Catfish (silurus glanis)
  • Catfish (silurus glanis)
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Weekly Fishing Report

Inshore: The barracuda bite that came on strong by the end of last week faded a bit and the yellowtail numbers dropped off locally. A few white seabass are making the private boat and kayak counts. Kayakers are enjoying the extraordinarily rare opportunity to catch tuna and dorado within a couple miles of the beach in San Diego. The yellowfin and big bluefin tuna are still close and taunting the ½ and ¾ day boats away from the kelp edge and out into open water. Larger 3- to 7-pound calico bass are biting well in the evenings of the kelp edge.

Outside: The bluefin tuna bite picked back up and they are still the larger variety fish. The dorado (AKA Mahi-mahi) counts dropped a bit offshore, but still great fishing for the acrobatic-fighting and very tasty pelagic wanderers. Yellowfin tuna continue to raid the inshore and offshore waters within 1 day range of San Diego and a few skipjack tuna are in the mix.

July 19-25 Dock Totals: 7,161 anglers aboard 284 boats out of San Diego landings caught 5,278 yellowfin tuna, 1,220 bluefin tuna, 3,340 yellowtail, 2,224 dorado, 15 skipjack tuna, 1 white seabass, 634 calico bass, 261 sand bass, 4 lingcod, 204 barracuda, 215 rockfish, 8 sheephead, 3 halibut, 100 mackerel, 40 bonito, 9 sculpin, 2 whitefish and 2 striped marlin, one of which was released.

Fresh water: Catfish are biting and night-fishing is now ongoing at Lake Jennings Friday & Saturday (Friday 6pm to midnight, Saturday 6am to midnight) through September 7; Santee Lakes from 5:00 to 11:30pm August 13 & 27; Dixon Lakes 5pm - 11:45 pm Thursday & Friday through late August, and Friday and Saturday night until 10pm at Lake Henshaw through the summer.

Whale Report: There are still lots of blue whales in the area, with many sightings of cows with calves. Expect to see large pods of common dolphin offshore and a few bottlenose dolphin inshore as well. The large amount of bait in the water has made for a lively summer whale-watch season as the leviathans follow the “fuel” needed to complete their migration. A couple rare for the area hammerheads have been sighted again this past week.

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