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The publication Business Insider ranks "The 25 Most Dangerous Colleges in America." The data look at violent and property crimes from 2008-2011 in schools with more than 10,000 in enrollment. San Diego State is 7th with 29,187 enrollment, 27 violent and 575 property crimes per year. The publication says crime was down last year with only 5 forcible rapes, 3 robberies and 5 aggravated assaults. The University of California Los Angeles was listed as the most dangerous school. One administrator stated that crime in off-campus areas where university police have concurrent jurisdiction may swell totals invidiously.

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Comments

SurfPuppy619 Nov. 23, 2012 @ 9:21 a.m.

SDSU ha stoo much alcohol allowed in their Greek system. This is where the problems arise, frat parties + alcohol= problems

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Don Bauder Nov. 23, 2012 @ 10:14 a.m.

SurfPup: SDSU fraternities certainly have not helped the university's reputation. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Nov. 23, 2012 @ 9:30 a.m.

All of that and SDSU isn't even a top 15 party school any more.

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Don Bauder Nov. 23, 2012 @ 10:15 a.m.

tomjohnston: Is my alma mater, Wisconsin (Madison), still in the top 15? Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 23, 2012 @ 2:02 p.m.

I am surprised they still do the party school rankings. I know Chico had to stop their wild "Pioneer Week" because of the rowdy out of control behaviour....I would have kicked the frats out of the SDSU system, they were nothing but distractions and party zones.

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Don Bauder Nov. 23, 2012 @ 5:44 p.m.

SurfPup: But fraternity alums are donors. So are football fan alums. Best, Don Bauder

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Visduh Nov. 23, 2012 @ 10:30 a.m.

I find it interesting that UCLA is rated the worst, and yet you made no mention of the standing of USC. If you look at the communities surrounding those respective campuses, they could not be more different. And the area near UCLA is very upscale and ultra-expensive. I've never heard of the campus police having "concurrent jurisdiction", but I suppose it could be the case in some cities or states. I doubt that is something that exists in this state. But too often students are trusting and figure that in happyland, nobody is going to make them victims. And so, they are sitting ducks for muggers, rip-off thievery, and worse.

While the university administrators like to make parents think that they have gotten rid of booze on campus, it is one of the biggest lies being perpetrated today. Oh, they forbid it in the dorms and at the on-campus parties, but it is still there, and the usual approach by campus "authorities" is to see no evil, hear no evil, and speak no evil. Don't blame the frats for the booze related problems--the stuff is everywhere in and around the students, including being on campus.

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Don Bauder Nov. 23, 2012 @ 7:33 p.m.

Visduh: Good points. FYI, USC is not among the top 25. New Mexico State is second and Cal-Berkeley third. Best, Don Bauder

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Visduh Nov. 23, 2012 @ 7:50 p.m.

NMSU is SECOND on a ranking? That hapless operation never scores on any ranking. They are probably proud that anyone even knows the place exists. Now, could some of this have to do with proximity to the border? NMSU, for those who know nothing of it, is in "beautiful" Las Cruces, which is uncomfortably close to "wonderful" Juarez. Poor old NMSU, so close to Mexico, so far from heaven.

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Don Bauder Nov. 24, 2012 @ 8:23 a.m.

Visduh: Juarez propinquity may be a factor in this ranking. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Nov. 26, 2012 @ 6:27 a.m.

USC is not included because the list only includes public schools and not private institutions.

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 23, 2012 @ 2:06 p.m.

All the CC, CSU and UC schools have their OWN police departments, yes even the community colleges do. As for concurrent jurisdiction off campus, there must be some sort of boundary zone where the university police can still have jurisdiction, like say 1,000 feet or so.

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Don Bauder Nov. 23, 2012 @ 7:36 p.m.

SP: Yes, I assume concurrent jurisdiction applies to an area at the boundary of the campus. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 23, 2012 @ 2:09 p.m.

UC has jurisdiction over off-campus conduct when a student may be a threat to safety or security or the conduct involves academic work or University records, documents, or identification.

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Don Bauder Nov. 24, 2012 @ 8:27 a.m.

SP: When SDSU plays an away game and its fans are obstreperous, supposedly posing a threat to public safety, does such activity count in this ranking? I don't know. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Nov. 23, 2012 @ 2:45 p.m.

UCPD's have state-wide jurisdiction and authority. Their primary jurisdiction, obviously, are to UC properties and any land within a mile radius of campus boundaries http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/displaycode?section=edc&group=92001-93000&file=92600-92601

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Don Bauder Nov. 23, 2012 @ 7:37 p.m.

tomjohnston: I don't know whether there are concurrent jurisdictions of campus police in California. There are at other locations. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Nov. 24, 2012 @ 6:54 a.m.

Then apparently, you can't read either.

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Don Bauder Nov. 24, 2012 @ 8:29 a.m.

tomjohnston: Either can't read or don't read. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 23, 2012 @ 9:56 p.m.

Your link says their jurisdiction is the campus and one mile perimeter, not statewide, but ever GED cop I know claim they have state wide authority-they don't. No cop has state wide jurisdiction, not even the CHP.

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tomjohnston Nov. 24, 2012 @ 6:51 a.m.

read it again, surfpuppy619: " (c) as provided in Section 830.2 of the Penal Code.." "830.2. The following persons are peace officers whose authority extends to any place in the state:"

http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/cgi-bin/displaycode?section=pen&group=00001-01000&file=830-832.17

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Don Bauder Nov. 24, 2012 @ 8:45 a.m.

tomjohnston: SurfPup is up to bat next. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Nov. 24, 2012 @ 9:12 a.m.

There is no "up next", Don Bauder. It's part of the Califoria Penal Code: Chapter 4.5 Peace Officers Section 830-832.17 Read it or not, believe it or not, but it is what it is. There are peace officers whose authority extends to any place in the state, including CHP, UC and CS officers, among others. As I said, read it or not, believe it or not, but it is what it is.

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Don Bauder Nov. 24, 2012 @ 4:48 p.m.

tomjohnston: Be sure to make the point to SurfPup. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 24, 2012 @ 8:43 a.m.

SP: No cop has statewide jurisdiction? How about the AG? Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 24, 2012 @ 7:03 p.m.

AG's are not sworow"Peace Officers". They have no LE training whatsoever.

PC 830.2 is different from the more general and far more encompassing 830.1. I guess I would need to knwo what something other than "primary duty" means, or has been interpreted by the courts.

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Don Bauder Nov. 25, 2012 @ 5:57 p.m.

SP: Maybe, but AG's should be cops, although some look the other way at crime for political reasons. Naming no names. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Nov. 26, 2012 @ 6:13 a.m.

surfpuppy619, the AG is a sworn peace officer. From CPC 830.1 (b): "The Attorney General and special agents and investigators of the Department of Justice are peace officers, and those assistant chiefs, deputy chiefs, chiefs, deputy directors, and division directors designated as peace officers by the Attorney General are peace officers. The authority of these peace officers extends to any place in the state where a public offense has been committed or where there is probable cause to believe one has been committed."

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 26, 2012 @ 7:04 p.m.

surfpuppy619, the AG is a sworn peace officer. From CPC 830.1 (b):

I was not referring to the Elected AG, but Deputy AG's. That is why I was using the plural form.

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Visduh Nov. 23, 2012 @ 7:57 p.m.

This all brings me back to the notion that UCLA's administration, always uber-image conscious, will "sxxt a brick" at these stats. Oh, there will be great howling and protesting from that campus. (I'm hard-pressed to think of a university that is more image-involved, except Harvard.) Whether the data are fair or unfair, I cannot attempt to say, but I do know enough of that campus to predict a massive reaction. Wait for the sxxt to hit the fan.

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tomjohnston Nov. 24, 2012 @ 7:12 a.m.

I know a little of this campus also, Visduh, having a wife who earned her 2nd masters there in the 90's and 2 daughters who earned the undergrad and grad degrees there, the most recent being this past spring. There will be no "massive reaction". UCLA issued a statement and I don't expect anything else. http://www.businessinsider.com/most-dangerous-colleges-in-america-2012-11
The story will get no traction up here. Search the LAT or any of the local TC news websites. You'd be hard pressed to even find it mentioned. Same with Cal. Ask yourself this. How many people do you know who read Business Insider? Do you? Between the 2 of us, my wife and I subscribe to easily a hundred publication, probably more if we took the time to actually count them all. Business Insider is not one of them. As I said, over the last 15+ yrs, both mi wife and out 2 daughters were there and I can say that I would not hesitate at all to have them there. IMO UCLA is a safe as any campus and safer than most.

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Don Bauder Nov. 24, 2012 @ 8:49 a.m.

tomjohnston: That is certainly the opinion of the UCLA flack whose letter accompanied the rankings. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Nov. 24, 2012 @ 9:27 a.m.

Well, let me ask you this, Don Bauder. How often have you visited the UCLA campus. When was your most recent visit? How many of you family members matriculated thru UCLA? If any, how long were they there? And finally, have you read the most recent Clery Report for UCLA?

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Don Bauder Nov. 24, 2012 @ 5:03 p.m.

tomjohnston: You have to understand that I published a very abbreviated version of something that ran in another publication. My opinion of UCLA, New Mexico State, Cal-Berkeley and SDSU is irrelevant. There is no question that lists such as this can be misleading and invidious. In this case, different schools may have different methods of measuring and categorizing crime. But that doesn't mean such items should not be printed. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Nov. 25, 2012 @ 6:41 a.m.

Are you aware of what the Clery report and Clery Act are?

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Don Bauder Nov. 25, 2012 @ 6:01 p.m.

tomjohnston: The Clery Act forces universities receiving federal funds to keep and report crime statistics. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Nov. 26, 2012 @ 7:02 a.m.

The Clery Act is a Federal Statute that " requires all colleges and universities that participate in federal financial aid programs to keep and disclose information about crime on and near their respective campuses". They are all required to report this information and these stats using the same matrix for the express purpose of keeping schools from using different different methods of measuring and categorizing crime. The figures sighted in the Clery Report present a far more reliable picture of crime on campus than does an inflammatory "report" on a blog, which is what BI is. The stats are an average od FBI stats from 2008-2011 for public schools only with over 10,000 students enrolled and they have since admitted that crime numbers are elevated at schools where campus police jurisdiction includes neighboring off-campus areas, such as UCLA and Berkeley. I'm curious as to why you chose to report this particular list. A quick search reveals a plethora of most dangerous colleges. None of them not coming from business insider mention UCLA at all and many currently list Penn and Temple as the two most dangerous campuses, neither of which even make business insiders top 25. And yeegads, a few even list Harvard. What is the world coming to!!!! And BTW, maybe it's just semantics, but I wouldn't refer to an internet blog , which is what bi seems to be, as a "publication". Just my opinion. Opinions vary.

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Visduh Nov. 24, 2012 @ 11:26 a.m.

Perhaps my description of the reaction as "massive" was hyperbolic, but I really doubted that they would just let it pass. I expect the media in LA would rather not print bad news about their big universities, and while that statistic is unflattering, is not front page news.

No, I don't read Business Insider (in fact I don't even know what it is) and therefore cannot comment on the accuracy of their ranking. Generally I'm highly suspicious of those published rankings. Do I think that UCLA is a dangerous place? No, not at all.

Oh, and I have some knowledge of the campus, being a UCLA alum, and having a son who is also a UCLA alum. For a very long time, I've seen UCLA flackery masquerading as journalism, and have grown quite sick of it.

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Don Bauder Nov. 24, 2012 @ 5:08 p.m.

Visduh: You are correct that lists published by various media can be misleading. But lists comparing price-earnings multiples of midwest electric utilities, or lists of GDP growth in various European countries, can be misleading, too. That doesn't mean they should not be published. Seldom do you have apples to apples comparisons. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 24, 2012 @ 7:06 p.m.

Between the 2 of us, my wife and I subscribe to easily a hundred publication, probably more if we took the time to actually count them all You must have a shitload of money to burn if you are suscribing to that many publications.

I take the LAT and that is it. And only 4 days per week.

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Don Bauder Nov. 24, 2012 @ 8:42 p.m.

SurfPup: You may subscribe only to the LA Times, but you DO read the Reader -- at least the online edition. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Nov. 25, 2012 @ 7:19 a.m.

Well, surfpuppy, I guess that depends on what your definition of "money to burn" means. To me, it means wasted money. We don't consider it wasted money if it's entertaining or informative. Some of the publications had to do with our respective jobs so now that we are retired,some of those may not be renewed, though I suspect most will. And it's not as expensive as one might think. Haven't you every received one of those "special offers" in the mail, or more likely by email these days? Some of them are actually quite good. How about 3 yrs of SI for $9.99. Or 2yrs of Architectural Digest for $24.99 or Wired for $27.00 for 2 yrs. My best one is Rolling Stone. I have been reading it pretty much from issue one and have been a steady subscriber since college. Sometime around 1999 or so they ran of a lifetime for a couple of years, literally. A lifetime subscription for $99. I mean how do you ever beat that. Now, not everything can be found cheaply. The Economist is butt ugly expensive, a $100 even for a student sub. But to answer your original question, we don't consider it burning money. How much are your CBA dues for 2013? I read it will be $410. So yeah, we spend a little more than twice that, if you average it out. No big deal, we've done pretty well for ourselves.

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 25, 2012 @ 2:13 p.m.

I should have said is would be nice if money were no object.

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Don Bauder Nov. 25, 2012 @ 6:03 p.m.

SP: If tomjohnston subscribes to more then 100 publications, money may be no object. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Nov. 26, 2012 @ 7:19 a.m.

Well, as I have had some time to do a better mental calculation, I think that when averaging out the length of what most of our subs are and how much we paid, it's probably close to about the $500-$600 a year range at most. So money to burn, money no object? Yeah not so much. Were that the case, we would subscriber to The Economist, or Financial Times or a few other big ass subscriptions. Trust me when I say we don't pay a full sub price on anything. BTW, let me ask. How much does a good gym membership in SD go for these days? $50 maybe $75 a month? Up here a Gold's membership can run that much. That's $600- $900 a year. You gotta have a shitload of money to burn if you are spending that much. LOL

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Don Bauder Nov. 25, 2012 @ 5:55 p.m.

tomjohnston: Matt Taibbi alone is worth the price of Rolling Stone. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 25, 2012 @ 7:39 p.m.

Matt Taibbi is the very best financial reporter the nation IMO,

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Don Bauder Nov. 24, 2012 @ 8:47 a.m.

Visduh: Good call. UCLA indeed sent a protest letter which was printed with the item. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 24, 2012 @ 5:10 p.m.

Burwell: That is impressive -- 5.4 million readers is a lot. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 24, 2012 @ 8:44 p.m.

SP: A lot of publications would love to have 5.4 million readers. And Business Insider has a specialized readership -- a very desirable one. Best, Don Bauder

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Burwell Nov. 24, 2012 @ 8:33 p.m.

I think what Tom is trying to say is that a SDPD officer vacationing in San Francisco can legally carry a weapon and make an arrest if (s)he witnesses a random crime. If an SDPD Officer on official duty wants to arrest a suspect or fugitive in San Francisco, s(he) would have to first report his or her presence to the San Francisco Chief of Police and request assistance.

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Don Bauder Nov. 24, 2012 @ 8:46 p.m.

Burwell: I think reporting to the local police would be a necessity from a legal perspective. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 25, 2012 @ 2:15 p.m.

I think what Tom is trying to say is that a SDPD officer vacationing in San Francisco can legally carry a weapon and make an arrest if (s)he witnesses a random crime.

But so can ANY person in this state-even illegals- if they witness a crime they have the legal authority to make a private persons arrest. Just like the cop.

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Don Bauder Nov. 25, 2012 @ 6:04 p.m.

SP: But how many citizen arrests are there nationwide? Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 25, 2012 @ 7:38 p.m.

I don't know, but we all have the same "police powers", to make an arrest if a crime is committed in our presence.

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Don Bauder Nov. 25, 2012 @ 9:40 p.m.

SP: I have never exercised that power. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 26, 2012 @ 3:13 a.m.

Maybe not Don, but you are empowered to should you want to exercise that right...you never know

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Don Bauder Nov. 26, 2012 @ 8:48 p.m.

SP: If the malefactor is carrying a gun, you can get the hell out of there instead of making a citizens arrest. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Nov. 27, 2012 @ 8:03 a.m.

Hhahahhahahaha....hell yes!..........run for the hills if they are armed with ANY weapon!........

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Don Bauder Nov. 27, 2012 @ 9:47 p.m.

SP: But how do you know if they are armed? I would think about that before making a citizen arrest. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Nov. 26, 2012 @ 5:53 a.m.

burwell, that is not what I am trying to say. What I was saying is that despite surfpuppy619's claim to the contrary, there are sworn peace officers in California whose authority extends to any place in the state, as prescribed in PC Section 830. That's it. Nothing more, nothing less and nothing else.

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Burwell Nov. 24, 2012 @ 8:49 p.m.

Business Insider is owned by Henry Blodget. The SEC banned Blodget from the securities industry for life and fined him $4 million for fraud.

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Don Bauder Nov. 25, 2012 @ 6:13 p.m.

tomjohnston: Blodget has the ability to stir things up. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Nov. 25, 2012 @ 6:05 p.m.

Burwell: And then Blodget became a media star. Best, Don Bauder

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