Tijuana Equals Death

I would like to express my deep concern for the portrayal of Tijuana in two recent reports featured in the Reader: “Greetings from Tijuana” (Cover Story, August 7) and “Suicide Tourism” (Cover Story, August 21). I find it very disconcerting that your paper is consistently presenting a slanted view of Tijuana, a view that chooses to ignore other aspects of Tijuana’s reality as an important center for business, economic development, tourism, and cultural activities. Proof of this one-sided view are the letters that some of your readers have already sent you expressing their criticism.

In the case of the report “Greetings from Tijuana,” it is undeniable that Mexico has had a share of violence as a result of the resolve shown by the current administration in confronting the criminal networks plaguing our country. However, the report is centered in presenting sensationalistic aspects of this complex problem, instead of providing your readers with a more complete perspective on the reasons that generate the violence that is challenging both of our countries. The very broad brush with which your paper paints Tijuana does a great disservice to your readers.

The cover for your most recent issue featuring the story “Suicide Tourism” is another reason to be concerned about your portrayal of Mexico. By associating Tijuana with death in a very graphic way on your cover for the August 21 issue, your paper again presents a very negative and unfair portrait.

I encourage you to present a more balanced and objective perspective on Mexico’s reality, as it would seem that the overarching objective of both pieces is to discourage people from visiting Tijuana, rather than informing your readership.

Remedios Gómez Arnau
Consul General of Mexico
in San Diego

Paid To Kill

Re “Suicide Tourism,” Cover Story, August 21.

How much are you being paid to kill tourism in Tijuana?

Turismo de Salud Tijuana

Too Unbiased

I guess I didn’t get the memo. How nice of your publication to put this in the hands of hundreds of thousands of San Diegans (“Suicide Tourism,” Cover Story, August 21). I don’t have up-to-the-minute statistics on your demographics; however, I would assume it’s in the 18-to-30 range. Did you stop to think of the impact this would have on impressionable teenagers and adults alike? Although the spin in the article is focused on seniors or those with terminal illness, I wonder how people will respond to the aloof tone of Ernie Grimm? And to go as far as publishing the locations of these veterinary pharmacies — an added bonus, I must say. Now I not only know how to end my pain, but I know the exact street location of the Tijuana vendor I should go to.

I have a family member who used a similar book to the one mentioned in your article (if you could call an editorial of this caliber an article). Had he not been depressed and found comfort in a book (like the one mentioned) he may have sought help and other means of support from family and professionals. However, this book made the alternative to living an easy choice.

I know from an editorial standpoint you must remain unbiased, but how do you stay unbiased on this subject? And to go as far as putting it on the cover with a skeleton for a bus driver with a license plate reading “muerte”?

I don’t aim to be sarcastic or rude, and I’m sure from my own point of view I sound quite conservative. On the contrary, I’m a 24-year-old born-and-raised San Diegan who enjoys reading your publication. And, to be honest, this is the first story I’ve felt the need to comment on due to its controversial nature. I applaud the Reader for its ability to take risks; however, this crosses the line on multiple levels.

Thank you for letting me rant and rave a bit.

Name Withheld
by Request
via email

MOUs and LOIs

I commend Mr. Bauder for his well-researched and skillfully written article on Warner Springs Ranch (“Hot Water,” “City Lights,” August 21). He attributes to current general manager Jim Stilwell a fact I believe is erroneous. I believe that subsequent events and investigation prove that Highlands Resorts never tendered a $3000 deposit to Warner Springs Ranch pursuant to the established unsolicited Letter of Intent process. Instead, the Highlands Resorts “draft MOU” that was announced by Mr. Stilwell in a post to the Warner Springs Ranch website on August 17, 2008, was the product of a solicited process and therefore not subject to the established unsolicited LOI process.

This revelation brings owner-schmowners closer to the truth as well as a complete and honest answer to the question I’ve been asking for over three months; as referenced in the article, how did Highlands Resorts cut in front of other offerors and jump from last in time to first in line?

Moreover, also unanswered are questions of who first solicited Highlands Resorts and when the solicitation process first began. I hope everyone who has ever “taken the waters” at Warner Springs requests answers from Mr. Stilwell via email at JStilwell@ WarnerSpringsRanch.org and the current board of directors via email at board@ warnersprings.com.

Greg S. Maizlish
via email

Long Ago At Warner Springs

In general a good article as per Warner Springs re the last 30 years and over 100 years ago (“Hot Water,” “City Lights,” August 21). For about 70 years before the entity of Warner Springs Ranch, the property was open as a resort.

G. Henshaw
via email

Brain Rattlers

Your essay on airport noise was so partial in information as to be almost laughable (“Life Under the Flight Path,” Feature Story, August 21).

First, the technology to muffle the sound of jets is well known. I’ve seen three-engine passenger jets fly overhead with barely a whoosh. Why not just say to all airlines and private planes, you can’t land in our town if you make noise?

That brings up a second point. I’ve heard private single-jet planes make as much noise as any passenger jet. Ban them.

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