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— "I went back five years ago because I still had a lot of real estate there which had been confiscated by the government. I wanted to see if I could get some of it back. The economy was in terrible shape. The official unemployment rate is 20 percent, but it is probably much higher. This is especially hard on Christians because no one will hire them. The government keeps a file on every Iranian citizen, the surveillance is enormous, and if it says in your file that you're a Christian, no one is going to hire you, no one will loan money to you. You are constantly being watched. Our mail was opened. My phone was constantly tapped. And at one point, after a pastor had been killed -- they literally buried him alive -- someone left a note on my front door asking if I didn't miss the pastor who'd been murdered. I showed the note to my pastor, and he told me to be very careful and keep a low profile.

"The sad thing is that most Iranians trust Christians. They know it is difficult to be a Christian in Iran, and they know Christians are honest, serious people. They would like to hire you and do business with you. But they can't. It's too risky. And for Christians, the situation is impossible. The government does not want you to talk about Jesus. And if the Christian mission is to preach and to teach others, what can you do? Once I passed out a few fliers about our church, and the next day the man on our street who keeps an eye on everyone for the government, he came to me and said he knew what I'd done, and he told me not to do it anymore. Iran right now is no place for Christians.

"I don't believe it will be this way forever. The government right now is an unjust government and, as we all know, unjust governments inevitably fall."

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