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Job applicant Taylor Grey Meyer's earthy retort to the Padres has gone viral on the web, and been picked up by such publications as the New York Daily News. She reportedly has a Master's degree in sports management. According to media reports, she dropped out of California Western School of Law -- which is at least as good in its league as the Padres are in theirs -- because of an excessive debt load. According to media reports, she applied at least 30 times to the Padres for jobs -- even minimum wage ones. She was rejected, rejected, and dejected. Then she got an email from the Padres, telling her she could attend a Sports Sales Combine, a job fair that would cost her $495. She snapped, writing back, "I realize I may be burning a bridge here, but in the spirit of reciprocity, I would like to extend you a counter-offer to [perverse invitation redacted]." She ended her missive with a suggestion that can be reported, "Maybe I'm not the best fit for your company. But here's a nice fit, my foot in your a--."

For her, the letter was "cathartic," she says.

After her response zoomed around the web, sports executives thought she would be perfect for some kind of position in the sports industry, which is not known for stuffiness. "She's a hit here in Cleveland," a staffer with the Cleveland Gladiators says. "Our top guy with the Glads has been talking for 5 minutes straight how he wants to hire her...I love when people shake s--- up."

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Comments

David Dodd Aug. 15, 2012 @ 2:42 p.m.

Apparently, the Cleveland Indians organization employs foul-mouthed, under-qualified employees in their front office. Good to know that in spite of not having an active owner, the Padres organization could still see right through her lack of skills and also see past her MANY professionally-done photographs which emphasize her looks. A "Sports Management" degree is sort of like a "Political Science" degree. Easy to get, and mostly meaningless.

I wonder how she would react if she applied to the Reader with a degree in Philosophy, was turned down, and then sent a snotty email to the Reader whenever the Reader emailed her promotional offerings.

And keep this in mind: Ms. Meyer made her email go viral, no one else. She missed her calling, should have been in promotions, not management. Or maybe as a representative of talent. But certainly not a candidate to represent a sports organization. Other than in Cleveland, apparently.

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Don Bauder Aug. 15, 2012 @ 3:40 p.m.

First, it was the Cleveland Gladiators, not the Indians, according to my sources. I confess I have no idea who the Gladiators are, and didn't look it up. If she was the one who made sure her letter went viral, then she is obviously pretty good at promotion. That's what sports jobs entail -- promotion. You may look down your nose at a sports management degree, but on the other hand, sports management itself is not exactly a calling as high as nuclear physicist or brain surgeon. Best, Don Bauder

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David Dodd Aug. 15, 2012 @ 8:38 p.m.

My bad on missing the Gladiators somehow. They are a team in the Arena Football League. They would hire anyone who would be able to promote their sport, because it has been flailing in failure since its inception.

My point is this about her degree:

Back in the days when John McKay was head coach at USC (football program), there was a running joke. After the season was over, McKay would round up the senior class and give them a tour of the campus. Classrooms, library, other facilities. This was so they could say that they had actually seen them in their time at USC.

Sports Management is a very popular degree amongst "student athletes". As is "Sports Medicine" and "Sports Psychology", etc. You get my drift here. If you look at real managers in this field of employment, rarely do they have degrees in sports management. Generally, they have real business and/or real law degrees.

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Don Bauder Aug. 15, 2012 @ 8:53 p.m.

You may be right. My guess is that the top people in the field of sports management are those who have licked the boots of the billionaires that own the teams -- whatever their college degree. In my day (1950s) -- long before there was a field of sports management -- the athletes majored in physical education. Or signed up for a major in some pipe-course field, and took as many phys ed courses as they could get away with. In later years -- beginning in the 1960s and 1970s -- as you cite at USC, the athletes didn't even bother to attend class. Remember Chuck Muncie of the Chargers? He admitted that he had barely -- or perhaps not at all -- attended classes at Cal-Berkeley. I've forgotten whether he boasted he had never been to class or had almost never been to class. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 15, 2012 @ 6:46 p.m.

You are wrong Refried-ALL college degrees mean something and are not "meaningless" by any means.

If the Reader sent her a snotty letter asking for $500 to apply for a job I would send the Reader an F-bomb laden response for her.

I bet this DOES get her a job, more power to her, she has a backbone and a spine, and I applaud her.

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David Dodd Aug. 15, 2012 @ 8:26 p.m.

Applying to ONE employer 30 times and getting no offers is not spine. It borders on a personality disorder. And getting on a mailing list is something that happens in 2012. I am offered to attend seminars all over the world at my expense. I just move on. You may applaud her, I will applaud the Padres for seeing through this idiocy.

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Don Bauder Aug. 15, 2012 @ 9:03 p.m.

I went online and saw an interview with her tonight. She claims she has job offers. If we can believe her, possibly her stratagem worked. It was certainly crude, but may have been effective.Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 15, 2012 @ 11:23 p.m.

Refried, the Padres LIKED her response- did yiu miss that?

She was too kind, she needed to drop soem F-bombs.

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 1:55 p.m.

You mean the Padres liked her response, but still didn't hire her after all those turn-downs? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 15, 2012 @ 8:59 p.m.

I strongly disagree that ALL college degrees mean something. We have been talking much in columns and this blog about for-profit universities. The students pay very high rates, pile up debt, and wind up with degrees that are devoid of meaning -- particularly relative to getting a job and paying down the debt. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 16, 2012 @ 11:22 p.m.

When I say ALL college degrees, I am talking about all DEGREES from a reputable school, a CSU or UC, not a paper diploma mill like Bridgepoint. Women's studies and philosophy at SDSU might be viewed a worthless, but they're not. I should have clarified ALL degrees from any CSU or UC have value-at the very least it shows they endured a 4-6 process at a state school that is much harder to navigate than a private university.

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PadresFan99 Aug. 15, 2012 @ 3:04 p.m.

That girl deserves Cleveland. Let the punishment fit the crime.

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Don Bauder Aug. 15, 2012 @ 3:44 p.m.

It's overcast and rainy in Cleveland -- most of the time, it seems. I know. I lived there seven years. I went to one Browns game (through three quarters -- my wife was well into a pregnancy) and perhaps four Indians games, although I can only remember two. One was a season opener at which I froze my -- well, ask Taylor Grey Meyer.

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 15, 2012 @ 6:47 p.m.

And YOU deserve that low life team the Padres, PERNINNEAL LOSERS.

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Don Bauder Aug. 15, 2012 @ 9:13 p.m.

Listen, SurfPup, I have been rooting for low-life teams all my life. I grew up being a rabid Chicago Cubs fan. Ugh. I played on a high school basketball team that was a perennial loser. At the University of Wisconsin one year, the basketball team went something like 4-18. (That's when teams played fewer games.) I rooted for the Cleveland Indians although, as I said, I went to almost no games. I rooted for the Padres and Chargers in some pretty rough years. The only perennial winning team our family rooted for was the San Diego Sockers -- and they either folded or moved away. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 15, 2012 @ 11:21 p.m.

The San Diego Sockers were the best pro sports team San Diego has ever had.......they had a pro or semi pro basketball team for a while whose name I cannot recall, and the SD Surf Dawgs-a minor league baseball team. And whatever happened to the an Diego Gulls?? The hockey team!

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 2:01 a.m.

You're probably referring to the 2nd incarnation of the Gulls, the first was before your time. I saw the original version play when I used to visit SD as a kid. The team you mean came up here to Long Beach in the mid 90's and I think they were around until 2 or 3 yrs ago. The basketball tean was the San Diego Clippers. You should be able to figure out what happened to them. The soccers were one of the best i teams period. We saw them play outdoors a few times, but I don't recall seeing them in SD when the switched to indoor., but I'm pretty sure we must have when they played up here in the Forum. The problem was that the MISL folded. I think they played in some low budget league for a year or two, but then it all went way. Here's one for bonus points. Remember the San Diego Breakers from the IVA?? Here's a clue. He didn't play for the Breakers, but he is a San Diego native. So if you know who Byron Shewman is, you should be able to guess the sport.

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 9:13 a.m.

San Diego had had several pro teams give up. Around the time the San Diego Conquistadors, a pro basketball team, disappeared, there was a joke going around: various San Diego teams would be moved to the Philippines and renamed the Manila Folders. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 9:49 a.m.

Well, there was a good reason the Conquistadors disappeared. They were in the ABA. We saw some of their games in the fall of the 74-75 season because we lived in SD for the second half of 74. I remember seeing them in the old SDSU gym playing in front of maybe 3k people. As I recall, the original owner sold them in 75 and the new owner changed their name. The ABA pretty much fell apart in and 75 and the NBA brought the 4 best teams into the NBA. San Diego was NEVER a good basketball town. Besides the Conquistadors and the Clippers, don't forget that SD was awarded an NBA expansion franchise. The San Diego Rockets played in the Sports Arena, which I think had just opened, from 67-71. I didn't see them play much because I was at Berkeley while they were there, but they had some pretty good players, a couple of future HoF players actually, and a guy who would end up being a better coach than player. They ended up getting sold and relocated to Houston in a Large part due to poor attendance, much like the Clippers would do a few years later.

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 5:13 p.m.

The Rockets had a big star. I believe his name was Elvin Hayes. He went on to greatness with Houston. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 2 p.m.

Our children, my wife and I enjoyed watching indoor soccer. It is fast, players carom balls off the side, and there is lots of scoring. Outdoor soccer is too defense-oriented for me, but obviously rabid fans love it. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 16, 2012 @ 3:02 p.m.

No, the semi pro basketball team was a San Diego team, I am not speaking of the clippers...I forgot their name, they signed a rapper/singer who I do not recall as agimmick...

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 3:14 p.m.

Man, I have no idea. What time frame was this. Recently, years ago, a long time ago?? There have been some ABA team they existed in the last 4-5 years, but I don't recall anyone from music being involved. But I don't remember any others pro teams from yrs past not already mentioned.

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 5:23 p.m.

San Diego has had several semi-pro teams. Trouble is, they were in pro leagues at the time. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 9:53 p.m.

Your attempts at sports humor have left me completely underwhelmed...again

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 16, 2012 @ 9:50 p.m.

I cant recall the name it was probably about 10 yearsyago.....there is a team now called the San Diego Surf, but that is not the one I am speaking of....

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 10:12 p.m.

The only name I can come up with is the San Diego Wildcats, but they only started in about 2006 and only lasted a couple of years. Now there was a teamthat started back in the late 90's that still plays, but it's a women's team. There was also The San Diego Siege, but they were a woman's semi pro team that played only 1 season around 2005 or so. And that's it, that's all I can come up with. I have a handful of sports almaac sites I go to and none have anything else. Even emailed my BIL, who is a bigger sports guy than I am and he doesn't remember anything else either. Operating on the assumption that it is a men's team, I guess it's mystery until/unless you remember.

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 16, 2012 @ 11:28 p.m.

Wow-was this an obscure San Diego semi pro basketball team. The "San Diego Stingrays", and Rapper "Master P"

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 16, 2012 @ 11:29 p.m.

Says the changed their name to the Wildcats in season 2.....

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tomjohnston Aug. 17, 2012 @ 12:58 a.m.

Wildfire, not Wildcats. http://utawards.signonsandiego.com/wildfire.htm
Gotta admit that I had never heard of the IBL and I read right over San Diego Wildfire when I was looking at the list of all of the ABA teams. I knew about this incarnation of the ABA because the LA Stars were one of the original teams. They played at the Forum and had a couple of UCLA players on he team. This version of the ABA is a lot different. It's definitely semi-pro, with the emphasis on semi.They play in a lot of high school gyms and rec centers Up here there are a lot of pro celebrity summer leagues. I think some of them are probably as good if not better http://abalive.com/

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tomjohnston Aug. 17, 2012 @ 7:34 a.m.

Here are a coupe of lists for you. If anyone says that sports aren't big money, have them take a look at this list. It's a list of only developmental and minor sports leagues. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_...
And as for the ABA, the current iteration, here's a list of the teams that are or have been in the league. Remember this is just 1 league in 1 sport. Amazing!!! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category... And even more. Sports teams in the United States by league for just 5 sports. An incredible amount of money being spent in sports. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category...

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 5:17 p.m.

Put a rapper on your team to attract an audience? Why not a Doberman Pinscher or Captain Hook? Would they draw crowds? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 9:05 a.m.

Yes, following the Sockers was quite ego-massaging for our family. Our sons were playing soccer at the time. We went to a lot of games, and the Sockers won almost all of them, and won the title most years, too. But there was little fan support. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 10:14 a.m.

I knew they won a lot, so I decided to look it up: 2 NASL indoor and 8 MISL indoor Championships. Not too bad. Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't the 2000 US Olympic soccer teams train in San Diego, actually at the CV training complex? San Diego is apparently a big soccer town!!!

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 2:02 p.m.

I think in the years in which the Sockers were winning 10 championships they only lost once, and then went to the final game. Not sure if my memory is serving me right, though. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 3:02 p.m.

Pretty close. They won 5 in a row, lost the division semi final series in 86-87 to Tacoma 4 matches to, and then won the next 5 championships. Then the MISL folded after the 91-92 season. Here's a bit of odd trivia for you. The team that lead the league in attendance most years wasn't NY, LA, SD or even Chicago. It was Cleveland. Imagine that.

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 5:30 p.m.

Since it's very often raining or snowing in Cleveland, there isn't much for sports fans to do. Little sunshine, no beach, little hiking, etc. So you go to sports events. Cleveland Browns fans are rabid even when the team stinks. (Actually, the Cleveland Orchestra is in the Top Five; when I was there, 1966-1973, it was generally considered the best, topping NY Phil, Chicago Symphony, etc. Also, the Cleveland art museum is magnificent.) Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 6:12 p.m.

My mother was from the Cleveland area. My grand parents both worked for the steel mills in the area. My mother often spoke of her child hood there in less than fond terms for the area. We've been there 3 times. Once to attend my grandmother's funeral and twice to go to the Rock And Roll Hall of Fame Museum.

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Twister Aug. 16, 2012 @ 1:01 a.m.

$cr#w all professional sports. Support LOCAL boys and girls.

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 9:15 a.m.

For me, there was nothing more fun than watching my sons in youth soccer and Little League and Pony League baseball. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 9:59 a.m.

Growing up, both of our daughters played pretty much the same sports, even though they are 6 yrs apart. Softball, volleyball, soccer and, for a while, field hockey were their favorites. They were good in all of them, but I think softball was the favorite of our oldest and soccer our youngest. They weren't quite good enough to play in college, UCLA has had some pretty good teams, but they did play some club sports. Some of our best family times were going to the various sports tournaments. I think my wife and I had as much fun watching them play as the girls did actually playing.

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 2:06 p.m.

My youngest son used to announce the football and basketball games at Mesa College. I would attend as often as I could and enjoyed the games, particularly women's basketball. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 2:48 p.m.

I've always seemed to enjoy watching women's sports, in some cases more than the men playing the same sports. In fact, almost always more than the men. Imagine that.

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 16, 2012 @ 3:04 p.m.

I love womens V-ball, and always went to the game at SDSU (when they had a program) and also when I was in grad shcool in Michigan.

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 5:38 p.m.

I did watch some women's beach volleyball from the Olympics and enjoyed it immensely. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 5:42 p.m.

I'm pretty certain SDSU still has a volleyball program. They are usually one of the better teams in the MW conference and have been to the NCAA's several times. Not quite as good as USD; they are usually are a WCC powerhouse.

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 7:51 p.m.

Beach volleyball certainly takes amazing skill and quick reactions. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 18, 2012 @ 2:55 p.m.

SDSU had POWERHOUSE womens teams when I attended, and then they fried their coach Rudy Suwara .....I saw Rudy in the mid 90's at the local gym and he was coaching the Mens national team, awesome coach, wish I knew where he was today. SDSU haf awesome mens teams until they canned the mens program and I thought they canned women also but cant recall and am too lazy to look it up.

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tomjohnston Aug. 22, 2012 @ 12:20 p.m.

I think he's in his 70's now so he is probably retired. I know he quit donig clinics a few years ago. He and his wife still live down in SD. They have been avid golfers for a long time. I he is or at least used to be, a member of the Coronado Men's Golf Club. My brother-in-law is a member and remembers him there. He was an asst. coach in Atlanta in '96, but I don't recall whether or not he was in Barcelona in '92. You don't need to look up anything about the women's team. Their season starts this weekend with the Aztec Invitational. We may be there for at least one match, since Cal is one of the teams. I don't remember how long ago SDSU dropped men's VB, but my wife and I know someone who played there. He does TV now.

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 22, 2012 @ 11:55 p.m.

SDSU had powerhouse V-ball teams, both men and women. One of my classmates, Liane Sato, was the superstar on the womens team in the 1980's, and Rudy coached her....she is now th Vball coach at her alma mater Santa Monica HS.........she has a Bronze medal I think from the Olympics, while her brother has a gold V-ball medal.......

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tomjohnston Aug. 23, 2012 @ 4:32 p.m.

If you know indoor, at least So Cal indoor, then you know the Sato's. Up here, they are pretty much legendary and they are basically VB royalty at Samohi and SMC. Never figured out the whole UCSB to SDSU transfer by Liane. She was in SB one day and then she was gone so she had to sit the whole '84 season. One of her older brothers was on the men's team at the same time and she had been recruited by SDSU, but who knows; she's never said why she left UCSB. Her younger brother, Eric, was on the Seoul and Barcelona teams, gold in Seoul and bronze in Barcelona. Their oldest brother Gary was an asst on the men's team for both games so there were 3 siblings in the same sport 2 Olympics in a row. How cool is that. They were all setters, but Eric was easily the best. Karch says he's the best defensive players he's ever see. Scott played for the men’s team at SDSU, but I'm not sure where he is now. Glenn was an asst coach at USC and I think he's a teacher now. Eric was a private girl’s high school coach in San Diego for a long time. Won some State titles and sent some good players to college. He left a couple of years ago to start his own VB school. Gary was back as an asst coach for the men's Olympic team again this year. One of his kids has played on the junior national team for a couple of years now. Liane, Eric and Gary were inducted into Santa Monica College's Sports Hall of Fame last year and I read recently that Liane is going into the SDSU HoF this fall. As for being a powerhouse, yeah I think not so much. They had a title and a runner up about 30 yrs ago, but Pepperdine has probably had 1/2 dozen of each and put more players on the National teams than any other school. But the real volleyball powerhouse has ALWAYS been UCLA. Men's team has 19 championships and 6 runner-ups, has made all but 3 tournaments since 1970 and has winningest volleyball coach in the history of the NCAA. And the women have made the final 4 12 times, won 4 titles and have been runner-up 4 times. That's a Powerhouse program!!! BTW Don't forget that Rudy Suwara's first coaching job came as a UCLA Assistant Coach BTW2 Rudy Suwara's brother Ernie, 1964 Olympic team MVP, 4 time All-American and played on national championship teams in 1965 and 1967 at....UCLA. BTW3nephew Bill played at UCLA on 2 National Championship teams

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 23, 2012 @ 5:54 p.m.

Yes, there is serious V-Ball talent in SoCal.......one thing about Liane, she studied her butt off, she was VERY studious, outstanding student, and an excellent setter. Obviously I used to watch her and the teams games back in the 1980's..............

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tomjohnston Aug. 23, 2012 @ 7:52 p.m.

"Obviously I used to watch her and the teams games back in the 1980's" Well late 80's since she only played '85-86. I started watching probably around 75 or so when the IVA started. We also started watching UCLA around then and that's also around the time I started playing beach VB. The somewhere around the mid 80's, there was Team Cup Volleyball League, it was started by the same guy who started the ABA, who also just happened to be a member of the 1964 U.S. Olympic team. ALL of the best players played in it., Eric Sato, Steve Timmons, Karch, Sinjin Smith, Randy Stoklos, Mike Dodd, Tim Hovland. Pretty much all the top US players, indoor and beach, played. They played in the Forum on Tues and Thurs and you could get it on Prime Ticket, if you remember that. They only played in September, because of not wanting to conflict with all of the amateur teams and schedules, so we went to a lot of the matches. I think the league was around for about 10 yrs or so and if you like VB it was very cool.

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 5:36 p.m.

Women's basketball is a team game, I found -- rather like basketball when I played it in high school. (Don't get the idea I was good; I sat on the bench more than I played. Had the team been good, I wouldn't have made it.) Men's basketball seems more like a track meet -- guys going down the court and shooting. I watch the NCAA finals most years, but seldom watch NBA basketball. This year was an exception, only because of where I happened to be during the games. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 5:53 p.m.

As I believe was said else where, college basketball (men's) is a D league for the NBA, as with most sports. Not so with women's sports. Only 120 players in the WNBA and pay is structured. More players play over seas than in the WNBA and most WNBA players play overseas also. Same with volleyball and softball. Softball has the NPF, 4 pro teams with about 20 players each and they make around 5-6k for the summer. Many of them also play overseas; Japan has a fondness for American softball players. No pro volleyball anymore(indoor, not beach). Almost all of the National team players make a pretty good living paying overseas. That's the difference. The women aren't playing to get a shot a a multi million dollar paycheck like the men are.

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 7:55 p.m.

Because a team needs fewer players, salaries in the NBA are ridiculous -- at least the ones I have seen. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 11:27 a.m.

I can understand your sentiment, sort of. But that said, can't one do both? I played little league and pop warner and my parent were always there. But some of my best memories are also of going to Dodgers and Rams games when I was a kid. I mean what could possibly be more exciting to a little kid who likes baseball than to get a foul ball at a big league game and then at some point be able to have a Willie Mays or a Sandy Koufax sign it? Doesn't get any better than that. I don't think the two necessarily have to be mutually exclusive. Just my opinion. Opinions vary.

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 2:09 p.m.

When I was young, there was no Little League or Pop Warner. In high school, I would ditch school to see the opening Cubs game. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 2:46 p.m.

Don Bauder Unless you have been less than truthful about your age, you are incorrect. Pop Warner football has been around for over 80 years and Little League for over 70. Now I will grant you that they probably weren't around where you grew up because neither expanded nationally until after WWII, but they were in existence back then.

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 16, 2012 @ 3:07 p.m.

I came across a pic of Pop Waners grave last week, on the Stanford University campus-how weird is that.....I had to look him up again to find the connection, Warner and Rockne, there were the coaches who introduced modern football offenses......

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 5:15 p.m.

Yeah, Pop Warner was big time. I don't think he's buried in Palo Alto. According to this, he's buried in the family plot back east: http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=7989023

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 5:46 p.m.

Maybe we have a riddle here: who is buried in Pop Warner's grave? Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 5:54 p.m.

bigger riddle. What color was the horse?

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 7:58 p.m.

The horse was radish color. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 17, 2012 @ 8:17 a.m.

I guess you've never heard the joke. Pity

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Don Bauder Aug. 17, 2012 @ 12:21 p.m.

I wouldn't be surprised if I haven't heard the joke. I've missed a lot of them through the years. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 16, 2012 @ 9:35 p.m.

I just went back to the pic, it is a large stone "memorial", I thought he was buried there, but I guess it is just a memorial, but looks like the exact same thing you would see in a cemetery. The brass plaque says "In Memory of Glenn "Pop" Warner. I don't know what it is supposed t stand for except he was a Stanford coach.....

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Don Bauder Aug. 17, 2012 @ 7:17 a.m.

When will some university erect a large stone memorial to a nuclear physicist or neurosurgeon? Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 17, 2012 @ 8:58 a.m.

A rather silly comment, don't you think? Or was it instead a poor attempt at sarcasm? In either case, I would think that a nuclear physicist or neurosurgeon would more appropriately have a building named after then or at the very least a department. For example, I'm sure you've heard of a small company that started up in the Silicon Valley during the time I was In college. In fact, he is credited with helping give the area it's nick-name. Perhaps you even own some of it's stock, as we do. It's a little company named Intel, co-founded by Robert Noyce, who some might say made a rather significant contribution by inventing a little thing called the integrated circuit. A couple of years ago, his alma mater built a new science building and named it after him Or for about something a little closer to home, at my old school, how about Birge Hall. It is named after Raymond Birge, who was chairman of the physics department for more than 20 years. Ironically, the building houses the Physics department. While I only took the basic requirements in physics, Professor Birge was still well known on campus, even though he had been retired for many years.. Fortunately, Professor Birge was still alive when the new building was named in his honor. I'm sure that meant a lot more to him than some "large stone memorial" would have. I would guess that most school have some sort of designated area to celebrate the success in athletics. Most schools have some sort of hall of champions type memorial. The memorial should reflect the importance of the contribution to the university. In the grand scheme, I would say a piece of rock for athletes and a building for a scholar seems to be proportionately correct.

Just my opinion. Opinions vary.

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Don Bauder Aug. 17, 2012 @ 12:34 p.m.

I do have stock in Intel, but only 400 shares. Since in this market I buy stocks with yields of at least 3.5%, and mostly over 4%, I don't have many techs. (I bought Intel more than 20 years ago, I believe.) Also, the rapid obsolescence in tech leads to volatility that turns me off. As to names of buildings on campuses: how many are actually named for a big donor? And when will universities start selling naming rights to commercial companies: Coca-Cola College of Commerce, Jack Daniels Student Union, etc.? Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 17, 2012 @ 1:06 p.m.

Far more buildings are named for a big donor than for a scholar, probably because those donors are the ones that pay for the buildings to get built. To me that only heightens the magnitude of a building being named after some who actually accomplished something instead of donating a boatload of money to get their name on the building. Personally, I think if a Coca-Cola wanted to donate $50 million to Berkeley to get their name on the new School of Business building, I'd have no problem with it. Phil Knight has donated or pledged close to $500 million to the University of Oregon. I say good for them and if they name athletic building for him, the library for his mother, the law school for his father, and the basketball teams' arena for his son, well then good for him. Well worth it and a small price to pay in return for that kind of endowment.

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tomjohnston Aug. 17, 2012 @ 8:16 a.m.

Well, he was the coach who got them their only National Championship. It's in Pac 12 Plaza (formerly Pac 10 plaza, I guess). It's a little area between the baseball field and the football stadium. My wife and I have been to many a Cal-Stanford game, and to the Bank of the West Classic tennis tournament many times, and I have to admit that we've walked right past it without knowing what it was. But then again, it's Stanford and we we're Berkeley grads, so it's not really a big deal.

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Don Bauder Aug. 17, 2012 @ 12:44 p.m.

Well it's not a big deal to Cal grads, to be sure. But it's a shrine at which Stanford students worship, I assume. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 17, 2012 @ 5:35 p.m.

Hahahaha..you went to Cal?????? If so you know what "The Play" is, and you may know some players who were actually in it-as I do, such as Mariet Ford, whom I played Football with, along with Mariet Ford's brother Oren.......Ford went to Cal with the coach whose name I cannot recall but was using the pass oriented "run and shoot" offense, and Ford lead the Pac-8 (or was it teh Pac-10 then??) and nation in receiving the first 4 weeks of that season....then "The Play" the most famous play in college football history and one of the most famous moments in sports history....great stuff. Mariet was living in the SacTown area when he murdered his wife several years ago and is now in state prison. Mariet Ford set a CA Community College record in pass receptions, guy was a superstar, should have gone pro.

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 17, 2012 @ 5:50 p.m.

Here is a pic of the Pop Warner "monument", not memorial, but it sure looked like a memorial to me. A friend who went to Standord recently had just snapped the pic (not this pic) and posted it on her Facebook page where I saw it and assumed he was buried there. http://www.flickr.com/photos/wallyg/4018162134/

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tomjohnston Aug. 22, 2012 @ 11 a.m.

surfpuppy619, my wife and I completed out undergrad work in '72, just a few years before "the Play", so I don't think I even know anyone who was at school in '82. Everyone who watches college football knows about the play, and if you follow Cal, you probably know who Mariet Ford is, but do you know who Gary Tyrrell is, (probably the most famous one of all)?I have to admit, I didn't see it when it happened. Our youngest daughter was only about 3 weeks old at the time and she was pretty much commanding all of our attention at the time and I was probably sleeping at that time of the afternoon. Ford did go pro; he wasn't drafted, but signed with someone as an un-drafted free agent. But if I remember, he got cut during training camp. I read something during his trial that he played in the CFL, tried to get into the USFL and then finally got a real job. BTW, Ford is down your way, at Donovan.

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SurfPuppy619 Aug. 23, 2012 @ 12:12 a.m.

He is at Donovan?? Wow, small world. I remember the Cal Full Back from these years very well, because he was a big time weight lifter, and as a full back was the strongest player on the CAL FOOTBALL TEAM. I saw him at the weight room in the stadium-Memorial Stadium, the weight room was so sweet-beautiful, overlooked teh entire bay with a million dollar view....Tuggle was NFL drafted on I think the very last player, when they had a much larger NFL draft back then, I think the last pick was #425, that was john Tuggle. He died of cancer a few years after, very sad. CAL also had a guy we played HS football against who set nearly every HS running back and scoring record in the state, Mike Carnell probably still has the record for most touchdowns in a season at 44, he was averaging 4-5 touchdowns per GAME. I was shocked he signed with CAL, because CAL sucked back then and SC was far better for football and for his position. He started a few games as a freshman but flopped bigtime....Carnell was one of the best athletes I ever saw play.....

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tomjohnston Aug. 23, 2012 @ 7:05 p.m.

Yeah I think everyone who follows Cal FB remembers John Tuggle. Not a big guy probably around 6'1'' or 6'2'' and maybe 220. he was said to have been able to bench 435.I think he was the rushing leader his last 2 yrs. He was actually the last pick, 12th round, 335th by the Giants But I think what most people remember is obviously the cancer but also that he has an award named for him: the Lombardi committee created the 'John Tuggle Award' for overcoming extreme adversity, dealing with overwhelming challenges and yet still succeeding. It was also cool that the Giants paid his whole contract, even when he couldn't play and continued to pay his insurance until he died. I barely follow HSFB down here at all, so I don’t know about anything about Norcal and honestly don’t remember Carnell. According to the archive he only had 130 yds rushing. and was gone after 1 season. It’s not all that common for somebody is great in HS to be a dud in college. I’m guessing he wasn’t even recruited by USC and I can give you 2 pretty good reasons why. 1- Charles White, 1976-1979, Heisman Trophy winner(among other awards) in 1979. 2-Marcus Allen, 1978-1981, Heisman Trophy winner(among other awards) in 1981, college football HOF 2000, pro football HoF 2003. Yeah, I’m thinking Coach Robinson did pretty well with what he had. And I don’t know that Cal sucked back then. They won the Pac10 in ‘75 with Chuck Muncie and finished in the top 25. The problem was when Mike white left for the NFL after the ’77 season, they promoted the bozo from OC to HC. He had decent teams in ’78 and ’79 when he still had some of White’s recruits, but once he was on his own at Cal, he sucked.

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 5:42 p.m.

Didn't Rockne coach the Gipper, whom Ronald Reagan made famous? (I have heard that Gipp was actually a drunkard and an inveterate gambler. But he has been lionized in history.) Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 6:04 p.m.

Yeah, Rockne coached George Gipp, who was a very good football player and is still in the ND record books. But why even bring up an unsubstantiated rumor about some one who has been dead for over 90 yrs, that has absolutely no context in this conversation? That was just bush league Bauder, plain and simple and I would have thought you were better than that. Guess I was wrong about you...again.

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 8:04 p.m.

I never said I was better than bush league. I have already confessed that my basketball skills were considerably less than stellar. But I will throw out another gratuitous insult to which you will react hostilely: why don't we call it Bush league, as in Duhbya, rather than bush league? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 9:45 p.m.

It was about the other Duhbya. Unless...hmm...no. You're too articulate. Best, Don Bauder

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Duhbya Aug. 16, 2012 @ 9:50 p.m.

Plus, his moniker was sans the "h". I added one for effect.

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Don Bauder Aug. 17, 2012 @ 7:22 a.m.

If George Bush would have added an "h" to his name, as you did, it would be Bushh. I think it's rather descriptive of the degree of openness during his two terms. Best, Don Bauder

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Duhbya Aug. 17, 2012 @ 7:45 a.m.

I'm envisioning a couple of L's and an IT in there somewhere, also. But your characterization is sublime.

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Don Bauder Aug. 17, 2012 @ 12:48 p.m.

Yes, that moniker would be even more descriptive. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 9:51 p.m.

You can call it what you want, I didn't vote for either of them. And Ididn't react hostilely., because it wasn't about me. I simply stated that I thought, or used to think, that someone of your stature was better than that. Like I said, guess I was wrong.

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Don Bauder Aug. 17, 2012 @ 7:27 a.m.

Normally, I would not insult a football player, because I might get the stuffing beaten out of me. (I'm a coward.) But if the Gipper has been dead 90 years, as you say, I figure he is fair game. Sorry to offend you. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 17, 2012 @ 7:48 a.m.

As I said, it wasn't about me so it has no affect on me. Something said on a blog has absolutely no meaning to me, good or bad, because it's, well it something said on a blog. And as I have long said, I think ANYONE who lets a comment made by someone on the internet, someone they have no relationship with, affect them in either way, good or bad, has other issues that they need to worry about. Rather, as I said above, my comment was was about you. And really, does it matter if someone is dead or alive? To say something about someone who is dead, no matter how long, that you wouldn't say if they were alive is, well as I said it's bush league. BTW ,Rule #6: Never apologize — Its a sign of weakness. But then again, it's only the internet, so it shouldn't mater to you at all. LOL

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Don Bauder Aug. 17, 2012 @ 1 p.m.

Through the years, beginning pre-grade school, I have had people sternly lecture me, "If you can't say something nice about someone, don't say anything at all." But how could I be a journalist if I followed such advice? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 17, 2012 @ 12:53 p.m.

The gratuitous remark about the Gipper was also not about you. So from where did the umbrage arise? Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 17, 2012 @ 1:19 p.m.

There's no umbrage. As I have said, it is disappointment... in you. As you just said, it was a gratuitous remark, one that earlier in your career, I don't think you would have even thought about making. I have no problem with things that are "not nice" being said, if they happen to have some basis in the truth, or even if they just expressed as being someone's own personal opinion. But when someone makes such a remark, simply because they "heard" something, well I think that's entirely different. Tell me, when you were a senior columnist would you have turned in a story containing such a remark, one that you "heard". Or when you were financial editor, would you have allowed a story to go to print with that type of remark, based only on what a reporter "heard"? Just my opinion. Opinions vary.

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Don Bauder Aug. 17, 2012 @ 7:24 p.m.

The remark about the Gipper being a lush and a gambler is perfectly acceptable for a columnist. It enhances readability, as your indignant response shows. I would have encouraged it in my own columns and others'. I think Gipp is fair game for reporters, too. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 16, 2012 @ 5:09 p.m.

I'm 76. There was no Pop Warner where I grew up, a suburb of Chicago. Little League came to our suburb when I was in my teens...too late for me to be eligible. But both may have been in operation elsewhere. Best, Don Bauder

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tomjohnston Aug. 16, 2012 @ 5:24 p.m.

No may have been. They were. Pop Warner started in 1929 and Little Leagues in 1939.

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Twister Aug. 17, 2012 @ 8:29 p.m.

Actually DOING things develops body and mind. Spectating, well, it's ok for some, but if used as a SUBSTITUTE for self-actualizing and growing, it can, and often does, develop into an obsessive hangup. This is true for a lot of sports fans. It is not for nothing that "fan" is short for fanatic.

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Don Bauder Aug. 18, 2012 @ 7:12 a.m.

Agreed: couch potatoes are the greatest of hypocrites. Look at the ads that suggest that sitting in front of a TV and watching a football game makes you a macho person. Balderdash! I have always said that one of the most macho activities is birdwatching. These hardy folks crawl through briars, hang on cliffs, hike for miles to spot birds. But have you ever seen an ad suggesting that birdwatching is macho? Best, Don Bauder

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Duhbya Aug. 18, 2012 @ 6:04 p.m.

Define "bird". I did a lot of bird-watching in London without ever having to leave the park. Guess that makes me a hypocritical "bench potato".

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Don Bauder Aug. 18, 2012 @ 9:23 p.m.

Yes, but did you see exotic birds in that London park? Or did you see the same old birds every day? Best, Don Bauder

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Duhbya Aug. 19, 2012 @ 5:22 a.m.

I cannot be certain about seeing the same birds repeatedly, because I was in Hyde Park. As for exotic, I did observe a few peregrines. Interestingly, the blokes escorting those specimens apparently felt obliged to flip their own birds back at me.

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Don Bauder Aug. 19, 2012 @ 12:12 p.m.

You mean they tossed you a tufted titmouse? That's flipping a bird. Best, Don Bauder

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Duhbya Aug. 19, 2012 @ 2:01 p.m.

Regardless, I shouldn't grouse about it.

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Twister Aug. 18, 2012 @ 8:30 a.m.

Don't get me started on "macho." Oops--you already did!

Why are women, for example, so under-served and over-#u^ed by males? For ten thousand or so years, about when men started the enslavement process euphemistically called "domestication," of plants, other animals, other men, and women (increasingly and exponentially over time), they started confusing bravery with bravado, courage with brutality, and image with substance.

And the beat goes on. Is it any wonder that women are drawn to romantic fantasies where men bravely fight for their right to copulate?

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Don Bauder Aug. 18, 2012 @ 3:42 p.m.

Remember, man has been evolving for millions of years. I would guess that the societies of our predecessor creatures were male-dominated and brutally sexist. Best, Don Bauder

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Twister Aug. 18, 2012 @ 11:33 p.m.

Hobbes' statements weren't necessarily so--in fact, he had utterly zero evidence upon which to base his claims.

Do you really believe that humans have evolved and are evolving into better and better creatures? By "better," and evolutionary biologist would (or should) say "better adapted" to the species' environment. Just about any trend line I can think of is down, not up.

Or do you believe that organisms progress or get better over time by the process of evolution?

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Don Bauder Aug. 19, 2012 @ 7:06 a.m.

Evolution is occurring before our very eyes. One example is organisms becoming resistant to drugs. That's evolution in action. But are we evolving into "better" creatures? I wouldn't necessarily say that. Man could be evolving in response to chemicals and changes in food supply. Are we "better" than early man? We may be more intelligent, but may be less emotionally stable, too. We just don't know. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Aug. 19, 2012 @ 12:14 p.m.

Gee, you're the first to say that -- ever. Best, Don Bauder

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