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More than 100,000 San Diego County residents fell from the middle class into poverty or severe economic hardship in the past two years, according to the Center on Policy Initiatives, which interpreted U.S. Census data released today (Sept. 28). The county's poverty rate rose to 12.6% from 11.1% in 2007. Meanwhile, the wealthiest one-fifth of San Diegans raked in 49% of all income, while the poorest one-fifth got only 4%, said CPI. Of the 374,000 county residents below the federal poverty line, more than 121,000 were children -- leading to a stunning 17% childhood poverty rate, according to the liberal-leaning think tank.

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Comments

SurfPuppy619 Sept. 28, 2010 @ 3:55 p.m.

On the AP wire this mnorning;

**The income gap between the richest and poorest Americans grew last year to its largest margin ever,*

a stark divide as Democrats and Republicans spar over whether to extend Bush-era tax cuts for the wealthy.

The top-earning 20 percent of Americans — those making more than $100,000 each year — received 49.4 percent of all income generated in the U.S., compared with the 3.4 percent made by the bottom 20 percent of earners, those who fell below the poverty line, according to the new figures. That ratio of 14.5-to-1 was an increase from 13.6 in 2008 and nearly double a low of 7.69 in 1968.

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SurfPuppy619 Sept. 28, 2010 @ 3:56 p.m.

This divide eclipses the 1920's which used to have that record of greatest income disparity.

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Founder Sept. 28, 2010 @ 5:02 p.m.

"Of the 374,000 county residents below the federal poverty line, more than 121,000 were children -- leading to a stunning 17% childhood poverty rate, according to the liberal-leaning think tank."

Poor childhood = Greater crime stats on the horizon

Add a cut in library hours (either cut or Browned out) and our future Leaders, future education, looks less than bright thanks to Greedy Politics...

This effect has already begun to show up in South Bay:




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Don Bauder Sept. 28, 2010 @ 11:20 p.m.

Response to post #1: Those numbers would suggest that San Diego is slightly less unbalanced in wealth/income distribution than the U.S. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Sept. 28, 2010 @ 11:22 p.m.

Response to post #20: The Gilded Age has been replaced. In re the CPI interpretation of the data: I don't know the methodology used. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Sept. 28, 2010 @ 11:23 p.m.

Response to post #3: It is showing up in many places throughout the county. Best, Don Bauder

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nan shartel Sept. 29, 2010 @ 10:28 a.m.

man Don...this is heartbreaking stuff.....

and look who running for the senate and governor in the state...2 who made more unemployment with outsourcing...regardless of the business prospectus of the need for it..(GREED)...outsourcing is a dirty word all over this country

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Don Bauder Sept. 29, 2010 @ 12:13 p.m.

Response to post #7: Outsourcing to domestic firms does not have a great negative effect on overall employment, unless the firm slashes employment. The sending of jobs overseas kills us -- and fattens the wallets of CEOs that are already raking in outrageous sums. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Sept. 29, 2010 @ 12:19 p.m.

The sending of jobs overseas kills us --

Wipes out the tax base....

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Rocket_J_Squirrel Sept. 29, 2010 @ 12:42 p.m.

More than 100,000 San Diego County residents fell from the middle class.......

What income is considered middle class in San Diego?

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nan shartel Sept. 29, 2010 @ 12:42 p.m.

Off shoring” is the concept of moving jobs either physically or electronically to another country. The concept was enhanced by Reagan-era tax policies that allowed corporations that manufactured products outside the United States to avoid paying federal income taxes on those products. The result was that many plants were closed and jobs were moved to other countries. Additionally, NAFTA has been credited with a loss of jobs to Mexico and Canada. Government policies shape the business environment, but the decisions about jobs are made by company executives and heavily directed by customer choices.

most of those companies then closed their plants for employment to American workers and that does create a rise in unemployment...maybe Americans need to think about buying American made products only...even if it costs a little more

http://www.americansworking.com/

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nan shartel Sept. 29, 2010 @ 12:49 p.m.

when we are as a political nations unhappy with the behavior of a foreign country we refuse to do business with them...why not refuse to do business with American companies that have outsourced most or all of our jobs to other countries

more blame for the failure of our economy needs to be focused on the GREED driven companies that have literally RAPED the American worker with these outsourcing policies

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nan shartel Sept. 29, 2010 @ 12:53 p.m.

but more then just chin music needs to be applied

~~stepping gracefully down off my soapbox now~~

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JustWondering Sept. 29, 2010 @ 7:29 p.m.

Here's some interesting info I found about the Middle Class... it is about three years old so adjust as appropriate:

The U.S. Census Bureau breaks down the reported household incomes into quintiles (or five divisions). In 2007, the middle quintile reported an income range of $36,000 to $57,660. Many economists and politicians alike believe this range is too narrow to encompass the true middle class of America. Therefore, a more generous range would include the middle three quintiles, which makes the range from $19,178 to $91,705. This range accounts for 60 percent of all households, and with the lower end balancing near the poverty threshold, this range may not be completely accurate.

Median Income

The 2008 census reported the medium income as $50,233. The PewResearch Center suggests that the middle income range is 75 percent to 150 percent of the median income. This would make the middle class income range $37,675 to $75,350. To most, this range seems small, and surveys conducted by the PewResearch Center find that many who fall outside this range still consider themselves middle class.

Read more: What Is an Average Middle Class Salary Range? | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_5212740_average-middle-class-salary-range_.html#ixzz10yYhbKV1

And here's the link to the PewResearch Center report...again the report is from April 2008, so things have gotten worse so make adjustments as appropriate:

http://pewsocialtrends.org/pubs/706/middle-class-poll

One of the most interesting parts of study is well down the page and also has a very telling chart about how Median family wealth has grown in recent decades. The biggest gains by far have been made by those in upper income groups.

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Don Bauder Sept. 29, 2010 @ 10:38 p.m.

Response to post #9: Wipes out the manufacturing base, too. Formerly, manufacturing was where the good jobs were. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Sept. 29, 2010 @ 10:40 p.m.

Response to post #10: I don't have that number offhand. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Sept. 29, 2010 @ 10:42 p.m.

Response to post #11: "Buy American" campaigns have had limited success. All you have to do is look at all those shoppers streaming into Wal-Mart to buy Chinese products cheap. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Sept. 29, 2010 @ 10:44 p.m.

Response to post #12: Those kinds of boycotts have not been successful. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Sept. 29, 2010 @ 10:45 p.m.

Response to post #13: You may be graceful, but you ARE flexing your muscles. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Sept. 29, 2010 @ 10:48 p.m.

Response to post #14: A range of $37,000 to $91,000 sounds about right. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 Sept. 30, 2010 @ 8:57 a.m.

One of the most interesting parts of study is well down the page and also has a very telling chart about how Median family wealth has grown in recent decades. The biggest gains by far have been made by those in upper income groups.

By JustWondering

The ONLY familes that have made gains in the last 10-20 years are public employee familes-and the super rich. Everyone else has been squeezed.

Take out the public employees and there is a net loss for poor and middle class families.

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nan shartel Sept. 30, 2010 @ 9:31 a.m.

19

only the one between my ears..lol

i guess if the public doesn't care enuff to support American workers they'll just have to face the consequences of a severely out of balance socioeconomic system

what would u suggest to right the situation Don...what would work short of a revolution

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Don Bauder Sept. 30, 2010 @ 10:16 a.m.

Response to post #21: It is true: the superrich on Wall Street and at the top of American corporations, along with public employees, are raking in the monetary gains while the rest of us stagnate. That's what happens in Third World countries. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Sept. 30, 2010 @ 10:22 a.m.

Response to post #22: First, we need a more progressive tax system. Higher-bracket tax rates should go up substantially. Tax breaks for corporations should be peeled back drastically. Second, runaway pensions for public employees must be reined in somehow. Several cities should band together and agree that they will pay to take the case to the Supreme Court. Then they should take their cities into bankruptcy. When the judges declare that the cities can no longer afford the pensions, the cities should collectively take the cases all the way to SCOTUS, if necessary. San Diego should be one of those cities. Best, Don Bauder

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chillblaine Oct. 5, 2010 @ 10:17 a.m.

If we tax the most productive earners, how does that help those at the bottom, exactly? Income transfers? What about a negative income tax? In spite of this income disparity, the poor have a higher standard of living than they did a generation or two ago.

The topic of out-sourcing is interesting, and also keep in mind that we in-source capital-intensive jobs to this country, while much of the out-sourcing is low skill, labor intensive work. The price difference between a Ryobi and a Milwaukee SawZall reciprocating saw is sixty-five dollars.

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Founder Oct. 5, 2010 @ 12:25 p.m.

Reply #24 Great post with Great suggestions for our "Recovery"...

I wish I had the clout to get you some face time with President Obama!

RE: "The cities should collectively take the cases all the way to SCOTUS, if necessary. San Diego should be one of those cities. "

I wish San Diego would lead the way, that would be SD City Leadership we voter could be proud of!

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Founder Oct. 5, 2010 @ 12:31 p.m.

Reply #25 RE: "If we tax the most productive earners, how does that help those at the bottom, exactly?"

If the Ultra Wealthy paid more taxes, those taxes would be used to provide for things that the rest of our Country's citizens could use like roads, health care, library's etc...

RE: "the poor have a higher standard of living than they did a generation or two ago." That may be true especially in the poorer parts of the USA but the Ultra Wealthy HAVE NEVER HAD IT SO GOOD in any generation; that's why things in the USA will get ugly unless the Middle Class gets a bit of "recovery"!

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SurfPuppy619 Oct. 5, 2010 @ 4:05 p.m.

What about a negative income tax? In spite of this income disparity, the poor have a higher standard of living than they did a generation or two ago.

LOL..are you for real?????? They do not.

And EVEN IF THEY DID, how does that counter the argument that the entire middle class has bascially been wiped out, starting with Ronnie Raygun, to Bush the First, then Clinton (NAFTA), then to Booshie Junior.

The fact is 90% of the Fortune 500 coprs pay NO INCOME TAX-ZERO!!!, and the other 5% pay minimal taxes.

If the system were working properly ALL boates would float higher-but that is not the case-all the boats below the 95th percentile are sinking, while the top 5% are riding a tidal wave of prosperity......

Lay off the AB Laffer supply side economics, "trickle down" was a scam in 1980, and it's still a scam today.

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SurfPuppy619 Oct. 5, 2010 @ 4:07 p.m.

The topic of out-sourcing is interesting, and also keep in mind that we in-source capital-intensive jobs to this country, while much of the out-sourcing is low skill, labor intensive work.

Manufacturing has ALL been outsourced-it is not low skill labor-it is semi skilled, to highly skilled, manual labor, and that is what drove this country-and it's tax base-to propsperity starting in the post WW II era moving forward until 1980 when Raygun took office and everything started going downhill..........

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SurfPuppy619 Oct. 5, 2010 @ 4:10 p.m.

BTW- China, India and those other countries who have taken our manufacturing base-they have closed markets, manipulate their currency and do a host of other things that the President/s should have shot down 3 decadeds ago to make our trade FAIR-we do not have fair trade right now and that is anothe rmajor reason we're in the toilet....... maybe then we would not have export deficits the kind no one has ever seen before.............

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Don Bauder Oct. 5, 2010 @ 10:21 p.m.

Response to post #25: The highest earners are not necessarily the most productive in society. In fact, it's often the opposite; they are the ones who have licked the most boots. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Oct. 5, 2010 @ 10:23 p.m.

Response to post #26: Passage of Prop. D will only delay the inevitable bankruptcy. That's why so many pols -- and Sanders cheerleaders in the media -- are for it. The pols can get out of office before the inevitable occurs. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Oct. 5, 2010 @ 10:25 p.m.

Response to post #27: The superrich have a solemn obligation to pay higher taxes in the country in which they have prospered so handsomely. I wish more understood that. Warren Buffett does. Why don't others? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Oct. 5, 2010 @ 10:27 p.m.

Response to post #28: Middle class real (inflation-adjusted) personal income has been going down for a long time. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Oct. 5, 2010 @ 10:29 p.m.

Response to post #29: You are correct, and keep this question in mind: why are certain high tech and low tech jobs outsourced to foreign countries? One reason is that, despite their economic problems, they have excellent educational systems. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder Oct. 5, 2010 @ 10:33 p.m.

Response to post #30: The absence of fair trade is a problem. But in some cases, we have nobody but ourselves to blame. China manipulates its own currency downward. We want them to revalue the renminbi. But they hold a bundle of our debt. Are we going to force them? Come now. Best, Don Bauder

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chillblaine Oct. 8, 2010 @ 5:30 p.m.

28 Nothing personal, but Reagan and Clinton together added almost forty million jobs, hardly going downhill. It was Volcker who re-built the dollar, which is the opposite direction we are going now. That devaluation erodes as much purchasing power as any taxation policy.

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Founder Oct. 8, 2010 @ 6:36 p.m.

How about current "Events"?

Here's a graphic showing the jobs lost under Bush vs. Obama.

http://politicalirony.com/2010/02/06/jobs-lost-bush-v-obama/

I wish someone had one for SD...

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