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The Mission Hills Heritage Org. presented it's own plans for the Uptown Community Plan for review and community comments. It was held Thursday, August 5, at 7:00 p.m. at Mission Hills United Church of Christ located at 4070 Jackdaw Street, San Diego, CA 92103.

This unique Planning effort built upon Local Residential input, used a Private Planner instead of being "lead" by the City Planning Department and their results were remarkable.

Their plan did not favor Business owners over Residents and was also VERY proactive about actually reducing zoning while also saving their single family home neighborhoods from Density encroachment! Those concepts are not being promoted in the City lead Plans as it goes against their "adding more Density along transit corridors" thinking! While that may be OK for local business's, it avoids taking into account all of the Residents that are living nearby that will end up with a Quality of Life REDUCTION. To make their case, they made great use of local photos, to illustrate different types of proposed Development, instead of vague descriptions of generic planning concepts and best of all, their presentation is now on the web for all to see!

For more information on their plan: http://www.missionhillsheritage.org/Current-Projects/uptown-community-plan-update.html

Comments

nan shartel Aug. 11, 2010 @ 9:20 a.m.

oh my goodness...and goodness is the key word here...i must drive thru Mission Hill and see it for myself again soon

my Da lived in Mission Hills for 30 years from the 1950 thru 1980 time frame...what a perfect little bedroom community it was...i visited him there often when i was a child...and we also picnicked at Presidio Park

i would hate to see all the ambiance that existed there disappear...the old Craftman's homes...the street lighting...curvy streets ....wide sidewalks etc

i hope that North Park can take Mission Hills lead Founder...but it's alway an up hill battle when a greedy city officials and contractors want to encroach on a lovely town

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Founder Aug. 11, 2010 @ 11:56 a.m.

Reply to #1

For the Greater Good

has morphed into

For the Greater Greed

Lots of NIMBY folks that push their own trip on others "because they can" and they enjoy being fawned over by eager City Planners and Developers, as long as they are not Planning on doing anything on their quiet street...

These are the very same people that are promoting "reduce public parking because it will "encourage" others to ride the bus", that all drove their cars to the meeting!

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Founder Aug. 12, 2010 @ 12:19 p.m.

Reply #3 I urge you and all your neighbors, to get involved immediately both in starting your own Residential Improvement District and in the Greater Planning Process, as the City is already Planning to do a "30th Street Mobility Plan"...

This will, I believe, focus on adding Density (and all the Blight that accompanies it) to South Park. The large Gala Food property is a giant target, that if Redeveloped into "mixed use" (Condo's and Retail like Ralph's Hillcrest) will make South Park much less desirable and lower everyones properties values...

Waiting to see what the City suggests will only give them time to "work" residents over and promote their "We need to make room for all the new folks that are coming to San Diego" mantra... In reality the City is desperate to increase it's tax base and if all the current South Park residents sold their properties, the City would win BIG because of all the increased property taxes...

That is why The Mission Hills Heritage Org. Plan is so important, it proposes Density limits, protects Residential Neighborhoods and also demands adding facilities BEFORE ADDING DENSITY, because adding facilities is something the City is notoriously bad at...

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CommonSense Aug. 20, 2010 @ 11:55 a.m.

The suggestion that all density is bad and that blight is a result of density is simply not accurate. Little Italy was considered so blighted in the early 1990's that one of the first developers to come in paid exactly $1 for what is now considered prime real estate. Today, property values in Little Italy are soaring, despite the housing downturn and businesses continue to thrive despite the recession. You can look at downtown San Diego as another example.

The reason that communities such as Hillcrest, North Park, and South Park are attractive to so many people is that these are walkable neighborhoods where people can live, work and entertain without having to get into their car. This mixed-use arrangement is the traditional model of urban planning that was typical before Americans became addicted to driving. Once we figured out how to build cars, roads and infrastructure efficiently (based on the premise of cheap fuel) that was the birth of sprawl, and ironically the same time that older communities such as North Park and South Park started to become "blighted". The rebirth of these communities was triggered by the realization that spending 2 hours in your car commuting from your mcmansion in suburbia to your job downtown was not enhancing your quality of life.

A recent SANDAG analysis forecast 1.2 million more people living in San Diego County by 2050. According to the report, we will need 390,000 more homes in this region in the next 40 years to accommodate that growth. The way we've dealt with growth for the past 50 years is by sprawling ever further from the city center. That model is not sustainable. Our city can't afford to maintain an ever growing network of roads and utilities. If our city is on the verge of bankruptcy today, how will we be able to meet the needs of 1.2 million more people? Will the San Diego of 2050 have decent schools, police force and adequate fire department response times?

It's a nice fantasy to think that our neighborhoods don't need to be part of the solution when taking a broad look at our problems. The truth is that everything is interconnected. The money used to repair roads, sidewalks and water mains in South Park comes out of the same pot of money that is used to repair that type of infrustructure in those distant suburbs. More importantly though, those distant neighbors with the vast green lawns and swimming pools in every backyard are consuming our finite resources (water, gas and electricity) at an alarmingly faster rate than we are.

Adding density along the commercial corridors of our beautiful older communities is not only sensible, it is the only responsible way to meet the future growth of America's Finest City. If it's done the right way, it will not detract from the historic character of our communities. Instead of wasting your energy fighting growth, wouldn't it be better to engage in a conversation about how we can best deal with it?

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Founder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 4:24 p.m.

Reply #5 Nine years ago in North Park, we had a small group of folks work with City Planners to Plan what was then considered Best for all of US with little to no Public outreach, except for the "meeting junkies" and we narrowly dodged the Density bullet then because about a hundred Residents showed up at a "Special" meeting an told those running it where they could stick their Plan. Now nine years later, many of the at very same Planning group is back again pushing all the same tired ideas as dogma; here are half a dozen:

❶ The myth that folks will not be driving, so let's not include parking requirements. Tight parking will encourage folks not to drive but these same folks will not also encourage parking meters in the Business Districts or Residential Parking Permit districts in our neighborhoods.

❷ Move parking to the back of the buildings, which is very hard to do when the building is at the rear of the lot, except to tear down and rebuild. That's OK we'll build it GREEN.

❸ Businesses must grow, but we can't be bothered about planning for it's impact and blight in nearby Residential neighborhoods. They should have known better than live near a Business District!

❹ Density is wonderful, (more customers!), but where are the services for these folks, the parks and open spaces that establish our Quality of Life? Oh, that will be done at another meeting!

❺ 2050's 1.5 million people influx! This will never happen, except on paper and every Planner wants in on that "make work" project in these hard times, lots of meetings means lots of Money spent on Planning...

❻ Increase housing limits on our Transportation corridors (aka linear ghetto's) instead of spreading it equitable, which may put it too close to where these same folks live!

and PLEASE don't talk lack of money to me when our City Council allows themselves sitting as The Redevelopment Agency to squander so much money on special projects instead of fixing our infrastructure now without asking for a tax increase.

Our City is awash in special Projects and special concessions to all those supportive to our Leaders, which includes the big Unions and Planners...

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Founder Aug. 20, 2010 @ 4:46 p.m.

Reply #5 Welcome to the Reader Blog, glad this is your first post! Nine years ago in North Park, we had a small group of folks work with City Planners to Plan what was then considered Best for all of US with little to no Public outreach, except for the "meeting junkies" and NP narrowly dodged the Density bullet then because about a hundred Residents showed up at a "Special" meeting an told those running it where they could stick their Plan. Now nine years later, many of the very same Planning "group" are back again pushing all the same tired ideas as dogma; here are half a dozen:

❶ The myth that folks will not be driving, so let's not include parking requirements. Tight parking will encourage folks not to drive but these same folks will not also encourage parking meters in the Business Districts or Residential Parking Permit districts in our neighborhoods.

❷ Move parking to the back of the buildings, which is very hard to do when the building is at the rear of the lot, except to tear down and rebuild. That's OK we'll build it GREEN.

❸ Businesses must grow, but we can't be bothered about planning for it's impact and blight in nearby Residential neighborhoods. They should have known better than live near a Business District!

❹ Density is wonderful, (more customers!), but where are the services for these folks, the parks and open spaces that establish our Quality of Life? Oh, that will be done at another meeting!

❺ 2050's 1.5 million people influx! This will never happen, except on paper and every Planner wants in on that "make work" project in these hard times, lots of meetings means lots of Money spent on Planning...

❻ Increase housing limits on our Transportation corridors (aka linear ghetto's) instead of spreading it equitable, which may put it too close to where these same folks live!

and PLEASE don't talk lack of money to me when our City Council allows themselves sitting as The Redevelopment Agency to squander so much money on special projects instead of fixing our infrastructure now without asking for a tax increase.

Our City is awash in special Projects and special concessions to all those supportive to our Leaders, which includes the big Unions and Planners...

If you really want to see an example of High Quality Community Planning check out what the Mission Hills Heritage.Org did

ON THEIR OWN WITH A PRIVATE PLANNER:

http://www.missionhillsheritage.org/Current-Projects/uptown-community-plan-update.html

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