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Down TJ way. Last night. November first was for the kids (like our Halloween).

Last night, the second of November, is for adults -- for the serious business of remembering, revisiting loved ones who have passed on.

And food's a big part of it.

The bread sits on the altar, next to a bowl of soup and a pair of skulls.

“It is pan de los muertos,” says Aldo Cayeros. “Bread for the dead. We put out the bread and favorite foods of loved ones who have died, so we can share it with them again.”

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Aldo is a student at the Autonomous University of Baja California (UABC). He and his friends are competing in a Day of the Dead contest for best altar here on Revolución.

“People our age are interested in this again,” says Aldo.

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The bread? Sweet.

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The decoration? Bones across the top, representing the one who’s passed on, and a teardrop in the middle to represent how much we miss them. Nice.

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But it's a celebration too.

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Lucy Tejera and her brother Jose make it a little punk

Students dress as La Calavera Catrina.

"La Catrina is probably the most famous figure in Day of the Dead celebrations," Aldo tells me. "It goes back to a humorous etching of an upper class lady made in 1913."

Huh. Now I'm seeing La Catrinas all over.

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Student Dayan Hernandez gets made up to be La Catrina

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Another Catrina

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Aristocratic Catrina

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Tall Catrina

Must say, all this food for the dead makes a man hungry.

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