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Kerry Steigerwalt's Pacific Law Center, a heavily-advertised law firm, as of today (June 30) is taking few if any new cases, although it will finish cases it is now working on, according to two knowledgeable employees at the firm. It may farm out new cases to other law firms. Steigerwalt's firm put out a press release that I have not been able to get. Nor have I been able to reach Steigerwalt or his executive assistant. It is not clear what the firm will do after it wraps up current cases. The firm, which resulted from a merger of Steigerwalt's firm and Pacific Law Center, has been specializing in driving-under-the-influence, personal injury, medical malpractice, and defective drugs and products cases. It also has a group of lawyers purportedly aiding people with financial problems. That group works on bankruptcy and debt relief matters. The firm has advertised heavily on Padres games. Ted Leitner has been a spokesman, lauding its services.

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Comments

pascal June 30, 2010 @ 5:23 p.m.

Good grief, is there any business in this town that hasn't closed down, or nearly done so, sometime after Ted Leitner was their spokesperson, except maybe D.Z. Akins? The man's the kiss-o-death!

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SurfPuppy619 June 30, 2010 @ 5:26 p.m.

Pacific Law Center was a major fraud-I am surprised it has not closed sooner than now. I would think there would also be several malpractice lawsuits against them.

They had inexperienced lawyers (nothing wrong with that assuming they worked small case with strong oversight and charged reasonable rates reflecting their inexperience-they did neither), and charged fees far in excess of what their services were worth.

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SurfPuppy619 June 30, 2010 @ 5:33 p.m.

I just checked the county court website, and pacific law center has had 42 lawsuits filed against them in the last 30 months, 12 in 09 alone.

That was just in state court-they had 2 cases in federal court also.

Tha place is a fraud IMO.

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Don Bauder June 30, 2010 @ 5:38 p.m.

Response to post #1: Shut down? How about when the principals go to the slammer? Case in point: Metabolife. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder June 30, 2010 @ 5:39 p.m.

Response to post #2: You will find many complaints about this law firm online. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder June 30, 2010 @ 5:40 p.m.

Response to post #3: I am not surprised. Best, Don Bauder

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Visduh June 30, 2010 @ 5:54 p.m.

Funny. Steigerwalt as a defense attorney had quite a record. Starting about 15 years ago, he was the defense counsel for a series of high-profile criminal cases. I cannot remember a single one that he won. All the cases he took seemed to involve the "guilty-as-sin" sort of defendant. (I wish I could remember the names of a few of those defendants.) And the jury usually agreed wholeheartedly with the prosecution, convicting on all or nearly all counts, and the perp went up for a long sentence, after being severely lectured by the judge. This all raises a number of questions, about why he had such defendants, about why he seemingly never prevailed, and about his ability, let alone skill, as a criminal defense attorney. Could it be that even the judges are finally starting to question his competence?

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SurfPuppy619 June 30, 2010 @ 6:16 p.m.

Steigerwalt as a defense attorney had quite a record. Starting about 15 years ago, he was the defense counsel for a series of high-profile criminal cases. I cannot remember a single one that he won.

I always wondered the same thing-the guy lost all his cases but kept getting those high profile cases.

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Don Bauder June 30, 2010 @ 10:01 p.m.

Response to post #7: What I am hearing is that the young, untrained lawyers in that firm have been the problem. I understand a new manager was brought in a couple of weeks ago. I don't yet know what role he has played. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder June 30, 2010 @ 10:03 p.m.

Response to post #8: I dealt with him a couple of times over the years and thought he was responsive -- at least, I remember that. My memory is definitely not what it used to be. Best, Don Bauder

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pascal July 1, 2010 @ 11:56 a.m.

Response to post #4: Yes, Metabolife was the top contender I had in mind, but don't forget Dr. Glen Kawesch too. Is he still in prison? And Jenny Craig; I think he may have promoted them prior to their financial woes several years back. And there were others. I can't recall the name but I'm pretty sure there was an auto dealer he shilled for (Cadillac or Lincoln, I think) that went belly-up shortly thereafter. Also, I think a restaurant, and maybe an attorney. It got so bad, it became a running joke between a few friends of mine: If you hear Ted Leitner promoting any product or service, run for the hills, they're bad news! I'm surprised he still gets those gigs.

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TryThinking July 1, 2010 @ 12:52 p.m.

Complaints filed against a law firm are nothing new. What would be relevant is a discussion regarding how many of the complaints/suits were well-founded, and how many were successful - not how many were filed.

Kerry Steigerwalt is a class act - the business he was attempting to salvage turned out to be beyond saving - a poor business choice, yes, but his legal acumen cannot be disputed.

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Don Bauder July 1, 2010 @ 12:55 p.m.

Response to post #11: Too bad Leitner doesn't tout stocks for a living. You could short every one he promotes. I do think the eye doctor is out of prison -- at least, he had a short sentence, as I recall. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 1, 2010 @ 12:57 p.m.

Response to post #12: It would be worth looking into those lawsuits, as well as some other suits Steigerwalt and the firm participated in. Best, Don Bauder

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Ponzi July 1, 2010 @ 1:23 p.m.

I’m inclined to agree with “TryThinking.” Kerry Steigerwalt’s peers in the legal community hold him in high esteem. Steigerwalt jumped into Pacific Law Center to try and turn it around. In retrospect, it was in far too much trouble by the time he came along - a miscalculated business decision anyone could make.

Like Jacoby & Meyers, Sam Spital and Pacific Law Center, mass advertising campaigns and leagues of inexperienced law graduates to build a law practice is a recipe for disaster.

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Don Bauder July 1, 2010 @ 1:39 p.m.

Response to post #15: It is my understanding that a new manager came in two weeks ago. My guess is that this move is a result of that. Best, Don Bauder

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JustWondering July 1, 2010 @ 2:12 p.m.

I know both Kerry and his wife Beth, they are both fine people and their kids are the type any parent would be very proud of. Kerry is as others have stated here is a class act, and if there is a fault, he is too generous with his time and efforts.

Others here have also questioned his skills as a lawyer. Well I believe, everyone is entitled to lawyer who needs one. I believe Kerry gives that to those who are not entitled to a representation for the public defenders office in criminal cases. In fact, Kerry has provided the best defense considering the circumstances of the offense in every case.

While the Pacific Law Center appears to be not the best business decision ever made, don't fault the man for trying to save good jobs for San Diegans.

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SurfPuppy619 July 1, 2010 @ 2:57 p.m.

Kerry Steigerwalt is a class act - the business he was attempting to salvage turned out to be beyond saving - a poor business choice, yes, but his legal acumen cannot be disputed.

1-I have no idea if Kerry is a class act or not, don't know him-but I do know PLC was accused of some very bad misconduct.

2-I also know that while the number of lawsutis filed against anyone does not mean they are guilty of all charges-it DOES indicate that a number of people are not happy. One of those bird rock bandit perps used PLC and got taken for over $100K, and THAT is a well know fact, widely reported. Other well known facts are that PLC was using unlicensed lawyers, on their cases, widely reported.

While making a "poor business choice" is not criminal, fraud is.

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SurfPuppy619 July 1, 2010 @ 3:01 p.m.

Like Jacoby & Meyers, Sam Spital and Pacific Law Center, mass advertising campaigns and leagues of inexperienced law graduates to build a law practice is a recipe for disaster.

Jacoby and Meyers is still in business, but not using the same business model they used to be.

And Pat Frega put Sam Spital out of business, and then Frega himself was later disbarred but continued to work as a "paralegal" with Bill Lerach at Millberg Weiss. Some might have called Frega's work at Millberg as practicing law w/o a license.

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Don Bauder July 1, 2010 @ 8:30 p.m.

Response to post #17: Do you really believe he took control of Pacific Law Center to save San Diegans' jobs? Don't you think there was some profit motivation there? Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 1, 2010 @ 8:35 p.m.

Response to post #18: Using unlicensed lawyers can get a firm in trouble. Whether it is true of Steigerwalt's firm remains to be seen. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 1, 2010 @ 8:37 p.m.

Response to post #19: Didn't Frega spend some time behind bars for his payments to judges? Best, Don Bauder

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Visduh July 1, 2010 @ 8:49 p.m.

Response to #15:

Steigerwalt's daughter was involved in a fatal traffic crash on I-5 in 1994. Three or four Carlsbad High girl students were in a single car that rolled and hit a tree near Palomar Airport Road. One girl in the car died. His daughter was one of the occupants who survived.

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Don Bauder July 2, 2010 @ 7:54 a.m.

Response to post #23: I was not aware of that. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 July 2, 2010 @ 8:19 a.m.

Steigerwalt's daughter was involved in a fatal traffic crash on I-5 in 1994. Three or four Carlsbad High girl students were in a single car that rolled and hit a tree near Palomar Airport Road. One girl in the car died.

By Visduh

That is awful-and a heavy burden to carry for all.

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JustWondering July 2, 2010 @ 8:30 a.m.

Don, In response to your question in #20. Yes, I believe both played a part in the decision to take on the task of rescuing PLC from the previous owners. But greed wasn't the primary motivating factor, Kerry was already successful. And, I know Beth wasn't too keen about the whole thing right from the beginning. But supported her husband's decision as best she could.

Risk is present in almost all we do, and hindsight will always be 20/20 or better.

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Don Bauder July 2, 2010 @ 9:22 a.m.

Response to post #25: Agreed. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 2, 2010 @ 9:28 a.m.

Response to post #26: I still don't think that attempting to rescue a heavily-advertised law firm ranks as the highest form of magnanimity. Best, Don Bauder

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Visduh July 2, 2010 @ 11:42 a.m.

Response to #29:

Well, I was sure until you raised the issue. Some net-surfing has not revealed anything. The girl in question would be a young woman now, early 30's. Perhaps a different Steigerwalt? Until I can find out more, I take post #23 back.

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Don Bauder July 2, 2010 @ 2:30 p.m.

Response to posts #s 29 and 30: So erase the notion until somebody checks it out thoroughly. Best, Don Bauder

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nan shartel July 2, 2010 @ 2:44 p.m.

i have to be very careful here now Don...i need to speak directly to ur subject matter

so:

many business and such will be failing because of the economic difficulty we r all dealing with now..we may be saddened but shouldn't be surprised by this

addendum;

i still expect u to sew Eeyore's tail back on homey!!!

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MsGrant July 2, 2010 @ 3 p.m.

Wow, that firm advertised up until the very end! So, I have a question. We hear so many stories of attorneys gone bad. Don't most enter the legal profession with some sense of honor? What happens?

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sdsocialdiary July 2, 2010 @ 3:10 p.m.

Glen Kawesch died of apparent heart issues in Mexico... the year was 2007

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Don Bauder July 2, 2010 @ 7:58 p.m.

Response to post #32: Many businesses large and small have already failed. More will. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 2, 2010 @ 8:02 p.m.

Response to post #33: Sense of honor? Let me relate a story. Members of a liar's club in a small town were lining up to tell their whoppers to the townsfolk. The first got up and said, "Last winter, it was so cold that I saw a lawyer with his hands in his own pocket." Everybody agreed that this lie could not be topped, and the meeting was adjourned. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 2, 2010 @ 8:04 p.m.

Response to post #34: I didn't know that. And you are an excellent source. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 2, 2010 @ 8:13 p.m.

Response to post #35: Kawesch pleaded guilty to tax evasion, greatly through offshore havens. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 2, 2010 @ 8:14 p.m.

Response to post #36: Your math appears impeccable. Best, Don Bauder

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MsGrant July 2, 2010 @ 8:47 p.m.

I mean before they became lawyers. In school, are they bright-eyed optimists, looking forward to their futures defending the unfortunate, or are they maladjusted sociopaths choosing this career as a means to fuel their needs? I am serious. I have never understood the desire to go into law. It seems tainted. The old joke - what's the difference between a dead rat in the road and a dead lawyer in the road? Answer: The skid marks in front of the rat. What drives a person to become a lawyer if there is a whole genre out there devoted to the scorn of them? Besides $. The cost of law school is ungodly, so there is something of an offset.

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Don Bauder July 2, 2010 @ 10:20 p.m.

Response to post #42: A close friend of my wife's went through medical school. She said the students were about equally split: some were idealistic about healing the sick, the rest were just greedy, looking to make a bundle of money. I suspect it's the same in law schools, although I don't know that it would be a 50-50 split. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 2, 2010 @ 10:23 p.m.

Response to post #43: Like you, I am waiting for SurfPuppy's response to this colloquy. Best, Don Bauder

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MURPHYJUNK July 3, 2010 @ 9:55 a.m.

you know what you call a lawyer that is opinionated and so full of b.s that he makes bad decisions ?

"'your honor "

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Russ Lewis July 3, 2010 @ 10:57 a.m.

What do you get when you cross a pit bull and a lawyer?

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Don Bauder July 3, 2010 @ 12:05 p.m.

Response to post #46: Because there is so much more money to be made in the private sector, often the mediocre lawyers wind up as judges. There are some very good ones, though. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 3, 2010 @ 12:08 p.m.

Response to post #s 47 and 48: I thought you would say a son of a bitch. Best, Don Bauder

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Russ Lewis July 3, 2010 @ 12:10 p.m.

(#50) I don't care to state the obvious.

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Don Bauder July 3, 2010 @ 1:50 p.m.

Response to post #51: How about PETtifogger? Best, Don Bauder

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Robert Johnston July 3, 2010 @ 10:40 p.m.

When Uncle Teddy speaks--San Diego tunes him out...or tells him to attempt spaceborne coitus with the nearest lunar body!

Currently, he's shilling for Medi-Fast Weight Loss Centers; D.Z. Akins; Ruth's Chris Steakhouses--if a potential shill-ee has the money, I guess he has the time-and-voice.

KS/PLC: Correct me if I'm wrong, but aren't a lot of PLC's cases taken on a contigency basis? (No-win, no-pay) If so, then Esquire Steigerwalt wasn't thinking too swift when he bought Pacific Law Center. Wonder how many of those were either settled out-of-court, or were lost?

Another "Uncle Teddy Approved" company circling the bowl and leaving skid marks on the way down? Par for the course in this market!

--LPR

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Don Bauder July 4, 2010 @ 7:29 a.m.

Response to post #53: Call it space age coitus interruptus. In re PLC taking contingency cases: I don't know the answer to that. Best, Don Bauder

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Visduh July 4, 2010 @ 9:37 a.m.

This slamming of Leitner is getting a little out of hand. One operation he touted for years is Marvin K Brown, which used to be exclusively a Cadillac dealer. It is still in business, having survived when Guy Hill Cadillac in PB folded a few years ago. I think what does irritate the listener is having Leitner give those fervent testimonials for products or services he assures us that he really loves. But when the money stops coming, his loyalty evaporates. (Such as with Metabolife.) But plenty of others locally do the same things. Rick Roberts and Hedgecock have both touted dubious products over the years and most of them are just a memory. Right now Dr. Laura is on Ovation Hair Therapy as the greatest thing ever, attributing near-miraculous properties to the stuff. That will of course cease, probably soon, never to be heard of again.

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MURPHYJUNK July 4, 2010 @ 11:23 a.m.

What do you get when you cross a pit bull and a lawyer?

probably end up as a registered sex offender, you are not supposed to promote that kind if thing.

( and I'm sure the pitbull has more integrity than the lawyer and would not co-operate)

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Don Bauder July 4, 2010 @ 11:40 a.m.

Response to post #55: That's Leitner's job: touting products. He has to do what the advertisers tell the station they want. He has had the bad fortune to get some real doozies, such as Metabolife, whose founders went to the pokey. At what point did Leitner learn that Metabolife was causing physical harm -- and deaths? He may have never gotten the word, or didn't want to hear it. In any case, it would have been the job of station management to refuse the ads. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 4, 2010 @ 11:44 a.m.

Response to post #56: If the geneticists doing the cross-breeding were to be sent to the hoosegow, then we all would be deprived of "What do you get when you cross....?" jokes. That would be a pity. Best, Don Bauder

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Russ Lewis July 4, 2010 @ 12:50 p.m.

"'A conscience for hire,' as our peasants call a lawyer."

--Fyodor Dostoyevsky

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Don Bauder July 4, 2010 @ 1:28 p.m.

Response to post #59: Shakespeare wanted to kill all the lawyers. First. Best, Don Bauder

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Twister July 4, 2010 @ 5:04 p.m.

"We prohibit profanity, libel, spam, racial epithets, and the harassment and abuse of others. Any off-topic comments stand a chance of being removed. In other words: talk about the site content, not each other."

I'm glad the Reader is not too zealous about exercising this rule, as it helps to get a better idea of a postor's character when they go personal. But facts about a person are not necessarily libelous, eh?

However, the issue here is ethical conduct, and it's a civic responsibility to blow the whistle on it--ever more loudly and widely, one would hope. "To be, or not to be," that is still the question. And it's always a fair one.

The trouble is, there's too much going on with respect to honoring ethics more in the breach than in the observance--yea, tho an example tis the key to the principle that lay exposed the multitudes of sins.

Lawyers, even sportscasters, and all others who share the glare of public recognition have an even greater responsibility to avoid conflicts of interest and owe the public a duty to avoid shinin' us on, man! If--IF an organization for whom a "celebrity" worked ORDERED one of its salaried celebrities to tout ANY commercial or professional enterprise, it is violating that trust, and should be boycotted by the aggrieved parties, to wit, the public, and the entity touted likewise avoided. Yeah, SURE!

It has come to this: If it is advertising, it is kaka de toro, horsemanure! It's a handy guide which should be lesson one in all civics classes. CIVICS classes? CIVICS CLASSES, you say--whut the hang izzat?

(I hope I have successfully evaded the cybercensor.)

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Don Bauder July 5, 2010 @ 7:52 a.m.

Response to post #60: Shakespeare's great quotes are often misused -- at least, they have come to be interpreted in ways that Shakespeare did not intend. I used one in a recent column. I said that countries' new-found fiscal conservatism was "honored more in the breach than in the observance." That's how we use that quote: revered principles are broken more often or as often as they are obeyed. But when Hamlet used the quote, he was talking about his no-good stepfather's bad habits that were more honored when violated than when followed. That's a different meaning. But since the public interprets the quote in the former context, I used it. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 5, 2010 @ 8 a.m.

Response to post #62: Your remarks should sail right past the censor. Your statement is profound. Yes, a publication should not knowingly take ads for financial scams or from an enterprise touting anti-social or unethical activity. Unfortunately, money talks. The publications and stations are pressured by their owners to come up with profits. So the slimy ads get through, and readers get fleeced or get some social disease. Greed kills. Best, Don Bauder

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MURPHYJUNK July 5, 2010 @ 10:45 a.m.

Response to post #64

if they ( stations, media in general) were to look into the ads they run on late night tv, they would go broke rejecting all the scam ones.

all one has to do is google the name of the product and use the word scam in the search to see what is going on.

prime example lately is Directbuy

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Don Bauder July 5, 2010 @ 11:51 a.m.

Response to post #64: One that gives me a chuckle is for a product named, as I recall, Extenze. Supposedly, this product lengthens and/or widens the male's sex organ, and also prolongs and enhances his sexual performance. This doesn't even run in the late evening. I have seen it around 8 p.m. It seems to me that a product that purports to do these things should be regulated by the FDA. This product sounds dangerous. I saw the ad for several months, then didn't see it for awhile. Now there is a new one which doesn't quite make the same claims as the old one, but comes close to doing so. It would be interesting to see if the company producing this product got in trouble with the FDA, or if networks and stations questioned the claims. Best, Don Bauder

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Grasca July 5, 2010 @ 12:07 p.m.

If I may say, the attorney bashing has reached its zenith. When a person needs an attorney, you want someone with the expertise and the skills to represent you in whatever the matter is. It seems that after the fact when the case is settled that all gratitude goes out the window. There are certainly bad attorneys but there are also many fine ones. I don't know the attorney in question but bringing his family into the discussion seems to be crossing boundaries whether the comments are positive or negative. It reminds me of the days when people make fun of the preteen Chelsea Clinton's looks. Not cool.

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a2zresource July 5, 2010 @ 12:33 p.m.

"But facts about a person are not necessarily libelous, eh?"

Are facts EVER libelous? Of course, I'm assuming the "facts" are TRUE... why even bother mentioning FALSE facts about somebody then not expecting some kind of slap-back?!?

I always thought the truth of statements made was an automatic defense against an allegation of libel, slander or other defamation. Indeed, truth is the magic armor shielding all of investigative journalism...

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Don Bauder July 5, 2010 @ 7:10 p.m.

Response to post #67: The discussion of Steigerwalt's family seemed restricted to whether or not a daughter was injured in an auto accident. It was decided she wasn't. I don't think that discussion was in bad taste. Best, Don bauder

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Don Bauder July 5, 2010 @ 7:12 p.m.

Response to post #68: Truth may not be a defense if proven malice is involved. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 5, 2010 @ 7:18 p.m.

Response to post #69: I agree that the FDA shouldn't jump in just because some over-the-counter pseudo-medicine is being hyped outrageously. However, remember that I said this product sounded dangerous to me. If it increases blood flow to the extent that it apparently does, I would think medical regulators -- not just fraud investigators -- should look at it. Best, Don Bauder

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Grasca July 5, 2010 @ 7:38 p.m.

I don't see what the attorney's family has to do with his law firm. Professional and personal lives don't necessarily connect in these situations. The attorney in question seems to have enough professional difficulties without dragging in his family. It served no real purpose in my opinion. His family is not in the advertisements and deserve their privacy especially if the family member mentioned is underage.

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Don Bauder July 5, 2010 @ 9:44 p.m.

Response to post #73: But I thought we determined that the accident that supposedly involved his daughter didn't happen. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 5, 2010 @ 9:50 p.m.

Response to post #74: It took a long time for the FDA to look at Metabolife, which was actually killing some people. Finally, one of its founders went to prison for falsely telling the FDA that Metabolife had a clean safety record when the company had fielded numerous very serious complaints. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 5, 2010 @ 9:51 p.m.

Response to post #75: I didn't interpret that post in the way that you did. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 6, 2010 @ 7:31 a.m.

Response to post #79: Metabolife gave money lavishly to politicians -- not just Bilbray and those in San Diego. In re the FDA: this agency is really busy. Sure, it should have moved more quickly on Metabolife and ephedra. But the FDA had a lot on its plate then. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 6, 2010 @ 7:40 a.m.

Response to post #80: After re-reading the comment, I repeat what I said before: I didn't interpret it as a dig at all. Best, Don Bauder

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Grasca July 6, 2010 @ 11:16 a.m.

At least Bilbray was not endorsed by the product makers mentioned in #66.

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Don Bauder July 6, 2010 @ 11:53 a.m.

Response to post #83: Oh yes, Bilbray kept supporting Metabolife and its felonious founders even after it became clear that users were being harmed. Money talks, and often nauseates. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 6, 2010 @ 11:55 a.m.

Response to post #84: How do you know he wasn't backed by the ExtenZe (expletive deleted). Best, Don Bauder

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Grasca July 6, 2010 @ 1:57 p.m.

I don't know if the male enhancement manufacturers actually supported my least favorite Republican illegal immigrant chaser but was concerned and alarmed that he might need to visit a doctor because of "side effects" from using the product.

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Don Bauder July 6, 2010 @ 9:39 p.m.

Response to post #87: I don't know the side effects of the male organ enhancement product, but it might be inducing the user to ditch his current wife and marry a filthy rich one. Best, Don Bauder

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Grasca July 7, 2010 @ 6:51 a.m.

While I have not seen the "side effects" warning for this particular product, other products with the same claim do not induce the user to ditch his wife. It is a problem of a more organic nature which discretion will not allow me to detail. The politician in questions would probably benefit from a few sessions in a sweat lodge to help him find his inner warrior. But I digress from the topic where mention was made of lawyers and ethics. I understand that lawyers do take a class in ethics but I am not sure if a passing grade indicates the student will have or has a moral compass. By the time a person is in law school, it would seem that the moral compass exists or does not. However, this is only my opinion and I am not an attorney.

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Don Bauder July 7, 2010 @ 7:24 a.m.

Response to post #89: In re lawyers, it's the old, sad story: get your client off by following the letter of the law, not the spirit of the law. Best, Don Bauder

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Grasca July 7, 2010 @ 8:31 a.m.

If you are innocent, are you "getting off" or is justice being served ?

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Don Bauder July 7, 2010 @ 11:19 a.m.

Response to post #91: In the case of true innocence, justice is served. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 July 7, 2010 @ 1:07 p.m.

The politician in questions would probably benefit from a few sessions in a sweat lodge to help him find his inner warrior. =============== Where can I find one of these so called sweat lodges? This is a Native Americans tradition-correct?

I understand that lawyers do take a class in ethics but I am not sure if a passing grade indicates the student will have or has a moral compass.

There are no required classes imposed by the ABA, with ONE exception-ethics! All ABA LS's require one 45 hour ethics class as a condition of graduation in order to maintain ABA approval. LS's are free to design their programs in any way they wish aside from the ethics class.

And as I have said repeatedly here-a 45 hour ethics class at age 25 is not going to change anyones ehtics or moral compass-it is really a useless waste of time, money and energy so states can impose more "feel good" rules, laws and regulations.

If the states wanted to foot the bill for this garbage I would feel less hostility towards it, but they don't. They just want to impose useless, do nothing, "feel good" rules, laws and regulations. In fact I would equate this to the 18 month techer credentialing classes needed to be certified as a teacher (which has no testing or other objective standard to use as a measure once the classes are finished)

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nan shartel July 7, 2010 @ 1:20 p.m.

Response to post #42: A close friend of my wife's went through medical school. She said the students were about equally split: some were idealistic about healing the sick, the rest were just greedy, looking to make a bundle of money. I suspect it's the same in law schools, although I don't know that it would be a 50-50 split.

i think most all Docs who specialize r NOT in it for the money to begin with...the work.. mental involvement...the hours they have to spend at work or on call and the loans needed to repay their schooling is prohibitive to motives of pure avarice and greed

arrogance does play a large part in medical school..some really enjoy thinking they're GOD...and that i think would be a trait they share with law student...hahahahahaha

see Don...i can comment on subject

now about that "100 acre woods" picnic.......

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Don Bauder July 7, 2010 @ 1:38 p.m.

Response to post #93: The only way to achieve an ethical society is to throw the malefactors who commit ethical breaches in the slammer. But instead, we elect them to high office. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 7, 2010 @ 1:48 p.m.

Response to post #94: Yes, doctors are trained to believe they are gods. And they forever remind other medical personnel, such as nurses, of their omnipotence. There is one story I love: a fellow who said he was a doctor was in a room with a bunch of nurses. Some medical equipment fell on the floor. He stooped to pick it up. Immediately, the nurses suspected that he was not really a doctor. It turned out that he was an impostor. Best, Don Bauder

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nan shartel July 7, 2010 @ 2:56 p.m.

96

hahahahahahaha....and a lawyer immediately filed suit on those nurses because he got a back injury

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nan shartel July 7, 2010 @ 2:57 p.m.

95

and to teach values and ethics in the schools

starting in kindergarden

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MsGrant July 7, 2010 @ 3:08 p.m.

Re #98 - don't forget fiscal responsibility!

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nan shartel July 7, 2010 @ 3:55 p.m.

good idea MsG...piggy banks to school kiddies!!!

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Don Bauder July 7, 2010 @ 7:37 p.m.

Response to posts #97 to #100: If we taught kids ethics and economic responsibility in grade school, we wouldn't have anybody to occupy those important posts on Wall Street and in Congress. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 July 7, 2010 @ 8:18 p.m.

If we taught kids ethics and economic responsibility in grade school, we wouldn't have anybody to occupy those important posts on Wall Street and in Congress.

And that's the problem, as David Cay Johnston points out in his books, the break down in morals and ethics at all levels of business and gov, starting at the top.

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MsGrant July 7, 2010 @ 8:44 p.m.

And a perfect post as to why it should not start breaking down at the top, but should have a solid foundation of ethics and morals to build on at the very beginning, resulting in not a fundamental decay starting at ground zero and resulting in no foundation at all and a crumbling of all that build upon it, but a grand layer of trust and ethics upon which to build.

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Don Bauder July 7, 2010 @ 8:59 p.m.

Response to post #102: Yes. I don't believe in trickle-down economics. But I do believe in trickle-down amorality. Best, Don Bauder

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Don Bauder July 7, 2010 @ 9:03 p.m.

Response to post #103: Good luck in your hope for "a grand layer of trust and ethics on which to build." When we're young, we believe that love makes the world go 'round. As we get older, we realize it's greed. Best, Don Bauder

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JustWondering July 8, 2010 @ 6:38 a.m.

Jeez Don, I always believed you were an optimist based on the stories you write and the angles they contain. Where did I go wrong?

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Don Bauder July 8, 2010 @ 6:58 a.m.

Response to post #106: Yes, I am often called Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farms. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 July 8, 2010 @ 8:07 a.m.

Jeez Don, I always believed you were an optimist based on the stories you write and the angles they contain. Where did I go wrong?

By JustWondering

With 3%@50 pension scams.

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Don Bauder July 8, 2010 @ 10:36 a.m.

Response to post #108: Touche. Best, Don Bauder

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Duhbya July 8, 2010 @ 12:12 p.m.

RE #105: There was an anti-drug warning in the late 60's, early 70's - "Speed Kills". As I grew more worldwise, I revised it, and I'm sure I was not the only one to do so, to "Greed Kills". Being in sales, I still use it often when going against certain competitors. It seems to be more appropriate than ever.

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Don Bauder July 8, 2010 @ 12:26 p.m.

Response to post #110: It sounds like my "greed kills" slogan is not original. I suspected it wasn't. Best, Don Bauder

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Duhbya July 8, 2010 @ 1:05 p.m.

RE # 111: Sorry for the parade rain, but I can relate. A few weeks ago, when a client asked me how I was doing, I replied, out of the blue,"I'm busier than a mosquito at a nudist camp." I was feeling pretty smug about myself until I searched it on Google a few days hence. Great minds?

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Don Bauder July 8, 2010 @ 8:38 p.m.

Response to post #112: My favorite "busier" metaphor is "busier than a French whorehouse on Bastille Day." Best, Don Bader

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Duhbya July 9, 2010 @ 5:47 a.m.

RE # 111: I did not see your final sentence in post #64 until this morning. SP will no doubt have me up on plagiarism charges!

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Don Bauder July 9, 2010 @ 7:03 a.m.

Response to post #114: SP couldn't charge you with plagiarism unless he thought you stole from him. He has not offered to be my attorney in such a case. I am not interested. Best, Don Bauder

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SurfPuppy619 July 9, 2010 @ 8:42 a.m.

Im not taking anything but my Reader buddies friendship.......but Dubya, you need to be careful, the REAL W might be coming after you for cybersquating, LOL!

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Duhbya July 9, 2010 @ 9:38 a.m.

RE # 116: Well, in the inimitable words of my "namesake", BRING IT ON! LOL back atchya.

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SurfPuppy619 July 9, 2010 @ 10:28 a.m.

Well, in the inimitable words of my "namesake", BRING IT ON!

It wouldn't be a fair fight- the REAL W only has the brain power of a Jr High schooler.

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Don Bauder July 10, 2010 @ 8:27 a.m.

Response to posts #s 116-118: We can always use another scrum. Best, Don Bauder

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steigerwaltinsider July 21, 2010 @ 1:14 a.m.

In Response to Comment #9. Shame on you Don Bauder. Who told you it was the fault of inexperienced attorneys? Kerry?

I worked there and I have 20 years experience - last 2 trials were acquitals, etc. Another attorney 25 years experience and a darn good trial lawyer. Another was a former DA with 15 yrs experience and really knows his stuff. I can go on.

There were a slew of other good attorneys that got out early. We went from 18 lawyers down to 7 at one time in the Crim Dept.

Look to the Captain of the ship - Kerry - he was the first one on the life boat and said "see ya" to the crew. Real Stand up guy - NOT!

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Johnny35 July 31, 2010 @ 9:20 p.m.

Kerry Stiegerwalt can create a new firm and claim it is one of the most successful in the country. But he is getting evicted and Yellow Book wants its money. He hired another attorney named Kerry who came from an unrecognized law school with no experience. Stiegerwalt loves his name so much he doesn't care about qualifications.

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soccermom72 Aug. 27, 2010 @ 3:14 p.m.

Hey Don

What ever happened to your red hot follow up story on this? Have you realized yet that you were lead astray by some upset former employees who had no real idea of what they were talking about?

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Founder Aug. 27, 2010 @ 5:57 p.m.

Reply #122 I'm curious SM72

How do you know that he "lead astray by some upset former employees who had no real idea of what they were talking about?"

Any factual info, you would like to share with us?

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