bauder Sept. 22, 2013 @ 9:13 p.m.

Twister: I think of blue chip corporations who are socially responsible as reputable. Admittedly, there is a paucity of them now. It wasn't always so. Best, Don Bauder

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